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In the News: Yeezus, Simile, and Metaphor

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If you’ve tuned in to the recent media blitz surrounding Kanye West and his new genre-bending, chart-topping album Yeezus, you may have picked up on a theme: this man likes to pronounce his greatness. He does it in a myriad of ways. In his recent compulsively quotable interview in New York Times, he did it by likening himself to Steve Jobs: “I am undoubtedly, you know, Steve of Internet, downtown, fashion, culture.” On his album, he takes it a step further with a ditty titled “I Am a God.”

Of course, Kanye West is neither Steve Jobs nor a god—not literally at least. In both of these examples, he is using a type of figurative speech that poets and lyricists have relied on since the dawn of language. It’s also one of the two most commonly confused literary devices in the English language. So is Kanye speaking in metaphor, or simile? Let’s review the difference between the two.

A metaphor is a figure of speech in which a term or phrase is applied to something to which it is not literally applicable in order to suggest a resemblance. For example, to borrow from another currently chart-topping musician, Justin Timberlake, the song title “Mirrors“ is a metaphor. Why? Because he’s using the word “mirror” to refer to a relationship—not to actual mirrors. The line in the song, “You’re my reflection,” is also a metaphor because the “you’re” to whom he’s referring is his lover, not his literal reflection.

However, if the above line were amended to “you’re like my reflection,” we would have a simile on our hands. A simile is a figure of speech in which two unlike things are explicitly compared—typically with the word “as” or “like.” So, for instance, in the same song, the line “your shine is somethin’ like a mirror” is a simile. Another lyrical example of simile that you might be familiar with comes courtesy of the Beatles: “It’s been a hard day’s night, and I’ve been working like a dog”—along with “sleeping like a log.”

So when Kanye says “I Am a God,” or “I am … Steve of Internet,” barring the outside chance that he believes these statements to be literal truths, he is speaking in metaphor. Like countless artists before him, he is employing figurative language to add dimension and resonance to his ideas—or to put it metaphorically, to give his ideas wings.

Do you have a favorite metaphor or simile from the radio? We want to hear about it. Share with us below.

89 Comments

  1. michael -  November 16, 2013 - 8:58 am

    When the word was used as any other word is used and the person to whom it is being used to understands it then it is correct . Does that make sense to anyone ? Thanksgiving

    Reply
  2. YouKnowMe -  July 16, 2013 - 4:19 pm

    P.S.
    I am HIGHLY amused by these comments; the audacity. “Yeezus” has clearly exercised his power on most of you given the fact you are annoyed and, if you will, jealous by a man who you claim to be foolish; that which we hate [on] we truly admire. His lyrics are cyphered and unless you are fully conscious of the subject matter you will remain to respond like fools. This has been more entertaining than “Yeezus” which I’m sure was his intentions #lmao

    Reply
  3. YouKnowMe -  July 16, 2013 - 4:08 pm

    #FYI Kanye is not being metaphoric. He has the esoteric belief that man is God in his right mind. That man is in the “image and likeness” therefore carries the qualities and power of The Most High. Figured you should be politically correct so not to dilute his poetic msg.

    Reply
  4. Pamela -  July 16, 2013 - 8:26 am

    I think the proper description would be blasphemer! He’s a demonic Racist with serious insecurities.

    Reply
  5. Corbusier -  July 15, 2013 - 11:06 pm

    This part of the site is called “In The News” so I’m assuming posts relate to current events. I see nothing wrong with using pop culture to teach.

    Reply
  6. Nasier -  July 15, 2013 - 2:32 pm

    @Larry so many of your favorite artist wouldn’t be famous if it wasn’t for Kanye

    Reply
  7. Alun Clewe -  July 15, 2013 - 1:08 pm

    Er… those criticizing the use of “myriad” may want to check out a dictionary themselves. “Myriad” may be correctly used as either a noun or an adjective; “a myriad of ways” is perfectly correct (although just “myriad ways” would also have been correct). In fact, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, the noun usage actually came first, going back at least as far as 1609 (when Alexander Craig wrote about “a miriad [sic] of mis-fortunes”). The use of myriad as an adjective, on the other hand, apparently didn’t arise till 1735.

    Reply
  8. Kim -  July 15, 2013 - 10:43 am

    the radio waves that exist outside of the radio, and the “brain” would be the radio itself. Let’s call it the “mind radio” model, with “mind waves” being interpreted by the “mind radio” (i.e. brain

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  9. Lauren S. -  July 15, 2013 - 9:10 am

    You know, everyone is being so mean to the author, when what you should really be doing is thinking, Wow! Maybe I’ll need that for the future.
    This person didn’t have to use Kanye West in their article. They could’ve just said the difference between a metaphor and a simile. But most of you are just going,
    OOPS! He made a booboo! Better not pay attention at all to what their saying!

    By the way, author dude, I liked it!

    Reply
  10. Sean -  July 15, 2013 - 5:52 am

    Don’t make arrogant comments ‘Gregg Rossetti’ & ‘Hummingbird’… the word ‘myriad’ is used as a noun in this context, not an adjective. It’s funny that you’re both being so quick to judge when you yourselves are clearly wrong..

    Reply
  11. Daniel Russaw -  July 15, 2013 - 1:34 am

    Kanye is telling the truth…he is a god. As a matter of fact…we all are gods.It says so in the Bible. “You all are gods, but you will die like mere men.”

    Reply
  12. Rotten Johnny -  July 15, 2013 - 1:27 am

    In response to a fellow poster and scholar:

    I would offer that garbage is actually a synonym for Kanye, wouldn’t you agree?

    To Hummingbird and all other illiterate morons:

    You’re all absolute morons. The only thing worse than a literacy snob is a literacy idiot trying to be a literacy snob. In this day and age, you don’t need to be a literacy snob to do a quick check on proper grammar. Your local Merriam-Webster or Oxford is available to reference at your fingertips. The usage of the word “myriad” is listed not only as an adjective in this online dictionary, but also as a noun. Furthermore, there are articles that you can find online, in less time than it takes to post moronic messages to the author of this article, that will explain to you that “a myriad of” has been a phrase used by authors with more credibility than either you or I have, and can be found in such works as Thoreau. The usage of the word “myriad” as a noun is in fact the older form of usage and dates back to the 16th century. This usage is widely accepted by more important people to the literary world than you and your pathetic credentials are. I guess I could say, “You are very ass” rather than, “You are an ass”–since you like to pull examples from your ass.

    So much in language changes and evolves through time. Imagine all that Shakespeare could criticize about our English today. Should we all walk around speaking like Shakespeare now? Jeez, everyone who posts on dictionary.com is a goddamn expert.

    Read more about the usage of Myriad here: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/myriad

    Go duke it out with Thoreau now, internet grammar warriors!

    Reply
  13. james b..atl -  July 14, 2013 - 11:14 pm

    Oh, joys arise

    The sun has come again to hold you

    Sailing out the doldrums of the week

    The polyphonic prairies here, it’s all around you

    It’s all around you, out here

    Read more: GORILLAZ – EMPIRE ANTS LYRICS
    believe its a metaphor ..because doldrums have two meanining..but the both meaning are used at the same time in this part of the verse

    Reply
  14. james b..atl -  July 14, 2013 - 11:14 pm

    Oh, joys arise

    The sun has come again to hold you

    Sailing out the doldrums of the [Incomprehensible]

    The polyphonic prairies here, it’s all around you

    It’s all around you, out here

    Read more: GORILLAZ – EMPIRE ANTS LYRICS
    believe its a metaphor ..because doldrums have two meanining..but the both meaning are used at the same time in this part of the verse

    Reply
  15. Mona -  July 14, 2013 - 4:40 pm

    I read through all the previous comments & just thought everyone should just lighten up a little & try to be a little less critical. If you’re that harsh on others, you’re most likely twice as hard on yourselves.

    Reply
  16. Drew -  July 14, 2013 - 1:39 pm

    Ermm I’m sorry but Kanye West IS a god. It is not a metaphor nor a simile. A god is an idea or object of worship. So you guys are either stereotypical of what a god is or have never defined god properly. In fact anything could be a god. Such as money, your wife/ husband, work, friends, status. These things have addictive properties as well hence so. Capital G god, maybe less to some. a god does pretty much accurately defines him to some people.

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  17. Drew -  July 14, 2013 - 1:35 pm

    Ermm I’m sorry but Kanye West IS a god. It is not a metaphor nor a simile. A god is an idea or object of worship. So you guys are either stereotypical of what a god is or have never defined god properly.

    Reply
  18. Rony -  July 14, 2013 - 10:39 am

    To all of the ignorant language snobs that “couldn’t read this article after [they] saw the grammatically erroneous statement” because “there is no such thing as “a myriad of ways”: you should “check the, uh, well, dictionary” yourselves. There’s a big assumption by persnicketers [sic] that ‘myriad’ is limited to be an adjective, not a noun, when in fact it is both.

    As a matter of fact, it was a noun LONG before it was used ‘metaphorically’ as an adjective. It comes from Greek for 10,000, so it’s original usage in English is comparable to ‘a large number’, ‘a load’, or ‘a horde’. It’s not until the 19th century that it started popping up as an adjective in poetry.

    It’s already bad enough (not to mention ignorant) to be a persnickety language snob. It’s way worse, however, when this is paired with an ignorance to the actual language principles you intend to defend.

    Reply
  19. Caleb -  July 14, 2013 - 10:20 am

    @Hummingbird and Gregg Rossetti
    Have you ever visited “myriad” in the dictionary? Maybe you’d be surprised to see it can be used as both an adjective and… wait for it… a noun!

    Maybe you should’ve looked it up first, just to verify? We are on dictonary.com afterall….

    Reply
  20. David -  July 14, 2013 - 9:47 am

    Kaynye West calling himself God shows just how stupid he is. If a person has to go around telling everyone that he is the best [or God] then they have proven that they are in fact not. It takes others to make that judgement, so long as it is not a popularty contest [wich are frauds].
    In the ’70s Eric Claption was called God by his fans and contempories, because of hie musical skill and talents. Claption, along with others, is still making music after fifity years. Compaired to previous Artists West has not proven himself through time. Mozart is still listened to!

    Reply
  21. Adam rahmat -  July 14, 2013 - 5:09 am

    The word GOD is for the one and the only creator, someone obsessed with happiness and fame is trying to use the word for himself in the name of metaphor y?

    Reply
  22. SnowCap -  July 13, 2013 - 6:56 pm

    More accurately put I think the statement, “I am God” is along the lines of
    blasphemy.

    Reply
  23. Miek Perez -  July 13, 2013 - 9:39 am

    This post is perfect

    Reply
  24. PC -  July 13, 2013 - 9:39 am

    Uh, Gregg–respectfully–that should be “whom can I trust.”

    Reply
  25. E -  July 13, 2013 - 8:50 am

    Metaphor — “I Am the Walrus” (Beatles)
    Simile — I am he as you are he as you are me and we are all together.
    - – - – -
    Metaphors — You never turned around to see the frowns on the jugglers and the clowns when they all came down to do tricks for you.
    Similes — Like a complete unknown; “Like a Rolling Stone”? (Dylan)

    Reply
  26. Joddelle Joseph -  July 13, 2013 - 8:43 am

    Myriad… one of the many meanings it possess’ is “ten thousand” just wondering, why can’t i say ten thousand of…? Myriad of…?

    Reply
  27. em -  July 13, 2013 - 8:29 am

    From “I Am the Walrus” (Beatles)….

    Simile: I am he as you are he as you are me….
    Metaphor: I am the eggman. They are the eggmen
    I am the walrus — Goo goo g’ joob

    Reply
  28. ECW -  July 13, 2013 - 8:23 am

    … like a rollin’ stone!

    Reply
  29. Ryan -  July 13, 2013 - 5:57 am

    One of the definitions of “myriad” is “n. a large, indefinite number”. Saying “a myriad,” is, therefore, grammatically correct.

    Reply
  30. Jess -  July 13, 2013 - 5:37 am

    To the grammar police, “myriad” can be both a noun or an adjective. According to the Oxford Dictionaries, using “a myriad of” something is acceptable. However, this takes away from the point of the article, which really is trying to make figurative language more understandable. It does so in a way that makes it easy to understand, one which I think can be extended to any type of music you prefer instead of Kanye West.

    Reply
  31. Kanu -  July 13, 2013 - 2:56 am

    Kanye is suffering extreme delusion of grandeur. This is not the first. I’ve heard him make uncouth comments about God before. He’s just ignorant. QED

    Reply
  32. Me -  July 13, 2013 - 1:04 am

    Isn’t saying “I am a Steve jobs” more of an eponym or other rhetorical device where a name is used as an adjective? I mean, I’m no Einstein but I think the rhetorical analysis here is imprecise.

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  33. Doris the Finkasaurus -  July 12, 2013 - 11:14 pm

    @ Hummingbird, J. Key, and Gregg Rossetti. You might want to check the dictionary yourself…
    A ‘myriad of ways’ is perfectly acceptable when used as a noun. It would be the same as writing ‘a large number of ways.’
    Used as an adjective, which the author did not do, would be incorrect. For the fun of it, you should type ‘myriad of ways’ into Google to see that grammarians have beat this topic to death.

    Reply
  34. Steve -  July 12, 2013 - 6:56 pm

    From Wikipedia-

    In English, the term “myriad” is most commonly used to refer to a large number of an unspecified size. In this way “myriad” can be used as either an adjective or a noun.[1] Thus both “there are myriad people outside” and “there is a myriad of people outside” are correct.

    Merriam-Webster notes, “Recent criticism of the use of myriad as a noun, both in the plural form myriads and in the phrase a myriad of, seems to reflect a mistaken belief that the word was originally and is still properly only an adjective…. however, the noun is in fact the older form, dating to the 16th century. The noun myriad has appeared in the works of such writers as Milton (plural myriads) and Thoreau (a myriad of), and it continues to occur frequently in reputable English.”

    Reply
  35. Bubba -  July 12, 2013 - 5:58 pm

    That was funnier than a phart in a fonebooth. Do I sim a smellerie?

    Reply
  36. OfMyriad -  July 12, 2013 - 2:02 pm

    To those complaining, “myriad” can be used as both an adjective and a noun. “a myriad of ways” would be “a great number of ways.”

    Just because it’s more commonly used as an adjective doesn’t mean the noun form is wrong. Good day.

    Reply
  37. Lynn -  July 12, 2013 - 1:30 pm

    It’s a good idea to look things up before calling someone out for being wrong, especially in a public forum:

    From Merriam-Webster: “Recent criticism of the use of myriad as a noun, both in the plural form myriads and in the phrase a myriad of, seems to reflect a mistaken belief that the word was originally and is still properly only an adjective…. however, the noun is in fact the older form, dating to the 16th century.”

    Reply
  38. Rabiyah -  July 12, 2013 - 11:43 am

    Oh stop it, haters! I think this was an excellent example to use. Otherwise, I wouldn’t have cared to read it. And now I will probably remember the difference lol thanks!

    Reply
  39. Notmyrealname -  July 12, 2013 - 10:37 am

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/myriad

    The author’s use of “myriad” can be interpreted in a way that makes it correct. Nitpicking someone else’s grammar is rarely helpful unless the grammar is bad enough to render their message unintelligible.

    Reply
  40. denise -  July 12, 2013 - 10:23 am

    well, according to dictionary.com, “myriad” is both a noun and an adjective, so it seems like the above usage is correct, as in “a number of ways.”

    and how about stevie wonder: “you are the sunshine of my life.”

    Reply
  41. Alfredo Estrella -  July 12, 2013 - 8:49 am

    I don’t know who ‘Kanye West’ is. I do appreciate the gift of Gab. He ain’t Irish ; is he? As for the other weenie, Justin. Who cares? I do not.

    Reply
  42. Aris Petropolis -  July 12, 2013 - 8:46 am

    Unlike ‘numerous, countless, et cetera’, I’ve always understood ‘myriad’ to be both an adjective and a noun. Used as it is in this instance I fail to see the problem.

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  43. Danil -  July 12, 2013 - 7:27 am

    He is a child of his god, the devil

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  44. Language Lover -  July 12, 2013 - 1:07 am

    Uh, let’s see. To all the people saying that “a myriad of ways” is incorrect, that use is perfectly correct. Go check it wherever you want, in any dictionary or specialised site. “Myriad”, as a noun, can be perfectly used like that.

    Reply
  45. IMJG -  July 11, 2013 - 11:07 pm

    “This simply continues the mindless celebrity worship our young children are growing up with. Why not use someone in education, science, hey maybe even literature…”

    Because to young children, people in education (please!), science, and literature are boring. There’s no better way to get someone to instantly tune you out than to start with the words “you know, John Dewey, Robert Oppenheimer, and Oscar Wilde all said…”

    If you want to teach, and not just preach, then you have to send the message to where kids live today, not where you’d like them to live tomorrow. (Unless, of course, you’re talking about the use of the word “myriad.” Then all bets are off.)

    Reply
  46. Mrs. St. Laurent -  July 11, 2013 - 10:04 pm

    To “Really”: You hit it on the head, sweetheart. Your grammar is imperfect, but your sentiments are right on! Kanye seems to be perhaps manic, on legal (or other) ego-inflating drugs, or else he truly believes that he has achieved a god-like ability and presence here on Earth. If Kanye, or any of us, were to face the true and living God…we would be unable to stand due to his immeasurable glory, radiance, power, and holiness. I pray that Kanye DOES have an encounter with the true God of the universe. Otherwise, I suggest and know that dark forces who would destroy Kanye, will continue to pump his silly, human ego up and make him impervious to the real, living Light. Kanye may be a Narcissist. If so, he needs a nice dose of reality. I hope that the person who can set him straight comes Kanye’s way, and soon. He is like Icarus, and we know the fate that flying too high with wax wings brings. Peace! Love to all.

    Reply
  47. Victoria -  July 11, 2013 - 8:45 pm

    I defend our author here. Myriad can be used as both an adjective and a noun. It is derived from Greek, where it meant, and still does, “countless”, “infinate”, but has morphed in English and other languages (as languages do) to mean also “an unspecified great number” (check your Merriam-Webster. “A myriad of X” is used as an example in the dictionary of proper useage.

    Reply
  48. rianal -  July 11, 2013 - 6:45 pm

    you might mitigate your misuse of myriad by examining the difference between qualitative and quantitative meaning.
    cheers

    Reply
  49. Righteous king -  July 11, 2013 - 6:30 pm

    Kayne west is saying what elijah muhammad and the nation of islam theology of the blackman being the original man and is god meaning the supreme being blackman

    Reply
  50. Johnno -  July 11, 2013 - 5:29 pm

    Sorry Hummingbird, the author is correct. Myriad is singular myriads is plural. The myriads of bees in the hive. You might notice similarities if you directly substitue synonyms (i.e. muriad > multitude; it would be done in a multitude of ways not in multitude ways) as-is, directly substituting (a large number) to your referenced statement of: “He does it in a myriad ways.” we would have “He does it in a large number of way” versus your “He does it in myriad ways” would incorrectly be “He does it in large number ways” which has large characterizing number instead.

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  51. MoJo -  July 11, 2013 - 4:26 pm

    In English, the term “myriad” is most commonly used to refer to a large number of an unspecified size. In this way “myriad” can be used as either an adjective or a noun.[1] Thus both “there are myriad people outside” and “there is a myriad of people outside” are correct.[2]

    Merriam-Webster notes, “Recent criticism of the use of myriad as a noun, both in the plural form myriads and in the phrase a myriad of, seems to reflect a mistaken belief that the word was originally and is still properly only an adjective…. however, the noun is in fact the older form, dating to the 16th century. The noun myriad has appeared in the works of such writers as Milton (plural myriads) and Thoreau (a myriad of), and it continues to occur frequently in reputable English.”[2]

    Reply
  52. Codie -  July 11, 2013 - 1:51 pm

    Dont forget egotistical

    Reply
  53. ... -  July 11, 2013 - 11:52 am

    Myriad is being used as a noun.

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  54. Ellenburg -  July 11, 2013 - 11:48 am

    There is a point there that points to there being no true editing of errors such as the ‘a myriad of ways’ fax pas’ in the above story. It would be comforting to know that dictionary.com learns from the above shitstorm (Angela Merkel favorite word).

    Help!

    Reply
  55. Fuzz -  July 11, 2013 - 11:18 am

    I agree with the improper use of the word “myriad”. Get it together guys, really.

    However, I find hilarious all the comments about Kanye himself, as if the article is a critique of his character. The article is about similes and metaphors. Whether Kanye (or Kayne as many here seem to have taken to calling him) is a buffoon or not is not the subject of the article, so give it a rest. Yeezus.

    Reply
  56. Rajvir -  July 11, 2013 - 8:10 am

    Well, yeah, I’m hoping and praying he’s talking metaphorically. I would deem him as simply insane if he really thought he was a God… just a tad bit full of yourself… xD

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  57. bookbeater -  July 11, 2013 - 7:29 am

    perhaps a better comparison would be hubris or hyperbole?

    Reply
  58. Donny -  July 11, 2013 - 7:02 am

    Whatever Kanye says is racist….so I guess its neither a metaphor or simile.

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  59. Bryant -  July 11, 2013 - 5:49 am

    This is from Merriam-Webster

    This is for the people who were trying to point out the “inaccurate” use of Myriad

    Usage Discussion of MYRIAD

    Recent criticism of the use of myriad as a noun, both in the plural form myriads and in the phrase a myriad of, seems to reflect a mistaken belief that the word was originally and is still properly only an adjective. As the entries here show, however, the noun is in fact the older form, dating to the 16th century. The noun myriad has appeared in the works of such writers as Milton (plural myriads) and Thoreau (a myriad of), and it continues to occur frequently in reputable English. There is no reason to avoid it

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  60. Dylan -  July 10, 2013 - 6:00 pm

    2 Tim 3:1 KJV – This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come.
    For men shall be lovers of their own selves, covetous, boasters, proud, blasphemers, disobedient to parents, unthankful, unholy….Ever learning, and never able to come to the knowledge of the truth. Now as Jannes and Jambres withstood Moses, so do these also resist the truth: men of corrupt minds, reprobate concerning the faith.

    Reply
  61. Dylan -  July 10, 2013 - 5:59 pm

    2 Tim 3:1 KJV – This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come.
    For men shall be lovers of their own selves, covetous, boasters, proud, blasphemers, disobedient to parents, unthankful, unholy

    Reply
  62. Rose -  July 10, 2013 - 2:38 pm

    “Genre-bending, chart-topping….” Really? Kanye and Timberlake? This is what children and adults have to see on Dictionary.com? Leave it to the mindless gossip magazines, please.

    “…employing figurative language to add dimension and resonance to his ideas.”

    Mindless celeb worship, indeed. My god….

    Reply
  63. Lynne -  July 10, 2013 - 2:36 pm

    “Genre-bending, chart-topping….” Really? Kanye and Timberlake? This is what children and adults have to see on Dictionary.com? Leave it to the mindless gossip magazines, please.

    Reply
  64. AC -  July 10, 2013 - 2:28 pm

    Disappointing to see the likes of Mr. West (who’s a rapper, not a pop star, right?!) on an educational website. That seems to be a bit of a contradiction.

    Reply
  65. Ray -  July 10, 2013 - 1:50 pm

    The gods lived ten-times-longer, some a hundred-times-longer, than ordinary mankind (900 or 9000 vs. 90) and so said-to-be ‘immortal’… but they were in no rush to be, immortal.

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  66. Fara -  July 10, 2013 - 1:07 pm

    Thought police: myriad is both a noun and an adjective. The author used it in the nounal sense, though “a myriad of ways” and “in myriad ways” are both correct. One is just preferable to the other, depending on the speaker or context.

    As for my opinions on Kanye West… I’d rather not test the potential character limits of this comment box.

    Reply
  67. Anne -  July 10, 2013 - 1:06 pm

    Thanks for clarifying what a metaphor and a simile is.

    ‘Myriad’ can be used as both a noun and an adjective.

    Larry’s comment is a metaphor, right?

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  68. Lance -  July 10, 2013 - 12:53 pm

    There is nothing wrong with “a myriad” since “myriad” is both an adjective and a noun. It is a versatile word.

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  69. fran -  July 10, 2013 - 12:22 pm

    The “G” in God needs to be a lowercase.
    There is only one God but there are many gods.

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  70. Scott -  July 10, 2013 - 11:03 am

    “Myriad” has been used as a noun since the mid sixteenth century, as an adjective only since the mid eighteenth. It properly continues in either usage.

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  71. kaywess -  July 10, 2013 - 10:48 am

    The word “myriad” is found in as listed in dictionaries as both a noun and an adjective. When used as a noun, as it is in the above article, it is perfectly proper to say ” a myriad of.” This usage is similar to saying, “I have a ton of homework.” A brief internet search will reveal a myriad of knowledgeable sources that legitimate this usage.y

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  72. Jimmy -  July 10, 2013 - 10:01 am

    Kayne West likes fish sticks. He is a gay fish.

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  73. Estelle -  July 10, 2013 - 7:17 am

    I appreciate the usage of “current events” to help illustrate the difference between similes and metaphors, but… Kanye West?? Is there no one a bit less full of himself that you can possibly use?

    This simply continues the mindless celebrity worship our young children are growing up with. Why not use someone in education, science, hey maybe even literature…

    Unless, of course, no one else has the gall to call himself an actual god.

    Reply
  74. Kateri -  July 10, 2013 - 6:25 am

    Joni Mitchell, Hejira, “snow gathers like bolts of lace, waltzing on a bridal girl”

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  75. John Stufflet -  July 10, 2013 - 5:57 am

    Kanye West is a legend in his own mind. His behavior is that of a 10 year old narcissist, I can not get past this and enjoy his music. He is no Steve Jobs nor am I going to worship him because he thinks he is God. So when I use the word it goes like this “Yeezus is he mouthing off again why don’t we just ignore him?.”

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  76. Gregg Rossetti -  July 10, 2013 - 4:51 am

    I couldn’t read this article after I saw the grammatically erroneous statement: “He does it in a myriad of ways.” It should be “He does it in myriad ways.” If there are grammar errors on dictionary.com, who can I trust?

    Reply
  77. J. Key -  July 10, 2013 - 4:39 am

    Enjoyed reading the article, but was a tad taken aback with the improper use of myriad. Would you say “a numerous of ways?” Or what about “a countless of ways.” Nope. Check the, uh, well, dictionary. Oh, and with respect to the tenor of the article, let’s see…..which is the metaphor, and which the simile? – “Kanye West is a buffoon and a moron,” or “Kanye West is like a buffoon and a moron?”

    Reply
  78. Bryer -  July 10, 2013 - 1:41 am

    Heaven is my baby, s
    Suicide’s her father,
    Opulence is the end.

    Reply
  79. Really -  July 10, 2013 - 12:23 am

    It’s not simile cause he’s not like a god because Kayne West have earthly beauty and god have heavenly beauty and this is a beauty no human being can imagine or visualize till u get there, if u going. Second. Metaphor sounds more like his preference. because he call his god and not comparing himself to god. But in reality, Neither fit Mr. West.

    Reply
  80. Ernest Dudash -  July 9, 2013 - 5:59 pm

    “I float like a butterfly and sting like a bee.”
    My image is like an onomatopoetic boxer,
    a true metaphor for Ali.
    Kanye is the King’s court jester of speech
    In the boxing ring of words,
    punching wild in lyric,
    sucking substance to inflate himself like a leech;
    ED trying to fill a rolled condom to the tip.
    Ali was a hero of mine – I throw a knockout punch
    for the Louieville Lip.

    Reply
  81. RasEnoch -  July 9, 2013 - 5:39 pm

    Why is it that when we speak about ourselves as being that which the world considers otherwise, in order for what we deem ourselves to be fully accepted, has to be put into a category that is rational? If I say I am God, it’s neither a metaphor nor a simile, it’s verbatim. Because, I am talking about the God within me, which make me one with God. Hence, I am God!

    Reply
  82. Michael McDonnell -  July 9, 2013 - 5:38 pm

    I left Meriam Webster because their politics bled through far too often. I sincerely hope that isn’t happening here. For anyone who has had the opportunity to observe Kayne, it shouldn’t be very difficult to see that he is quite filled with himself. As a matter of fact, one might say: He’s like an as*h*le…
    Michael McDonnell
    Author: That Thing She Did.

    Reply
  83. Cherry -  July 9, 2013 - 5:09 pm

    Because I’ll always be blamed for the sun going down with a sigh
    But I’m the light in the middle of every man’s fog

    Tallest Man on Earth > Kanye West

    Reply
  84. Hummingbird -  July 9, 2013 - 3:51 pm

    Well, here you are trying to teach us proper usage of the English language and you write: “He does it in a myriad of ways.”

    I’m sorry but there is no such thing as “a myriad of ways.” That’s like saying: “He does it in a numberless of ways.”

    The sentence should have been written: “He does it in myriad ways.”

    Reply
  85. Larry -  July 9, 2013 - 2:45 pm

    Kanye is garbage. Oops. Is that a metaphor or a reality?

    Reply

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