Dictionary.com

What do a.m. and p.m. stand for?

am_pm

Most English speakers know that a.m. refers to the hours from midnight and noon, and p.m. to the hours from noon and midnight. But what do these ubiquitous abbreviations stand for?

The term we associate with the morning, a.m., is an abbreviation the Latin phrase ante merīdiem meaning “before midday”; p.m. is an abbreviation of post merīdiem, meaning—you guessed it—“after midday.” These two terms help keep ambiguity at bay in the 12-hour time system. There is a third, lesser-known abbreviation in this system: m. from the Latin merīdiēs meaning “midday” means noon. However, m. is rarely used and might confuse readers or listeners should you casually drop it into conversation or insert it into your writing; noon is conventionally expressed as 12 p.m. or 12:00 p.m. and midnight as 12 a.m. or 12:00 a.m.

In formal writing, it is best to lowercase both a.m. and p.m. and retain the periods (as opposed to writing them AM/PM or am/pm); however, should you choose to use a different format, the most important rule is to be consistent throughout your piece. Note that when a.m. or p.m. end a sentence, as in The train is arriving at 10 p.m., it is not necessary to place an additional period at the end. And, for our final writing tip, since these abbreviations specify an hour’s relation to noon, it is not necessary to use morning, evening, night, or o’clock with them.

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320 Comments

  1. Gaby -  June 24, 2016 - 12:19 am

    That was really funny nobody knows the universal time rules really Jesus!

    Panda – May 5, 2016 – 6:29 pm (wrong)
    I know it as AM=at morning
    PM=past morning

    Benita – July 2, 2015 – 7:47 am (wrong)
    It means AM=at morning PM= past morning

    Fazo – July 26, 2015 – 5:25 am(the most funny )
    I’m not an English native speaker, but I found those two:
    AM = After midnight
    PM = Pre-midnight

    ○Just a few guys said the correct definition for AM,PM from Latin:

    Ante meridiem: Before noon
    Between midnight (0:00) & noon (12:00)
    Post meridiem: After noon
    Between noon (12:00) & midnight (0:00)

    Reply
  2. George C.O'Connor -  April 4, 2016 - 6:35 pm

    This is a good one here! Really!

    Reply
    • It's just me! -  April 5, 2016 - 7:08 pm

      This was simple easy, attractive, how can nobody know? Reply if you think i’m right.

      Reply
      • Suvansh -  April 7, 2016 - 7:40 am

        Yeah

        Reply
      • Stephanie -  May 11, 2016 - 9:54 pm

        You ere re sc d

        Reply
    • zamzam -  April 6, 2016 - 8:00 am

      yeah!

      Reply
    • Panda -  May 5, 2016 - 6:29 pm

      I know it as AM=at morning
      PM=past morning

      Reply
      • DivaPie -  May 10, 2016 - 7:50 pm

        That’s a really good way to remember a.m. and p.m. , Panda. I’ll remember that!

        Reply
  3. qwertyuiop -  April 4, 2016 - 1:30 pm

    thanks

    Reply
  4. Ahmed -  April 3, 2016 - 9:34 am

    Thank you it is fantastic how to understanding me.
    I would like Download Dictionary .Microsoft students

    Reply
    • bobert -  April 4, 2016 - 2:50 pm

      hello

      Reply
      • jet wikaire -  April 5, 2016 - 11:48 pm

        sup

        Reply
  5. dope -  April 3, 2016 - 9:28 am

    sup

    Reply
    • swag -  April 4, 2016 - 4:25 pm

      sup dude

      Reply
  6. Leon -  April 2, 2016 - 10:53 pm

    What’s the difference between am and pm?

    Reply
    • Mesquite -  April 4, 2016 - 4:27 pm

      am is from midnight until noon
      pm is from noon until midnight

      Reply
    • bob -  April 5, 2016 - 7:35 am

      One is before noon and the other after noon

      Reply
      • M. Pace -  April 5, 2016 - 4:27 pm

        One is before noon? No, one is usually after noon.

        Reply
        • jiggy -  May 31, 2016 - 11:25 am

          HAHA WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOW

          Reply
    • James -  April 27, 2016 - 7:20 am

      12 hours lol

      Reply
      • Emma -  May 5, 2016 - 7:43 am

        Ha Ha

        Reply
  7. Sadat iqbal -  December 15, 2015 - 1:33 am

    Thnx fo info

    Reply
    • Martina S. -  January 31, 2016 - 4:22 pm

      I like your name what does it mean?

      Reply
    • tropo -  February 1, 2016 - 2:29 pm

      Thanks for answer

      Reply
    • stop!!! -  April 3, 2016 - 11:28 am

      stop spamming

      Reply
      • Otto -  April 4, 2016 - 4:13 pm

        I am glad I can type this, because my stomach is welling up in my throat, after reading all this and having to scroll to the end of this just to reach a date of March 2016.
        I thought the wisdom of the 2015 contributions would never end.

        Now here is something that even some of the adherents to the 24 hours clock don’t know: There is never a time table in which twenty-four, that is 24:00 is mentioned. Why not? Answer: Because in international dependencies, such as railway schedules or flight schedules, the time one second after 23:59:59 is 00:00:00, not 24:00. The new day has started! The old day – yesterday – ended at 23:59:59. If the younger generation wants to grow up to become astro- or cosmonauts and go to Mars. they better forget all that blather about ante and post. But it is true, there is room for noon and midnight for ordinary people and there must be precision for digits to the second or we won’t launch anything to the ISS. Mahlzeit!

        Reply
    • gogoimxz -  April 3, 2016 - 3:41 pm

      A.M. and P.M. are latin abbreviations that stand for ante meridiem and post meridiem.

      Reply
      • peter -  April 5, 2016 - 12:55 am

        I first thought A.Mwas a code or something!

        Reply
  8. Sizwe Mnculwane -  October 22, 2015 - 10:30 am

    Thanks for the info. we see these abbreviations every day but most of us dont really know what they mean!

    Reply
  9. Fazo -  July 26, 2015 - 5:25 am

    I’m not an English native speaker, but I found those two:
    AM = After midnight
    PM = Pre-midnight
    Are much much better :)
    Thanks btw.

    Reply
    • b-ray -  August 13, 2015 - 7:09 pm

      ad a kid I understood it as
      A.M. at morning
      P.M. past morning
      just a helpful way to remember

      Reply
    • Muhammad Umar Shafiq -  August 31, 2015 - 2:13 am

      Dear Sir/Madam,

      Thanks for Knowledge.

      Thanks and regards,

      Muhammad Umar Shafiq

      Reply
      • NIggerFace -  April 6, 2016 - 10:33 am

        Do you like Snackbar?

        Reply
        • Gio -  June 20, 2016 - 7:11 am

          He Likes bombs :D

          Reply
    • Amira -  November 9, 2015 - 4:06 am

      Not a native speaker either, still, I could remember it when I first heard it. What’s so difficult to remember about a=ante (before) and p. post= after and then m, the Latin word: meridiem for noon if that is important and that is what it actually stands for? Don’t use any other stupid words to remember such as at or past, completely irrelevant and unnecessary. “A” comes first in the alphabet and “p” is towards the end so if it is so complicated for you to remember which comes first then think of that.

      Reply
    • Heath -  December 7, 2015 - 9:04 am

      Pre means before so both of them means before midday…..

      Reply
      • William -  April 3, 2016 - 8:22 am

        The P means post, or after, not pre, or before.

        Reply
    • jet wikaire -  April 5, 2016 - 11:48 pm

      thank that better not so muc =h reaeding

      Reply
    • Emma -  May 5, 2016 - 7:44 am

      What do you meen

      Reply
  10. eve -  June 29, 2015 - 2:52 pm

    Do you ever wonder why the English words are based on Latin Phrases, I do.

    Reply
    • Chris -  July 1, 2015 - 10:00 am

      Great article. I have long been curious about what “a.m.” and “p.m.” stood for. Thank you for clarifying

      Reply
    • Andy -  October 24, 2015 - 10:39 am

      English is an indirect derivative of Latin; indirect, because the English language came about through conquest by varying cultures over the centuries (for example, Britain experienced Norman, Scottish, Roman, and French conquest, among others, each time causing the spoken language to accommodate the dominate power). If this actually interests you, I’d highly recommend reading Mother Tongue, by Bill Bryson. Very witty and informative history on the background of the English language, and how it stands apart from other tongues).

      Reply
      • Anonymous Knowledge -  April 3, 2016 - 8:36 am

        English is some what based off of Latin and so are many other languages such as French and Spanish. These languages are called the romance languages because they are based off of Latin.

        Reply
      • Another Andy -  April 4, 2016 - 1:43 am

        Invaded by Romans and Normans I can accept… even those cuddly and hirsute Danes… but England was never ‘invaded’ by the French… (unless you count the recent relocation of the Franco super rich in order to avoid punitive tax hikes) … as for being invaded by Scotland… if you’re referring to that little sojourn down to Derby back in 1745… that was really little more than a pub crawl which stopped short of Wembley when the supporters coach (and horses) broke down ;)

        Reply
    • Bruh TROLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOL -  April 4, 2016 - 11:23 am

      Because most languages are based on Latin.

      Reply
    • Alex -  April 5, 2016 - 9:52 pm

      The English language consists of words from Latin, French and German. It’s just the way languages are created. If you really think about it, a majority of languages consist of Latin, French and German, even Japanese, Chinese, Korean and other languages similar to them.

      Reply
  11. Eva Marceau -  June 29, 2015 - 12:35 am

    When I was little I used to think it was
    A.M= After Midnight
    P.M= Pre-Midnight

    Reply
    • henry bee -  June 29, 2015 - 6:46 pm

      How I learned it was that am = aprez midi for before mid day and par midi = past or after mid day (French)

      NB: Spelling of the French words might be incorrect as I have not used that language since1964.

      Reply
      • Aileen Hampton -  July 2, 2015 - 3:27 am

        But “apres” means “after”. I thought of it as “avant-midi” but couldn’t figure out pm. “Par” means “by”, as in nearby.

        Reply
    • Benita -  July 2, 2015 - 7:47 am

      It means AM=at morning PM= past morning

      Reply
  12. Stephen who steps on hens -  June 12, 2015 - 4:26 am

    I used to think
    A.M. = At morning,
    P.M. = Past morning.
    I guess that makes sense, no?

    Reply
    • Yermo Juan -  June 17, 2015 - 7:18 am

      1200 and 0000 leaves no doubt whatsoever.

      Reply
    • A.samy -  June 29, 2015 - 6:52 am

      i was thinking at the same thing
      ya i think it makes sense

      Reply
    • Benita -  July 2, 2015 - 7:49 am

      U R correct

      Reply
    • Leon -  April 2, 2016 - 10:55 pm

      Yup it makes sense. :D
      Sry if spam

      Reply
  13. Nick -  June 2, 2015 - 3:06 pm

    a.m mean in the morning and p.m stands for aftennoe.

    Reply
    • Anon -  June 3, 2015 - 10:45 pm

      isn’t it afternoon?

      Reply
      • Anon -  June 3, 2015 - 10:45 pm

        and what is afternoe?

        Reply
        • warjna -  June 11, 2015 - 11:56 pm

          A typographical error.

          Reply
        • rafaellopo -  July 1, 2015 - 11:29 am

          no

          Reply
      • Anon -  June 29, 2015 - 6:46 am

        Hi

        Reply
        • Anon -  June 30, 2015 - 10:48 pm

          Hello

          Reply
          • Emma -  May 5, 2016 - 7:39 am

            Hello

    • Lala -  April 3, 2016 - 3:45 pm

      It is spelled A F T E R N O O N, nick.

      Reply
  14. me -  June 2, 2015 - 11:57 am

    why is it not b.m(before midday) and a.m.(after midday)?

    Reply
    • lauren -  June 3, 2015 - 5:39 am

      Because it’s a Latin phrase. Did you miss that part?

      Reply
    • thru -  June 9, 2015 - 8:34 pm

      a.m. – ante meridiem, meaning “before midday”
      p.m. – post meridiem, “after midday”

      Reply
    • someguy -  June 29, 2015 - 12:52 am

      wai is it not b.l. (before lunch) and a.l. (after lunch)?

      Reply
      • lori -  June 29, 2015 - 3:09 pm

        Actually, that would be BLT (bacon, lettuce and tomato) LOL!

        Reply
        • Benita -  July 2, 2015 - 7:50 am

          Nice one

          Reply
  15. Chuck -  June 1, 2015 - 7:32 pm

    For most people, the most vivid part of our day is noontime. So, ‘Meridian’ should be a good word to refer to that time. Therefore, Post Meridian makes perfect sense and Ante Meridian makes equally good sense. This system was quite well devised by our antecedents so that we can communicate heartily and abundantly with this little tool. I also find it stimulating to swing the ante and the post things around too. Splitting hairs over the actual meanings of these two descriptions of time can be fun for some but for others it could probably be disturbing, so, to each their own colloquially accepted ways, and as always, we try to reach broader understandings of how others deal with their situations.

    Reply
    • Jeanie -  June 4, 2015 - 7:01 am

      I enjoyed your comment, especially the part where you said “the most vivid part of our day is noontime.” What a great comment! Especially when we think of noon as the main break in the work day that we look forward to.

      However, the actual derivative when we speak of a.m. and p.m. is “meridiem,” not “meridian.” One definition of meridian (in astronomy) is “the great circle of the celestial sphere that passes through its poles and the observer’s zenith” (per dictionary.com) An example of this is the prime meridian.

      It is easy to confuse the words. They both have Latin origins (from the Latin word for “day.”) When I read that the “a” stood for “ante” (Latin for before) and the “p” for “post,” it brought back memories of the two long years I spent in Latin class. Don’t you love how our languages evolved?

      Reply
    • Alex -  May 4, 2016 - 11:01 am

      WTF is an antecedent?

      Reply
  16. Kyra -  June 1, 2015 - 7:44 am

    I think we all know that A.M. represents the “morning” hours, and P.M. represents the evening hours. I always thought of it this way: A.M. = after midnight…….P.M. = pre-midnight.

    Reply
    • Parker -  June 2, 2015 - 7:34 am

      Me too! I have always thought that, so when I got curious and clicked this, I was so confused!

      Reply
    • Benita -  July 2, 2015 - 7:52 am

      That LOL! :)

      Reply
      • Emma -  May 5, 2016 - 7:52 am

        FUNNY BOY

        Reply
  17. valerij -  May 31, 2015 - 5:53 pm

    it’s funny, i only mentioned this question last night. i learned english in school, but aquired not so much, and now am learning it by my own. and despite of very frequent usage of this notion, i totally missed its meaning and never knew what exactly it means. i mean i have no understanding which of them relate to what. obscurity of this abbreviation played the main role, and in my country in the ukraine 24 hour system is used. and last night i was faced with this problem again and was thinking – it would be nice if i go on the web and figure out finally what this am/pm means. and then i forgot about it, but comming on dictionary for another consultation, just saw the reference on this blog entry. wow! how in time. thanks! in addition to learning sense, i know their etymology, wich i like badly. but seriosly, 23:35 is easier than 11:35 p.m. in all respects. :)

    Reply
    • Jeanie -  June 4, 2015 - 7:45 am

      That’s when I read it, too. What synchronicity! I think that sometimes when we’re surprised in this way, it’s the best way to retain what we’ve learned. I wonder why certain countries adopted different methods of expressing time? In the U.S., we use a.m. and p.m., and our digital clocks have a marker to differentiate them. But I was always fascinated with the 24-hour system, even though most people here never use it. They use in in the military. We used it, like many did, to compute employees’ time worked back in the day, when we used time cards to log in and out at work. It was easy to determine the hours and minutes that a person had worked with that method.

      As a teacher, I once volunteered to teach English to new American immigrants. It was surprising to learn how many people from other countries had never heard of the terms “quarter after,” “quarter to,” and “thirty” (as in, “It’s quarter after three,” (meaning 3:15) or ” It’s quarter to four,” (meaning 3:45) and “It’s now two thirty” – meaning 2:30.) That was the hardest thing for people to understand. Later I learned that they rarely teach this in (American) schools anymore, since most people now have digital time on their clocks, computers, and appliances. But we also still have the clocks with “hands” on them, so people still use those terms here.

      Reply
      • Kashif Mir -  June 15, 2015 - 2:15 pm

        Good post from you. I just want to add something and please pardon me if I am wrong as English is not my first, second or even third language. For 3:15 i would say quarter past 3 and for 3:45 quarter to four. Also for 2:30 i would say half past 2. It sounds better to me (only). But take what you like most.

        Reply
      • nh -  November 13, 2015 - 11:45 am

        wat

        Reply
  18. Robert Hayes Halfpenny -  May 30, 2015 - 6:41 pm

    I take exception to the method of showing 12:00 calling it midday instead noon is totally ridiculous. 12N (with the capital) should be the correct way of expressing noon, and using 12M (with the capital) for the midnight hour. To express a.m. or p.m. for the hour of 12 is a needless confusion. Both times are the delineators of the early hours and the late hours of the day. If 12:00 is shown as either N or M there would never be a mistake as to what time of the day or night it was. i.e. no more calls waking people up or interrupting lunches and certainly no more missing your flight or showing up 12 hours early to catch one. I rest my case!!!

    Reply
    • Derek Holland -  June 2, 2015 - 4:47 pm

      Yes. I agree it is confusing. Why should noon be p.m.(AFTER midday), when it IS midday? Likewise, midnight a.m., before midday, but it is equally between one midday and the next!

      Reply
      • Jeanie -  June 4, 2015 - 7:53 am

        I agree, too. That makes perfect sense. Why can’t those markings be added to the way we address time? 12N and 12 M. They could still use a.m.and p.m. for the other times of day and night.

        Reply
      • Donald Arkin -  July 24, 2015 - 3:26 am

        There is a reason why it makes sense to use 12 am for midnight: because it’s before noon of the same day. This reinforces the idea that the stroke of midnight begins the new day. As for 12 pm, it’s true that it’s at noon, not after it, but wait! What about 12:01 pm? Ah, yes. The only problem is at noon exactly. So the use of 12 am for midnight and 12 pm for noon has only one instant in the whole day when there’s a (small) problem.

        Reply
      • Salim Saw -  October 2, 2015 - 8:30 am

        What I learned in school was 11.59 a.m, 12.00 noon and followed by 12.01p.m.

        And for midnight it is witten as 12.00 midnight.

        Reply
    • Pestilence -  June 30, 2015 - 2:30 pm

      I used to think something along these lines, but now I disagree. I tend think of it as more of a mathematical limit problem. Yes, 12:00:00.000000… is “exactly noon”, but the bulk of the minute we call 12:00, for 59.9999… seconds of it, is still after noon, i.e. in the p.m. All 60 seconds of 11:59 is a.m., all but the narrowest sliver (infintely fine, in fact) of 12:00 is p.m. So 12:00 noon is pretty solidly in the p.m.

      I’m not sure there even is such a thing as “exactly noon”.
      –pest

      Reply
  19. Ramin -  May 29, 2015 - 11:55 am

    23:25

    Reply
  20. jojo -  May 28, 2015 - 12:54 pm

    hi dis is as ool as da sout pole XD

    Reply
    • cat -  May 28, 2015 - 2:48 pm

      a.m stands for the morning and p.m stands for the evening,afternoon,and night.

      Reply
      • marie -  May 28, 2015 - 4:52 pm

        RIGHT YOU ARE !!!

        Reply
        • Vijay -  May 29, 2015 - 10:30 am

          AM stands for Anti meridian

          PM stands for Post meridian

          Reply
        • Pineapple -  June 15, 2015 - 10:39 am

          Man everones smart as heck

          Reply
      • Diane1948 -  May 29, 2015 - 1:18 pm

        But literally, “Ante Meridian” and “Post Meridian,” meaning before noon and after noon.

        Reply
  21. Codobad -  May 28, 2015 - 9:34 am

    Back in the day* (before digital technology dictated everything in our lives not already determined for us by the billionaire one-percenters), noon was neither “a.m.” nor “p.m.”, it was simply noon, Noon, or 12 N, because, obviously, it is neither before nor after midday – it IS midday. Likewise, midnight was simply “midnight” or 12M. (Perhaps, as the article above states, “m. from the Latin merīdiēs meaning “midday” means noon”, but I don’t recall ever seeing that used.)

    Because all human activity must now submit to whatever is convenient for “our” technology, time has to be reduced to two types, categorized as a.m. or p.m., rather than four types (a.m., noon, p.m., midnight) that had been in conventional use for centuries. (Remember the Y2K scare? That was because early programmers had accommodated computers by assigning just two instead of four characters to identify a year. By sparing computers the burden of storing the “19″ in each year, they saved valuable memory space. So when the year 2000 arrived, old software wouldn’t know the difference between 1900 and 2000.)

    Now we have deformed the way we refer to time so that instead of “12 Noon” it is written as “12 p.m.”, meaning “12 after midday”, even though midday will never be after midday … until our technology is able to put us in two times at once!

    Twenty years ago, only the illiterate wrote “12 p.m.” Now those who are computer literate conventionally write and speak of noon as “12 p.m.”, even when they’re not on a computer.

    (Similarly, dates and even page numbers are often written as “May 05, 2015″ or “03″. Not only does digital technology number things this way, but some people have learned to insert the unnecessary zeroes, too, regardless of whether or not the medium is digital.)

    *before digital technology conquered the human mind (e.g., back when “virtual reality” meant “almost”, “artificial” or “not actually real” instead of being perceived as one type of realness)

    Reply
    • marie -  May 28, 2015 - 3:17 pm

      midday and noon are the same thing, both were used but noon more often than midday-midday is more classical but is also correct.

      Reply
    • marie -  May 28, 2015 - 4:26 pm

      I don’t agree with your statement “20 years ago only the ILLITERATE wrote 12 p.m.” fore I knew highly intelligent people, medical doctors and lawyers among them, who used it when writing down an appointment for a patient or client to make it clear to them at what time they must come to their office.

      Reply
    • emfederin -  May 28, 2015 - 6:57 pm

      Put the tinfoil down and step away from the computer.

      I rarely see a collection of drivel so rife with inaccuracies as you just produced.

      Reply
      • Derek Holland -  June 2, 2015 - 4:55 pm

        Well give us some positive wisdom on the matter then, instead of just negative criticism.

        Reply
  22. David.Grain -  May 28, 2015 - 2:57 am

    In the comments there are several references to the 24 hour clock as military time. In the British military there is no such thing as midnight as that causes confusion as to which day you are referring to. Midnight is always expressed as 2359 hours.

    In transport timetables a midnight arrival is 24.00 and a midnight departure is 00.00

    Others are going off topic and talking about zero. The 0, zero or naught was invented in India in the ninth century as I understand it.

    Reply
    • marie -  May 28, 2015 - 3:54 pm

      Thank you for the transport timetable information about arrivals and departures.

      Reply
    • marie -  May 28, 2015 - 4:43 pm

      I learned in primary school that the 0 was introduced into mathematics by an Arab mathematician in the Middle Ages, I have to go back to my Math and History books to reconfirm it. I thank you for talking about it.

      Reply
  23. Bhavna -  May 27, 2015 - 9:56 pm

    Bhavna
    Am is Ante- Meridians and Pm Is Prime Meredians or post meridians if we study geograph from basic u will understand every thing longitude, lattitude ,am and pm.how the time is measured.

    Reply
    • marie -  May 28, 2015 - 6:25 pm

      When I was 6 years of age in primary school I learned that A.M. meant AVANT MIDI and that P.M. meant POST MIDI, and that both words and terms were from Classical Latin – AVANT Meaning “BEFORE” and POST meaning “AFTER” and “MIDI” meaning MIDDAY or NOON when the sun is at its highest point. Of course this is when you are teaching 6 year old students. We began to study Geography, reading and understanding maps, latitude, etc…, at 8 to 9 years of age so we learnt A.M. and P.M. in and from a linguistic background which is normal for the age level of six years. .

      Reply
    • Girl -  June 11, 2015 - 3:35 am

      Am is ante Meriden and pm is post Meriden I’m only ten I leart that ages ago it’s so simple by the way prime meridian is the invisable line across the earth used for mapping or latitude and longitude. And while I’m being a smarty I will say I’m have the highest knowledge level I’m my class but I’m in grade 5 but our class is a 5 and 6 so I’m smarter than a grade six yay I’m so proud

      Reply
  24. Anna -  May 27, 2015 - 12:13 am

    ooops…ante not anti…pardon pls.

    Reply
    • George -  May 27, 2015 - 2:04 pm

      There is another method to keep the ambiguity between day and night times. It is commonly used in Europe and in North America, it is called Military Time or W (for Whiskey, as opposed to Zulu, which is UTC, Universal Time Coordinated http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coordinated_Universal_Time). In this twenty-four hour usage, 0000 Hours is the start of a new day, 2400 hours is the end of the day (the same time as 0000 Hours, just signifying the beginning and not the end of a day). 1700 hours is 5 PM and 2000 Hours is 8 PM, there can be no ambiguity as there are 24 hours in a day, 2400 minutes in the day, with no repeating numbers throughout. Zero Hundred through twenty-four Hundred … easy!

      Reply
      • Guilherme Carvalho -  May 27, 2015 - 4:01 pm

        Careful, 24h usage is not just counting from 0 up: there are not 100 minutes in an hour (so there are *not* 2400 minutes in a day).
        You count the hours up from 0 to 24, yes, but the other two digits are just the minutes, not hundredths of an hour. You’ll find it more often written as 13:40 (instead of 1340) to mean 1:40 p.m., for instance.

        Reply
        • marie -  May 28, 2015 - 4:50 pm

          Mr. Carvalho, I agree with you completely !

          Reply
      • Mike -  May 28, 2015 - 1:11 am

        ANTE MERIDIAN

        POST MERIDIAN

        Reply
      • marie -  May 28, 2015 - 3:48 pm

        There are 24 hours in a day and there are 60 minutes in an hour, thus 24 multiplied by 60 equals 1440 minutes, or perhaps my multiplication is different than yours.

        Reply
  25. Anna -  May 27, 2015 - 12:04 am

    a.m. = anti meridian
    p.m. = post meridian

    Reply
    • Anna -  May 27, 2015 - 12:14 am

      ops: ante NOT anti..a thousand pardons please.
      A

      Reply
    • rey -  May 27, 2015 - 11:09 am

      I thought it stands for Prime Meridian and Amplitude Meridian. Are they the same meaning.

      Reply
      • Greg -  May 27, 2015 - 4:06 pm

        You got a.m amd p.m. mixed up with the am and fm radio bands.
        Amplitude modulation.
        Frequeny modulation.
        That’s where amplitude figures in.

        Reply
    • Wafi -  May 27, 2015 - 2:25 pm

      Wow! I wondered the same too! Now my question got answered.

      Reply
    • emfederin -  May 28, 2015 - 3:25 am

      “a.m. = anti meridian p.m. = post meridian”

      It’s meridiem, not meridian.

      While meridian effectively refers to midday and so confuses the issue, by definition the terms are ante and post meridiem.

      Reply
    • L.D. -  May 31, 2015 - 1:40 pm

      The proper spelling is ante meridiem and post meridiem NOT meridian, diem in Latin means “day” as in per diem which is usually a fee refunded to one who travels to cover daily lodging, meals and incidentals. Sorry, I’m a stickler about proper spelling and labels.

      Reply
      • Jeanie -  June 4, 2015 - 8:06 am

        Correct – it IS meridiem, from the Latin word for day. Many people will recall the expression, “Carpe diem!” which translates “Seize the day!”

        Meridian is a term used in geography (latitude and longitude.) The prime meridian is one that many people have learned about in school.

        Reply
  26. :D -  May 26, 2015 - 10:36 pm

    cool never know

    Reply
    • :D -  May 26, 2015 - 10:37 pm

      awesome to know

      Reply
    • :D -  May 26, 2015 - 10:39 pm

      it’s cool it’s cool to know about this:):))::):):):):):)
      . .
      (_)

      Reply
    • :D -  May 26, 2015 - 10:40 pm

      it’s cool to know this AWESOME

      Reply
  27. Alice -  May 26, 2015 - 1:06 am

    I learned this in school just a couple of weeks ago!

    Reply
    • #getrekt -  May 26, 2015 - 6:29 pm

      dont forget about P.M.. Pre-Midnight

      Reply
      • #getrekt -  May 26, 2015 - 6:30 pm

        my bad that was meant for D.

        Reply
    • Edward -  May 26, 2015 - 9:07 pm

      I don’t care. >:-)

      Reply
      • marie -  May 28, 2015 - 3:23 pm

        Good for you, you’re going to live a long life for saying what you think.

        Reply
    • vynl -  May 27, 2015 - 8:49 am

      what time is it :)

      Reply
      • Emma Wadford -  May 5, 2016 - 7:53 am

        10:54

        Reply
    • marie -  May 28, 2015 - 6:41 pm

      Hi Alice, I’m glad you learned this in school a couple of weeks ago, and I would like to know in what year of school are you, thanks.

      Reply
  28. D -  May 25, 2015 - 1:33 pm

    If you think of A.M. as After Midnight you cannot go wrong.

    Reply
    • Matthew Pascarella -  May 26, 2015 - 4:45 pm

      I think you mean At Morning, and Past Morning. :)

      Reply
    • JK03 -  May 26, 2015 - 5:08 pm

      You could even think of a.m. as “at morning” and it would be accurate.

      Reply
    • Ronny Hansen -  May 27, 2015 - 1:57 am

      I disagree. I do believe you can go wrong with the notion of a.m. being simply “after midnight”. First of all, the entire remainder of the day is after the previous midnight the way that, for instance, 8 PM is 20 hours after midnight. The problem becomes more acute just after noon, as 12.10 p.m. is not significantly farther from midnight than for instance 11.55 a.m. The temptation to think/use “a.m.” for a time in the early afternoon (such as 1 p.m.) may then be stronger. It’s better to just learn the why and how of it than to use a potentially misleading shortcut.

      Reply
      • Random -  October 26, 2015 - 9:00 am

        Well, I don’t see what you’re trying to say at all, since the day’s split into 2 equal 12 hours, each with an hour of 12, After Midnight clearly should suggest the 12 hours after midnight. And Pre-Midnight the 12 hours before, no? Or is that just me?

        Reply
    • vynl -  May 27, 2015 - 8:46 am

      tru

      Reply
    • Emma Wadford -  May 5, 2016 - 7:54 am

      How is D

      Reply
  29. Alex -  May 25, 2015 - 12:17 pm

    Don’t forget 0 (Zero )
    So,
    What about
    0 AM
    0 PM
    ???

    Reply
    • DS -  May 27, 2015 - 4:13 am

      There is no such thing as 0 AM/PM in general humans start counting at 1. So at 12:59AM in 1 minute we end up at 1:00 PM and vice versa.

      Reply
    • marie -  May 28, 2015 - 2:47 pm

      0 AM IS MIDNIGHT AND 0 PM IS NOON OR MIDAY I PRESUME BUT IT IS NEVER EXPRESSED VERBALY LIKE THAT, WE SAY MIDNIGHT OR NOON AND WE WRITE 12am or 12pm

      Reply
  30. Alex -  May 25, 2015 - 12:15 pm

    Don’t forget 0 (ZERO) .So,
    What is 0 AM and O PM

    Reply
    • Rasheeda Wager -  May 27, 2015 - 9:57 am

      If it is 0 am or pm it is actually 12 o’clock. I learned that from a goddess,who really love me read the bible you would learn that stuff just from the bible

      Reply
      • jean -  May 27, 2015 - 3:12 pm

        except the bible is talking about one god, not three million gods or goddess’. and god is timeless. and please do not start fighting of my opinion even though i personally think of it as a fact

        Reply
    • Chuck -  May 27, 2015 - 2:50 pm

      Alex, you seem to be having a hard time with this Zero concept. Zero is actually the absence of something, in this case, a nominal time. ‘Zero’ in relation to time does not even exist because time is fluid, ongoing and doesn’t ‘stop’ to be counted – we only count it as it goes by. We can neither see, hear, taste, smell nor touch it, yet we know that it exists. We also know that zero describes exactly that – zero. So, here we are trying to describe a concept that does not even exist. However 00:00 does exist in the mind which is very full of lies that we firmly believe in. Time would have to stop for it to be true, however since time cannot stop, we must believe that it does stop temporarily (which is a lie) so that we can entertain the (non existent) ‘concept’ of 00:00. — Perhaps if we could imagine it as a very short period of time such as a nanosecond, then we could grasp something concrete and call it that, then, we could think it is real even though it is not.
      In storytelling (which is never in ‘real time’, we can easily wrap our heads around 00:00 because it occurred in either the past or will occur in the future, and somehow we feel OK with that as being a truth. But then, if we allow reality to take it’s proper place in our minds, we just know that it just doesn’t exist.
      Does/did/will that help?

      Reply
      • jean -  May 27, 2015 - 3:16 pm

        so is god, you cannot see him, touch him, or smell him but yet we know he’s there, well…. some of us

        Reply
        • Chuck -  May 27, 2015 - 5:07 pm

          him???

          Reply
  31. Desert Rat -  May 25, 2015 - 9:44 am

    Actually, 12:00 P.M. and 12:00 A.M. lead to a lot of confusion. That’s one reason the military uses a 24 hour clock.

    I recently read an article that said there is no such time as 12:00 A.M or 12:00 P.M. 12:00 o’clock is either noon or midnight…period. Think about it. Why would the time after 11:59:59 P.M. be 12:00:00 A.M.? It could just as easily be 12:00:00 P.M. since it follows 11:59:59 P.M. It’s much more clear to simply refer to 12:00 noon and 12:00 midnight. In military time, 2400 is the end of the day, and 0000 is the beginning of the next day; and 1200 is ALWAYS noon.

    Reply
    • BetterRed -  May 26, 2015 - 12:45 pm

      The ’12:00′ is redundant, ‘noon’ and ‘midnight’, are sufficient.

      BR

      Reply
      • Manima -  May 26, 2015 - 11:07 pm

        You do have a point there. 12:00 can only be noon or midnight, so why write both?

        Reply
    • MG -  May 26, 2015 - 3:35 pm

      Yes, you are right is much easier work with military time

      Reply
    • Matthew Pascarella -  May 26, 2015 - 4:46 pm

      Nerd. :(

      Reply
    • Rep Fred Durhal Jr -  May 27, 2015 - 5:19 am

      You are correct about military time. But you know that if we adopted that choice then the old saying about a broken clock being right twice a day wouldn’t exist.

      Reply
    • Michael -  May 27, 2015 - 7:50 am

      Technically, you are right….but you’re right for such minute undefinable fraction of time, that your argument really doesn’t hold water. There is only a single moment that can be called midday or midnight. That moment is at the very very beginning of 12:00. So by the time you have a chance to say “It is 12:00,” it already is in either the morning or the afternoon. Make sense? We call it 12:00 a.m. because any time we reference it, it is already past the “mid” point, so it’s in the morning.

      Reply
      • Aero Commander -  May 27, 2015 - 1:20 pm

        in all reason most of Europe and the world uses the 24 hour clock! when talking about the 12 hour clock: 12 noon is P.M. as with 12 A.M. or midnight. anything after midnight is designated as 00:01 or 00:30
        anything after 12 noon is designated as 12:01 PM… if you was to check birth certificates and people born after midnight it would be like 00:27 as mine is 00:04..

        Reply
        • marie -  May 28, 2015 - 3:08 pm

          EXACTLY !!!

          Reply
      • Chuck -  May 27, 2015 - 3:05 pm

        Michael, your thinking is quite clear. See if this helps to expand your thinking.
        Zero is actually the absence of something, in this case, a nominal time. ‘Zero’ in relation to time does not even exist because time is fluid, ongoing and doesn’t ‘stop’ to be counted – we only count it as it goes by. We can neither see, hear, taste, smell nor touch it, yet we know that it exists. We also know that zero describes exactly that – zero. So, here we are trying to describe a concept that does not even exist. However 00:00 does exist in the mind which is very full of lies that we firmly believe in. Time would have to stop for it to be true, however since time cannot stop, we must believe that it does stop temporarily (which is a lie) so that we can entertain the (non existent) ‘concept’ of 00:00. — Perhaps if we could imagine it as a very short period of time such as a nanosecond, then we could grasp something concrete and call it that, then, we could think it is real even though it is not.
        In storytelling (which is never in ‘real time’, we can easily wrap our heads around 00:00 because it occurred in either the past or will occur in the future, and somehow we feel OK with that as being a truth. But then, if we allow reality to take it’s proper place in our minds, we just know that it just doesn’t exist.
        Does/did/will that help?

        Reply
        • Jon -  May 27, 2015 - 9:55 pm

          But in order for time to exist there had/has to be the absence of time

          Reply
          • Jon -  May 27, 2015 - 10:03 pm

            Think about it like a math problem. There are certain rules in math that we base off of observation. Yet most scientists will agree that we happened by chance. But all of that proof we have comes from within those rules and observations that are indeed very biased and could possibly all be false.

  32. Amely -  May 25, 2015 - 8:59 am

    J’apprécie les explications données ci-dessus, mais en ce qui me concerne, j’ai opté depuis longtemps pour les 24 heures, comme certains d’entre nous ! Je vous invite, pour éviter toute confusion à suivre dorénavant notre exemple : C’est l’ Unique Solution !

    Reply
    • marie -  May 28, 2015 - 3:36 pm

      Je suis completement d’accord .

      Reply
  33. R.L Minor -  May 24, 2015 - 8:25 pm

    When Julian dating was used did the Meridian began a new day, Was 1 pm the first hour of the new Roman day, or when did the Roman day start and end? Was it a 24 hour day, or two twelve hour periods originally.

    Reply
  34. Steve -  May 24, 2015 - 3:13 pm

    The article states that: “…noon is conventionally expressed as 12 p.m. or 12:00 p.m.” However, what it should say is that this is ‘commonly’ how noon is expressed – and it is incorrect as 12 noon cannot be a.m. or p.m. while 12.00 midnight is both a.m. and p.m.

    Noon should correctly be expressed as 12.00 noon and midnight can be 12.00 a.m. or 12.00 p.m.depending on the context and which day you are referring to.

    Reply
    • Aero Commander -  May 27, 2015 - 1:35 pm

      there is no 12pm midnight in all reality nearly everywhere in the world midnight is expressed as 2400 hours, anything after 2400 hours goes as follows 00:01, no a.m. is included…

      AM and PM are abbreviations for ante meridiem and post meridiem mean before noon and after noon post meridiem or post meridian. they relate to imaginary lines running through some point on the earth!

      my sister talks to relatives in Europe and tries to explain our time versus their time and she confused the hell out of them. she uses day and time subtract this from that or add this to that!
      I get on the phone and tell them its 2100 hours your time and its 1200 hours our time same day, unless you go past 2400 then you are one day ahead of us plus 9 hours! they got it real quick. my sister says she doesn’t like using military time. I told her nearly the whole world use it except the U.S. and you!

      Reply
      • George -  May 27, 2015 - 2:15 pm

        Ummm, if 2400 is the end of the day and 0001 is the start of a new day, then where is the minute between 2400 and 0001? If that were true then there would only be 23 hours and 59 minutes in a day. The day ends at 2400, it starts at 0000. Watch the analog clock tick to midnight, take a picture, all three hands will be aligned. Whether it is the end of the old day or the beginning of the new day is a matter of perspective. In fact, because time on a clock is circular, ever repeating, the beginning and end are the same time, every day. People do not like to count from zero, but in fact, before you had your first dollar (or pound or yen or bitcoin) you had none. Zero and none are synonyms, the same presumed to be = (equal).

        Reply
  35. Larkin Huey -  May 24, 2015 - 2:21 am

    Unbelievable! Has the level of teaching in this country sunk so low that someone actually has to ask what a.m. and p.m. stand for? How sad. I guess I shouldn’t be surprised though, they don’t even teach cursive writing anymore. People under 40 print everything because that’s all they know how to do. And teachers wonder why they’re underpaid.

    Reply
    • Elizabeth K. -  May 26, 2015 - 10:43 pm

      Ah, yes. Cursive writing and knowing the elongated form of a.m and p.m is so essential to the core of human living that no one can function without it….. The reason why cursive is no longer used in education is because it serves no purpose and takes time away from learning more important things, you know, like math. Also, will knowing what a.m. and p.m. have any actual effect on anyone’s life? Did this knowledge personally impact your life in any way? Was it the answer to any of the questions on exams you’ve ever taken in school? Obviously not, but why then would you then assume that a student not knowing this is the result of a bad teacher? There is no need for an educator to teach something a student will not need later in life.

      The position of an educator should be greatly esteemed because they are the greatest contributors to influencing the people who will shape the future, yet there are people like you who undermine their importance which is why they’re actually underpaid. As proof, you will find that in Switzerland and several other countries the average pay of an educator is higher because society values it more.

      So many factors come into play with an issue like this but as an aspiring educator, I suggest you get off your high horse and slip into a more empathetic pair of shoes.

      Reply
      • George T4180T -  May 27, 2015 - 2:21 pm

        I can tell you never wright with a hand held, non electronic communication device and put your ideas on paper or papyrus of inscribe them in clay.

        Reply
      • Chuck -  May 27, 2015 - 3:38 pm

        Teaching is not a preparation for a future set of encounters – training is a preparation for the future. Teaching leads to development of the mind and body which in turn provides the individual with a competitive quality which can be applied to whatever that student should happen to decide to apply it towards.
        Trainers are absolutely vital in our society – especially to the vitality of our economy. Teachers are also valuable, however they are a little less affected by economics except by their empathy with/for their students. Generally speaking, teachers’ minds are filled with the problems of their students and that reduces the amount of mental energy they have left for wanting and obtaining more finances. Teachers need to be financed in order to function well. They shouldn’t have to seek it themselves.
        European societies each function differently to ours’ and each has their sets of social values. Our’s is neither ahead nor behind but rather ‘different’, and it functions in it’s own way.

        Reply
      • Jeanie -  June 4, 2015 - 8:51 am

        Cursive writing is a faster method of writing by hand than printing is – have two people, same age/educational level, and dictate to them for 15-20 minutes at a regular rate of speech, then compare what they’ve written. I’m pretty sure that the person who used cursive will have written the most. Then again, if the cursive is written too fast or too sloppily, it may be unreadable. I can see the virtues of each. When I was in high school MANY years ago I learned Gregg shorthand. I can still write it, and when I showed it to my students, they were intrigued – it looked like hieroglyphics to them! So there are many methods of putting your words onto paper.Currently it seems that the preference is for typing. If one can type fast enough, that could easily surpass both writing and printing, in terms of words per minute. Now, texting is another form of communication, and one that I’m not very fond of. But apparently people who use texting “shortcuts” have discovered another abbreviated way of communicating. Whether or not this continues into the future, who knows?

        Reply
    • Anna -  May 27, 2015 - 12:12 am

      Easy answer Larkin Huey: Teachers do not teach children cursive writing because they do not know how to do so. We are now into 2nd gen, (as ‘they’ like to say), of TEACHER illiteracy!

      My neighbour is a ?teacher….who finds it difficult to speak correct English, e.g. comin’; goin; sidee = city; pardee = party; gommunigate =communicate. So, what hope the children.
      A rhetorical question.
      Anna

      Reply
      • Chuck -  May 27, 2015 - 4:53 pm

        Anna, sounds like your neighbuor is smart enough to be colloquially silly enough to be understood by most locals.
        ‘Over the fence talk’ is not the same as ‘in front of the class’ talk. I hope his students are capable of communicating not only during grammar lessons but also at recess time with the rest of the school kids, during dinner at a restaurant, when relatives visit and when they are with others who haven’t yet achieved mastery of the language.
        I would ask you to try to talk with this person using open mindedness and allow that person to enlighten you. If afterwards, you feel ‘good’ about yourself, then it’s a plus for you. :)

        Reply
    • Carl-Johan Jacobsson -  May 27, 2015 - 2:34 am

      Now I understand the fact that you comment is a critique towards society (may I presume the American?) though I believe it is fairly far from being rooted in the real world.
      Firstly I shan’t develop the fact that the world contains a fairly small population of native English speakers compared to those having it as a second language. We are all happy to gain greater knowledge in our time’s lingua franca from sites like this.

      Though I shall rather comment on your claim that the teaching levels have sunk so far that people have “to ask what a.m. and p.m. stand for.” I believe that a.m. and p.m. is just something that you snap up, regardless if you are a native English speaker or not – you learn that a.m. is before noon and vice versa. A sort of repetitive learning, one which is not, per se, bad, it is just that you do not learn the background to the abbreviations. The same idea that you know what “is” is, without fully grasping the concept of “being” at the age of 4; I doubt one has started to read Heidegger at that point.

      Furthermore, from what I understand, the amount of teachers teaching K-5 grade (the age you learn a.m. and p.m. regardless if you are native or not) that know Latin is pretty limited. And even if they would, how many kids would like to know about the Latin roots of words before the age of the late teenage years?

      So on the whole, your claim that teaching levels are low as people have to ask what a.m. and p.m. means is simply ludicrous. That most west world educational systems need an uplift is clear, but that is not the reason why. We ask because we want to know, because we are driven enough – is this not enough to thank the educational system for?

      And as a final disclaimer, underpaying teachers will definitely not encourage teachers to firstly learn and then teach, Latin

      Reply
      • John -  May 28, 2015 - 9:52 am

        You should say the “number” of teachers, not the “amount” of teachers.

        Reply
  36. pharrell williams -  May 23, 2015 - 10:44 pm

    very nice!!!
    nearly as good as my song happy!!

    Reply
    • Hi -  May 26, 2015 - 3:12 pm

      Yeah right, like you’re Pharrell Williams…sorry if that was rude, I’m not a rude person I hope

      Reply
  37. Mr. James Escorpizo -  May 23, 2015 - 1:33 pm

    i am here in LIBYA ! so why this important am or pm ?

    Reply
    • Anna -  May 27, 2015 - 12:21 am

      Mr. James Escorpizo,
      I am not sure that where you are domiciled has much to do with correct English. We are simply discussing a subject that does require some learning as it is quite hard really to learn..
      I’m sure that most folk who post here are more than aware that there are some awful ‘things’ going on in our world that are far more important than correct language.
      Let our minds rest awhile. Allow a little latitude or perhaps, move to another area, that will not offend.
      Good luck to you
      A

      Reply
    • Chuck -  May 27, 2015 - 4:57 pm

      Just having a little fun splitting hairs. :)

      Reply
  38. Vivi -  May 23, 2015 - 3:37 am

    Hi, Born and bred i UK and never been in doubt. Middag is 12 a.m. and midnight is 12 p.m
    New day starts AFTER midnight otherwise known as 24 hundred hours when clock starts counting from the beginning again.The 24-hour clock also shows midnight as being the end of the day.

    Reply
    • Joe -  May 27, 2015 - 1:41 pm

      Incorrect, Vivi. While 12:00:00.0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 (following 11:59:59PM) is instantaneously neither a.m. nor p.m., 12:00:00.00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000001 (I added a 1 at the end the second time) is after midnight and therefore midnight is assigned 12:00a.m., not p.m.

      Reply
      • Vivi -  May 30, 2015 - 3:17 am

        Answer to Joe – after 23.59 comes 24.00 otherwise known as midnight. 23.59 is also 11.59 pm. so logically 12.00/24.00 (24-hour clock) must be pm (12 pm). Even if technically a digital clock shows 00.00 (nothing) you first start counting from 00.01 which is now am.

        Reply
  39. FIresword -  May 22, 2015 - 6:38 pm

    I typed this to find the time and day

    Reply
  40. john -  May 22, 2015 - 2:28 pm

    “a.m. refers to the hours from midnight and noon, and p.m. to the hours from noon and midnight” — from midnight and noon to what? from noon and midnight TO WHAT?
    Wouldn’t it be better to write, “from midnight to noon” etc.? Or “between midnight and noon” etc.?

    Reply
  41. D. Sierra -  May 22, 2015 - 8:13 am

    always informatively refreshing, I almost forgot. thanks dictionary!

    Reply
    • the big man 5003 -  May 22, 2015 - 8:37 am

      no it doesnt

      Reply
    • William Ben Hall -  May 23, 2015 - 6:30 am

      AntiMeridian & Private Message or Post Meridian.

      Ante Meridian & Private Message or Post Meridian.

      Reply
    • geeta nambiar -  May 23, 2015 - 11:02 am

      thank you for this

      we were taught in school ( an aeon ago ) that 12 pm and 12 am were wrong and the correct terms were we 12 noon and 12 midnight or just noon and midnight.

      i have seen 12pm and 12 am used in respected publications and thought editing was required not realizing that the terms are was now accepted

      geeta

      Reply
      • Chuck -  May 27, 2015 - 5:04 pm

        geeta, I think you were taught right, especially for normal everyday clear conversation. However, newscasters are reproached by those who require clearer and more precise etymology due to their responsibilities.

        Reply
    • Joe mawela -  May 24, 2015 - 4:36 am

      Great! I have known now…kikikikiki so everything is Latin? Lol

      Reply
    • actually -  May 24, 2015 - 10:52 pm

      I feel you. I was totally trying to rember and i couldn’t.

      Reply
    • sienna -  May 25, 2015 - 10:58 pm

      hi debra you don’t no me but i think that was really good sentences that you did my name is sienna and i am 13 years old it is nice to meet you thanks!!!

      Reply
    • sienna -  May 25, 2015 - 11:09 pm

      hi my name is sienna we have similar names i am 13 years old and it is good to have a dictionary they rock!!!!

      Reply
    • bob -  May 26, 2015 - 3:49 am

      you just shut up

      from: Dictionary

      Reply
      • Bill -  May 26, 2015 - 2:52 pm

        Bob !(from dictionary)

        Why you so meant to the 13 years old girl( siena), I know that name id fake
        Be polite man!

        Reply
  42. Debra -  May 22, 2015 - 3:38 am

    I actually learned this in school. But since I am over fifty, that was a while back when teachers actually taught their students and did not send work home for parents to teach. As for the human who thinks that this is “useless information” , if someone sent you a letter, requesting you to be at a certain place at a certain time and left out the a.m. or p.m., how would you know when to arrive? Anyway, I enjoy this site and it keeps me fresh on vocabulary. Thanks!

    Reply
    • the big man 5003 -  May 22, 2015 - 8:46 am

      are you 21 years old?

      Reply
    • Harvey Wachtel -  May 22, 2015 - 10:10 am

      Maybe you’re old enough (I’m 71) to remember that they also taught us that 12 PM (I think that’s how we learned to write it) was midnight of the ending day, not noon (which was, as the article says, 12 M). That never made sense to me even in grade school because the interval was closed at the wrong end. How could 12:00:00.00000000 be PM of Wednesday and 12:00:00.00000001, or .0000000000001, or whatever, be AM of Thursday? The advent of digital clocks seems to have straightened that out, but I can’t find anyone else who remembers being taught that 12 PM is midnight. I swear I’m not making it up.

      Now if we can only get the US to join the civilized world in using 24-hour notation; I just can’t get my head around a system where 12 comes before 11. Honest, Europeans really tell time that way, even informally. I once asked a dock attendant in Berlin how late a certain ferry runs and he answered “bis zwanzig Uhr” (until 20 hours)

      Reply
      • O Jagannadh -  May 26, 2015 - 9:05 pm

        Ha ha ha

        Reply
      • kim -  May 28, 2015 - 11:32 pm

        Thank you Harvey Watchel! You provided me with a flashback that clarifies why I have spent the past 40+ years confused about whether 12 a.m. is noon or midnight and whether 12 p.m. is noon or midnight.
        I too was a victim of the time-shifters (not to be confused with shape-shifters). As an elementary student in the early 60′s we were very much taught 12 p.m. was midnight. To the best of my knowledge 12 p.m. was midnight because it was at night. I don’t recall if I was actually taught that or just assumed it.
        Now I just reference the midday time as ’12N’ in written correspondence and ‘noon’ verbally. I usually reference midnight as midnight instead of 12M but then again, it’s not a time of day that I often experience.

        Reply
      • Rochelle W -  May 29, 2015 - 8:28 pm

        After clicking on the popup message asking if I knew what a.m. and p.m. stood for–yes, I did, having learned it and basic Latin in my 1972 4th grade class–I found this interesting discussion. I can’t remember what I was taught for describing 12:00 exact noon or midnight, or whether to use p.m. or a.m. For fun of it, I decided to look through old newspapers online, to see how 12:00 noon and midnight was handled back then. After all, ship and train schedules and early radio programs ran on set schedules, predating computer time.

        At http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov newspapers supported some of what Codobad mentioned. However, in an example I saw, apparently, newspapers had no set abbreviation for noon and midnight. Or the newspaper editor didn’t know to use “N” for midday. A 1 April 1921 New York Times ship schedule listed time of “mail closes” (deadline to get mail on board ship) and 3 to 3 1/2 hours later, time vessel sails. For “8:00 AM” and “8:30 AM” mail closings, ships left at “12:00 M”–which in this case would mean 12 noon.

        As for Harvey and Kim’s comments…In a 1 July 1910 Everett, WA newspaper is an “Interurban Time Table” which lists 17 daily 2 hr train trips from Everett to Seattle. One hour after the “11:AM” train left Everett, there was another leaving at “12:00 AM” which arrived in Seattle at “2:00 PM.” Then list finally gets to last train from Everett at “10:00 PM” arriving in Seattle at “12:00 PM.” This wasn’t the first newspaper where I saw similar schedules that had noon as AM and midnight as PM.

        It’s possible the modern “a.m.” and “p.m.” standards were already in place by time Kim was in school (I started school last year of the 60s) but students were taught what their teacher had been taught the prior generation. I don’t remember how I was taught…and at that time, it was of no importance to me. I was only awake at 12:00 noon, so that’s all I needed to know then. But now I’m older and often stay up to 12:00 a.m. surfing the Internet. :-P

        Reply
    • frank -  May 22, 2015 - 4:24 pm

      bein why their is military clock

      Reply
    • Tor Sovik -  May 23, 2015 - 9:35 pm

      Neat point, and nice to know how it used to be. Thank you for that. But, I guess we could use a 24h clock model (21:10)?

      Reply
    • koiyin -  May 23, 2015 - 11:54 pm

      well said. I find it very true

      Reply
    • Cheryl -  May 24, 2015 - 6:41 am

      So what is the answer Debra? What does the “a” mean in a.m. and what does the “m” mean in a.m.?

      Reply
      • vynl -  May 27, 2015 - 8:45 am

        look at the article

        Reply
    • Danish -  May 26, 2015 - 12:11 am

      but i remember this concept that when we use am. or pm

      Reply
    • Nancy -  May 26, 2015 - 9:19 am

      The Common Core would ask students to think critically about the time they should arrive – would it make sense to attend a dinner party at 6 o’clock in the morning?

      Reply
      • kim -  May 28, 2015 - 11:45 pm

        So Nancy, what critical thinking skills will my student employees use when they see their Saturday shift is from 6-12 (store hours are 6 a.m. ’til Midnight)? Think I should clarify for them 12 a.m. or 12 p.m. and hope the were taught which is noon and which is midnight?

        Reply
        • Chuck -  June 1, 2015 - 6:15 pm

          I think your students should understand what you understand, that clarity in writing or speech delivery, one must try to understand what is going to be interpreted from that delivery, and in this case, there could be ambiguity with 12 a.m. and/or 12 p.m., therefore ushering in the word noon or midnight would clarify most situations. However, when one knows their audience, they should probably use the term most used by their group, for the sake of expediency and expediency only.
          It’s still very interesting to come to know that the ‘m’ is derived from the Latin. Seems Latin, and some of it’s by-products, are the foundation of a great part of our culture, and we’ve built upon that and have revised, reintegrated, and expanded our knowledge, skills, abilities and ways of functioning because of those great foundations.
          So-o-o, this discussion on the origin of a.m. and p.m. seems to serve as a way to appreciate those gifts resulting from our foundations.

          Reply
          • Jeanie -  June 4, 2015 - 9:07 am

            I agree with you, Chuck. And though I hated being forced to take Latin in (Catholic) school, over the years I’ve come to appreciate it as the foundation of our language. There are other languages that helped form modern-day English, but Latin is definitely the main one.

  43. Iqtidar -  May 22, 2015 - 12:31 am

    Wow finally I found what am I looking for …interesting

    Reply
    • No -  May 23, 2015 - 7:11 am

      Whaaaaaaaat? Don’t get what you mean?

      Reply
      • No -  May 23, 2015 - 7:13 am

        Wait you’re older than 50!…Debra

        Reply
        • vynl -  May 27, 2015 - 8:46 am

          haa

          Reply
          • vynl -  May 27, 2015 - 8:48 am

            B-O-Y-O-Y boyoy

          • vynl -  May 27, 2015 - 8:48 am

            what time is it

    • Hola como estas -  May 23, 2015 - 7:19 am

      ?Hola Debra como estas¿

      Reply
    • sienna -  May 25, 2015 - 11:05 pm

      hi Iqtidar you don’t no me but good on you you got want you wanted something intresting and i love intresting stuff anyway hi my name is sienna and i am 13 years old

      Reply
    • elis -  May 26, 2015 - 6:12 pm

      am after midnight . pm past midnight .

      Reply
  44. frank -  May 22, 2015 - 12:00 am

    a murphys luck poor me
    may the sun always great you in the face and the wind to ye back.

    Reply
    • notfrank -  May 23, 2015 - 2:47 am

      So sad that spell check cannot detect a misnomer.

      Reply
    • Sailor Quasar Superstar -  May 25, 2015 - 8:41 am

      I guess it’s “Murphys Luck” that I was born with the sun to great my face, cause I understand Midnight- has the word NIGHT in it, therefore referring to NIGHTTIME, when the sun is down. So obviously meri-deim is reference to mid-day, when the sun is out, ante-before (the sun is out) & post-after…do I need to go on?? I didn’t go to school 50 years ago, I just PAID ATTENTION. Or maybe a descendent of a Roman Goddess….

      Reply
      • George -  May 27, 2015 - 2:18 pm

        It is a good thing that during the French Revolution they did not get the Decimal Clock (10 hours) to be accepted universally. The did manage to get UTC accepted, though.

        Reply
  45. Rodrigo S Amayao 4 -  May 21, 2015 - 7:42 pm

    science meaning.

    Reply
  46. rodrigo S amayao 4 -  May 21, 2015 - 7:41 pm

    is true love is blind.

    Reply
  47. rodrigo amayao -  May 21, 2015 - 7:40 pm

    dictionary are good.

    Reply
  48. rodrigo amayao -  May 21, 2015 - 7:33 pm

    what is the meaning of a richness.

    Reply
    • frank -  May 22, 2015 - 4:48 pm

      true wealth and enrichment can never be levied, weighed, counted, or tallied.
      However the obtuse and acute meandering mongrels of lackluster knowledge and wisdom comprehend only the nil voids of shallow waters.
      to wit decrease of diseased dull dun drums darken their delight.
      do they even know i ponder pointlessly. perhaps peer poison perpetuates per their person.
      consider haste is to waste. so caution rues the day if tomorrow you eagerly search the day. for the oneness of a pair melded intertwined. contented saturation overflowing when the way fare cannot be levied, weighed, counted, or tallied.

      for when the greatness of love is realized far to much there be.

      Reply
      • Joe -  May 27, 2015 - 1:47 pm

        Well said, you cunning linguist!

        Reply
      • Chuck -  May 27, 2015 - 5:32 pm

        I think that the first paragraph was written during the a.m. and the second during the p.m. while the third right at 00:00 because love don’t last too long. just saying.

        Reply
    • actually -  May 24, 2015 - 10:54 pm

      how rich you are

      Reply
  49. rodrigo amayao -  May 21, 2015 - 7:32 pm

    A.M is morning and P.M is midnight.

    Reply
    • Anne -  May 23, 2015 - 1:09 pm

      P.M. is not midnight. It means “post meridiem,” or, “after noon.” A.M. means “ante meridiem,” or, “before noon.”

      Reply
    • actually -  May 24, 2015 - 10:50 pm

      ahhhh no.

      Reply
    • Dolfin Lover -  May 26, 2015 - 8:30 am

      duh

      Reply
  50. OldNassau -  May 21, 2015 - 5:15 pm

    “ubiquitous” = omnipresent; everywhere.

    Reply
    • notfrank -  May 23, 2015 - 2:53 am

      “irrelevant” = posting a definition to a dictionary website.

      Reply
      • Joe -  May 27, 2015 - 1:48 pm

        Good one.

        Reply
  51. Sharlene -  May 21, 2015 - 4:46 pm

    This actually is the same way in Japanese as well :) the kanji used for AM and PM literally mean “noon before” and “noon after”

    Reply
    • Darrell Anderson -  May 22, 2015 - 9:25 am

      agreed

      Reply
    • Harvey Wachtel -  May 22, 2015 - 9:58 am

      I’m disillusioned. I thought the U.S. was the only country primitive enough to use the weird 12-hour notation when writing times (makes sense on an analog dial, but that’s about it), Do the Japanese also think that 12 comes before 11?

      Reply
      • Joe -  May 27, 2015 - 1:50 pm

        12 is one hour past 11, why do you keep saying it comes before? That is like two racers, one is nearly twice as fast as the second and does just under two laps while the other only does one, yet the slower racer claims to cross the finish line first….it’s nonsensical.

        Reply
    • actually -  May 24, 2015 - 10:56 pm

      hi, do youknow where i can get some japanese lessons ive started learning it… kanitchewwa

      Reply
    • Dolfin Lover -  May 26, 2015 - 8:30 am

      :) :) :) that’s cool :) :) :)

      Reply
    • Dolfin Lover -  May 26, 2015 - 8:31 am

      :) :) :) that is so cool :) :) :)

      Reply
  52. lilliana -  May 21, 2015 - 4:22 pm

    what am i doing here?

    Reply
    • frank -  May 22, 2015 - 4:48 pm

      ?

      Reply
    • Robin -  May 25, 2015 - 9:02 pm

      Good question

      Reply
    • Dolfin Lover -  May 26, 2015 - 8:32 am

      I dont know :(

      Reply
    • Chuck -  June 1, 2015 - 6:29 pm

      learning

      Reply
  53. Matt Knighton -  May 21, 2015 - 3:42 pm

    I thoroughly enjoy and appreciate your informative posts. I’ve written professionally for decades, but still learn helpful hints, tips, & clues. Keep it coming.

    Reply
    • Chuck -  June 1, 2015 - 6:33 pm

      You know what you’re doing here is learning. Good that you derive something from this discussion! I’m doing the same in my retirement and at my own pace – so enriching.

      Reply
  54. shaunyshaun -  May 21, 2015 - 12:08 pm

    Leaving comment to acknowledge your efforts.. thank you.. :]

    And on a completely irrelevant note and out of duty.. Support my Rap group- Ripples Of Styx, on Youtube…. Thanks alot.. Really.. Thanks for reading this comment.. Thank you.. Thank you very much.. You’re a wonderful person.. thank you… Thank you for your support.. Thank you.. You’re such a generous being I know i can say it with full confidence that you went and subscribed to our channel.. Also liked our page on facebook.. Wow.. You’re so benevolent.. You must be an angel.. You ARE an angel.. Because you subscribes to our channel, liked our facebook page and spread the word.. Wow man.. Thanks.. Thank you.. i owe you.. I’ll take a bullet for you, cuz i know you helped me.. I can trust you.. Thanks.. Thank you.. Thanks

    Reply
    • shaunyshaun -  May 21, 2015 - 12:12 pm

      Thanks man. Thanks.. Woah.. Thanks a ton.. Thanks.. Hohowoah.. Thanks wow.. Thank you.. Thank you so much.. Thanks.. Hey.. Thanks.. Thank you.. Thank.. Than.. Tha..t.. Man.. Thanks.. Yeah.. Thanks.. Very.. Much.. Yes.. Thanks.. whoo..! Thanks! Thanks!

      Reply
      • actually -  May 24, 2015 - 10:57 pm

        i subscribed where’s my thanks

        Reply
      • Danish -  May 26, 2015 - 12:15 am

        hehehehe very funny reply shaunyshaun madam i like it

        Reply
    • frank -  May 22, 2015 - 4:50 pm

      salty?

      Reply
    • Firesword -  May 22, 2015 - 7:01 pm

      how do we know you’re the real shaunyshaun? and how do you know that something like this in dictionary.com would be useful to you at all? I hope u aren’t desparate

      Reply
    • yomoma -  May 24, 2015 - 7:19 am

      well that’s what rap is all about, repeating a bunch of ignorant shit

      Reply
  55. speed racer -  May 21, 2015 - 11:45 am

    Just switch to the 24 hour clock:

    1pm = 1300
    2pm = 1400
    3pm – 1500

    Very easy, no misperception.

    Reply
    • chris elliott -  May 22, 2015 - 6:15 pm

      Until you get to midnight. There is no zero hour or 2400!

      Reply
    • Dolfin Lover -  May 26, 2015 - 8:34 am

      I know right

      Reply
  56. Larry -  May 21, 2015 - 10:59 am

    Am and Pm mean…

    (A.M.) ante meridian

    (P.M.)post meridiem

    Reply
    • Aryan -  May 26, 2015 - 4:14 pm

      Hi

      Reply
  57. Eli -  May 20, 2015 - 6:52 pm

    Why are the comments on this page so weird? There’s like, one normal comment, from Bob. The rest of you sound like you have some issues.

    Reply
    • Eli -  May 20, 2015 - 6:53 pm

      Kel also. Kel’s comment is normal.

      Reply
      • Ana Florez -  May 24, 2015 - 6:03 pm

        Thanks for help me to learn.
        Thank you very much.

        Reply
    • the big man 5003 -  May 22, 2015 - 8:44 am

      hello eli maneely

      Reply
  58. Wolfgang Cable -  May 20, 2015 - 7:37 am

    I find the where about of words very interesting.

    Reply
    • bluemax -  May 21, 2015 - 2:20 pm

      One day Mom ask me to pick up my uncle tomorrow at the bus station at 7 o’clock so next day. So I was on time I thought. After and hour are two I call Mom to see if she had heard something from her brother. She hadn’t. I ask her could it had been 7 pm. Didn’t know. So I went back that night and there he was. Home from the war.
      From that time the only time use is the 24 clock. You can’t go wrong. Keep it simply.

      Reply
      • vejacks -  May 25, 2015 - 11:51 pm

        bluemax, I fully agree with you. One day my telephone’s alarm went off at 3:00 a.m waking me up out of a deep sleep., for a meeting that I had at 3:00 p.m. that day; from that day to this I use the 24 hour system on my telephone…

        Reply
    • Jordan -  May 21, 2015 - 10:06 pm

      Wolfgang, pick up a book in a store or online on the etymology of words. You will enjoy it. My favorite is the etymology of the word cocktail. It makes perfect sense for the time period in which it was born.

      Reply
  59. Wolfgang Cable -  May 20, 2015 - 7:35 am

    I like this, and find it very interesting.
    Wolfgang

    Reply
    • frank -  May 21, 2015 - 11:53 pm

      me too also
      just a wonderment i suppose

      Reply
      • DarkFazeBoss -  May 25, 2015 - 12:47 am

        Sucks can you put the meaning of faze

        Reply
  60. Kel -  May 20, 2015 - 6:48 am

    What about using 12 noon or 12 midnight? Longer but less likely to be misunderstood.

    Reply
    • Jt -  May 20, 2015 - 3:20 pm

      Huh? Is 12 a.m. or 12 p.m. too much of a linguistical entanglement for you to sort out? Are you one of those people who gets confused at midnight and doesn’t know when to say if it is a.m. or p.m.?

      I’m just razzin’ ya, Kel. If this made you mad, just take it out on a bad person somehow. HAHA!

      Reply
    • Derek Holland -  May 20, 2015 - 5:17 pm

      I find 12 p.m. confusing for midday, as p.m. translated is “AFTER” midday, when it is actually AT midday.

      Reply
    • Jabulani Jones -  May 21, 2015 - 3:29 pm

      That work good until it get to be like 1PM! :-)

      When I was in the Army we used twelve-hundred hours (noon) and twenty-four hours (midnight). It took some getting used to but I tell you what, once I got used to it, it made perfect sense and I still use it on my digital clocks, mobile devices, etc..

      But it’s also good to know what the A.M. and P.M. actually means. I asked my momma and she was so proud when I explained it to her–always good to make one’s momma proud!

      Peace out and to all.

      Reply
      • Cheryl -  May 24, 2015 - 6:49 am

        Ok. so what does each letter mean in a.m. and p.m. I know that a.m. stands for the first 12 hours of a 24 hour day and p.m. stands for the second 12 hours of a 24 hour day. However, no one has defined what the letters actually mean?

        Reply
        • Joe -  May 27, 2015 - 1:55 pm

          While I enjoy the comment section after most any article, if I were to comment, I find it better to actually read the article, as it generally addresses many questions asked in the comments, such as yours.

          seek and ye shall find

          Reply
    • Matt Knighton -  May 21, 2015 - 3:33 pm

      From my perspective, the longer version is more cumbersome and quite unnecessary. Anyone who doesn’t understand the am/pm designation is not up to 3rd or 4th grade speed in terms of this fundamental time concept. It might depend on the age/educational level of your reading audience.

      Reply
    • Mike -  May 21, 2015 - 4:04 pm

      I agree with Kel.
      When we’re talking 12 o’clock I think we should define it as noon or midnight unless it’s obvious from the context.

      Reply
    • Jordan -  May 21, 2015 - 9:57 pm

      Kel, most people take noon for 12 p.m. And, well, midnight is midnight, 12 a.m. The Witching Hour, lol.

      Reply
    • Rob -  May 22, 2015 - 1:19 am

      I would personally think in such instances, the ’12′ would be redundant as ‘noon’ and ‘midnight’ alone would imply the ’12′.

      Reply
    • Peter -  May 22, 2015 - 7:21 pm

      12 o’clock is neither a.m. nor p.m., so 12 a.m. and 12 p.m. are both inaccurate and dependent on a convention not universally agreed. What Kel suggests is accurate and clear, but 12 noon and 12 midnight are redundant as Rob observed. The indisputable expressions are 24-hour time that’s most acceptable internationally, or midnight and noon (Rob’s suggestion) instead of 12 o’clock for 12-hour time.

      Reply
      • Chuck -  June 1, 2015 - 7:03 pm

        I agree with you, however, colloquial speech usually has undertones of understanding so that things like a.m. and p.m. are not an issue. It’s when we communicate outwards from our ‘circle of friends’ that we sort of speak differently.
        Sometimes when we are overheard by little ones in the family, it stimulates the ‘I wonder’ part of their little minds and then we are faced with trying to decide upon an explanation. That’s when we can show them how they have this wondrous gift of being able to understand things, whether they be complex or simple. When they are led to be happy with their understandings, they’ll go for more of that happy stuff until their bucket is full. Doesn’t matter the size of the bucket – just the ‘filling’ it with fun stuff. .

        Reply
  61. benjamin pequignot -  May 20, 2015 - 6:42 am

    Dont quite understand W.T.F. is really happening but I do believe that something is a little off, im not exactly sure what it is(actually I do it’s EVERYTHING. Car be it from me to cry about th hings so I’ll shut up. I never really wanted to know the difference between the two a.m. And p.m..:-) more useless stuff to float around in my head, thanks. Have a nice day.

    Reply
    • bozz dude -  May 20, 2015 - 5:47 pm

      PEDRO ESTA BIEN PERO ENRIQUE TIENE CATARRO

      Reply
      • the big man 5003 -  May 22, 2015 - 8:42 am

        what the

        Reply
    • Matt Knighton -  May 21, 2015 - 3:37 pm

      If you never bothered to understand the difference btw am/pm how on earth do you make it to work on time or meet your appointment obligations?

      Reply
  62. benjamin pequignot -  May 20, 2015 - 6:36 am

    I don’t know what to do in my life, but I will let her go to the only way to get your friends and family members who have been in the same boat as well as a big fan of y you need me and I don’t have to work in a few hours, I can get back on track for a while to do it for you guys, but I will let her go to the only thing that you need to get the only thing that you need to get the only thing that you need to get the only thing that you need to get a chance for me to get a good time with you and I can see it in the first half of this year and your family

    Reply
    • benjamin pequignot -  May 20, 2015 - 6:45 am

      Whatever. That last one sounded a little loopy, I was just pressing words to try to make sentences, don ft be a jerk:-).

      Reply
    • benjamin pequignot -  May 20, 2015 - 7:02 am

      Whatever. That last one sounded a little loopy, I was just pressing words to try to make sentences, don ft be a jerk:-), and whomever owns smiths grocery store in fort spache and flamingo needs to give your entire staff a HUGE raise it was an excellent experiance. They were all awesome.

      Reply
      • Jt -  May 20, 2015 - 3:13 pm

        Spache*, Flamingo*, don’t*, Smith’s*, experience*

        DON’T take it personally if English isn’t your native tongue! However, I would LOVE for you to take it very seriously so it absolutely ruins the rest of your week. HAHA!! I’m kidding, dude. Just being an a-hole.

        Reply
      • Rob -  May 20, 2015 - 6:12 pm

        Are you on crack, it’s simple English.Go back to sleep my friend.

        Reply
      • Bahima -  May 21, 2015 - 6:33 am

        Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

        Reply
      • Rob -  May 22, 2015 - 1:20 am

        Remember, kids: don’t eat mushrooms you find in the forest.

        Reply
        • the big man 5003 -  May 22, 2015 - 8:41 am

          why

          bro

          Reply
        • the big man 5003 -  May 22, 2015 - 8:41 am

          why

          Reply
        • Firesword -  May 22, 2015 - 6:55 pm

          yea you eat magic mushrooms in the city instead. there’re tons of those.

          Reply
  63. Ahab Ismail -  May 20, 2015 - 12:56 am

    Acually this is avery useful activity for Second language English speakers and to download it as software programme will more efficient

    Reply
    • John -  May 22, 2015 - 1:20 am

      Ahab,
      Glad to hear that YOU are one of those who really appreciate LEARNING! Congratulations. I hate to see idiots/jerks who have no interest in increasing their knowledge of a 2nd, 3rd, 4th or more languages.
      I live in California, and worked in restaurant for 40+ years. In that field of work in this area, you have many Latinos who DO NOT take an interest in learning English. To a degree, I do understand. They are here primarily to work and earn money for their families. The types of work they do are those that do NOT require the language, such as house keeping, dish washing, bussing and so forth. Some DO show an interest in learning, and I would work with them in doing so. I myself DO NOT speak Spanish FLUENTLY, but in a manner that is comprehended. I may have given some person(s) directions around the hotel where I worked, and then apologized for my TERRIBLE Spanish. They would always respond “Oh no, that is fine. We understand and appreciate it.” My purpose is simply to help people. So when they would say that, I felt very happy. I never studied the language, but working with Latinos for so many years, many who would put forth no effort to learn English, made it necessary for me to do the best I could to learn “slang” Spanish in order to communicate.
      Have a GREAT DAY Ahab! Keep on learning. I try to learn just a little something each and every day. It’s more educational than one would think, AND it keeps your mind busy…….especially when you’re an antique. I’m 70 years old TODAY!!

      Reply
      • the big man 5003 -  May 22, 2015 - 8:40 am

        thats really long

        bro

        Reply
      • Sylvia -  May 22, 2015 - 10:36 am

        Happy Birthday John!

        Reply
    • John -  May 22, 2015 - 1:33 am

      Ahab,
      One of my friends in high school was an exchange student from Denmark. English was his 2nd language. We graduated 52 years ago, in 1963. He now speaks 5 languages. Four of them are Danish, English, German and French. I do not recall what his 5th language is. I admire him for having accomplished that.

      Reply
    • Joe -  May 27, 2015 - 1:59 pm

      Good for you trying to better yourself and learn more. Thank you.

      Reply
  64. Bob -  May 19, 2015 - 6:32 pm

    so its ante meridiem and post meridiem. cool.

    Reply
    • REALLY BOB -  May 20, 2015 - 5:16 pm

      nice name.

      Reply
    • Jordan -  May 21, 2015 - 10:01 pm

      Bob, don’t miss the long first i in both meridiems. It will sound awkward, but it will be correct.

      Reply
      • the big man 5003 -  May 22, 2015 - 8:39 am

        you are not air jordan

        bro and kenya if your still out there answer me !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

        Reply
    • Xxx_Cow_xxX -  May 23, 2015 - 6:45 pm

      Na it’s after midnight (am) and pre midnight (pm)

      Reply
  65. BRANCH -  May 19, 2015 - 6:02 pm

    NICE WEB

    Reply
  66. boby -  May 19, 2015 - 1:34 pm

    that is cool?

    Reply
    • bruhh -  May 24, 2015 - 6:34 pm

      bruhh.

      Reply
  67. linnea petaccaccio -  May 19, 2015 - 11:06 am

    Please send me daily Spanish dictionary thanks Linnea

    Reply
  68. linnea petaccaccio -  May 19, 2015 - 11:04 am

    Please send me Spanish dictionary thanks Linnea

    Reply
    • A -  May 24, 2015 - 4:47 pm

      Huh?

      Reply
    • bruhh -  May 24, 2015 - 6:33 pm

      bruh

      Reply

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