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Why this word is causing so much controversy

Today the word “uppity” rose to number seven on Google’s list of extremely popular searches. The reason? Conservative talk radio host Rush Limbaugh referred to First Lady Michelle Obama as “uppity-ish.” Specifically, Limbaugh was discussing a Nascar rally on Sunday the 20th where Michelle Obama was booed by the crowd. Limbaugh said he believed the crowd was upset because “They understand it’s a little bit of uppity-ism.”

Not only are record numbers of people searching for the word, but the media has been discussing Limbaugh’s particular word choice. Both the Los Angeles Times and the New York Times, for example, have run stories on the incident.

Why does this particular word cause such a response? Unlike its synonym arrogant, the word uppity has a uniquely loaded racial history. It was first used in 1880 in a song called “Uncle Remus” to refer to black Americans who were being too self-assertive or stepping out of their so-called place. Back in 2008, when a Georgia senator referred to Obama as “uppity” it also caused quite a ruckus. It was discussed in USA Today, on NPR and of course across the blogosphere.

Our goal is always definition, explanation and education. We hope you find this additional history of the controversial word helpful. Because of the highly charged emotions and issues surrounding this topic, we will not be allowing comments on this Hot Word post.

Tired of exercise? Want speedier results from exercise–without spending more time at the gym? Jillian Michaels, author of Winning by Losing, reveals how to amp up your workout, accelerate fat and calorie burn, and make exercise more exciting–all in just 30 minutes!

Redbook August 1, 2006 | Berry, Mindy; Rones, Nancy Give yourself a pat on the back: You’ve made the commitment to getting fit, dutifully dedicated a few hours a week to breaking a sweat, and–best of all–watched as the pounds began to steadily melt away. But after months of doing the same fitness DVD or staring at the unchanging view from your treadmill, it’s no wonder if you feel like you’re sleepwalking through your workout.

Unfortunately, exercise boredom is one of the top reasons people throw in the towel. It can also lead to a weight-loss plateau: Our muscles get just as bored with the same old fitness routine as our minds, so when the newness fades, they stop responding, bringing weight loss to a grinding halt. The good news: Jump-starting fat burn is as easy as taking exercise up a notch or making a few tweaks to your current regimen. This month, Real-Life, Healthy Life fitness guru Jillian Michaels pays a visit to Jennifer Strange’s home in Traverse City, MI, to help recharge her get-fit goals–and give her (and you!) a new routine designed specifically to nix boredom, deliver fast results, and fit even the busiest lifestyle. site traverse city mi

Jennifer’s 3 exercise hurdles–and how anyone can jump over them Boredom is only one of many reasons for falling off a fitness plan, so before Michaels shared her new workout routine, she helped Jennifer tackle her biggest fitness roadblocks, Hurdle #1: NO TIME “Mondays and Tuesdays I have class after work, so I leave the house before 8 a.m. and don’t come back until 10 p.m. In fact, I’m only able to pick up my son, Keegan, from child care before 6 p.m. twice a week. I also have to teach a class on Saturday mornings, so Sunday is my only free day, and I try to devote it to Keegan.” * Michaels’s fix: “Jennifer does have a lot going on, but that’s why I know she can find room in her day for fitness. She’s so good at juggling her commitments that once she makes exercise a must-do, she’ll get it done. Some ideas:

“On one of the weeknights when she comes home on the early side, she should do a workout DVD while Keegan plays nearby. And if she wakes up just 15 minutes earlier twice a week, she could complete one 30-minute circuit workout by doing half one morning and half the next. Jennifer could also ask whoever’s watching Keegan on Saturday mornings to stay 45 minutes longer so she could hit the gym. If you really look at your schedule, I bet you’ll find pockets of time where exercise will fit in.” Hurdle #2: NO MONEY “I can’t afford to pay sitters–it’s too hard to justify in my budget. My mom sometimes watches Keegan on the weekends, and his other grandma helps out during the week. But I already rely on them so much, I feel bad asking for more.” * Michaels’s solution: “Fortunately, there are plenty of ways to sneak fitness into your day on the cheap. At work Jennifer should a 20-minute walk on her lunch break–that costs nothing! Jennifer also has a jogging stroller, which she should use with Keegan.

One fun, free routine: After getting your child settled in, try fast walking for five minutes, then recovering for two minutes, alternating between the two for 30 minutes. And be sure to make your last stop the playground–that’s good exercise for both of you!” * Hurdle #3: NO CONFIDENCE “I have this doubting voice inside of me that asks whether I’m doing what’s best for Keegan, especially with working a full-time job, going to school part-time, and putting in 10 hours a week as a graduate assistant to help cover tuition. After doing all that, I hate to leave him again to exercise.” * Michaels’s fix: “When Jennifer starts feeling guilty about making time to work out, she needs to think about how proud Keegan is going to be in the years to come when she’s fit and energetic enough to play soccer, baseball, and basketball with him. I tell moms all the time that it’s okay to be selfish in this scenario. You’ll not only set a good fitness example, you’ll also be healthier both physically and mentally–exercise beats stress! which means you’ll be more available for your kids.” Jennifer Strange, 28 Housing specialist for parolees and part-time graduate student; single mom of a 2-year-old son, Traverse City, MI “Trying on the clothes that used to fit me four years ago inspires me to work out, At the time, I just gotten out of the police academy and I was in great shape. Now, when I see my spare tire in the mirror, it motivates me to find time to go to the gym.”

STARTING CURRENT STATS STATS

HEIGHT, WEIGHT: 5’10″, 211 lbs 196 lbs BODY FAT: 33% 30.7% WAIST: 43 1/4″ 37 3/4″ HIPS: 47 1/4″ 45 3/4″ BUST: 41″ 40 3/4″ THE SMALL CHANGE THAT’S ALREADY PAID OFF FOR HER: “Because I plan on losing more weight, I’ve held off on buying new clothes. But last week, I saw myself in the mirror and realized how frumpy I looked in my baggy pants. I decided to reward myself with an inexpensive trendy outfit. It fits right and shows my progress. When I wear it, I don’t want to eat anything fattening.” THE HURDLE SHE STILL FACES: successfully managing social events. “I had my sister’s graduation party and my uncle’s wedding celebration in the same weekend. Bratwurst and burgers were the main entrees at both. and the only salad was antipasto salad. It was so hard to eat healthy.” HOW TO JUMP OVER IT: In general, don’t look at social functions as a license to overeat–but it is okay to go offtrack a bit, says RLHL nutrition expert Lisa R. Young, Ph.D., author of The Portion Teller. “When Jennifer has a busy weekend ahead, she should pick the one event where she really prefers to splurge, and then give in to fewer temptations at the other affairs, says Young. A reasonable portion of antipasto or a burger once in a while won’t kill anyone. The key is not to beat yourself up about the splurges and to get right back on track later that day.” Also, before she goes to any event Jennifer should eat something light at home–veggies or a yogurt–so she doesn’t arrive starving and head straight for the buffet.

The more-results, less-time routine Ready to get moving? Simply replace your old workout with Michaels’s circuit-training routine, an approach that involves alternating between strength-training moves and short blasts of cardio. Circuit-training delivers the same results as going for a run and lifting weights but in less time. The reason: Your heart is pumping while you do those biceps curls, which means your muscles have to work harder–and you burn more fat per minute. Completing all five circuits, one after another, takes only 30 minutes. Do this heart-pumping, muscle-sculpting routine three times per week to get the results you desire–fast. What you’ll need: a set of light hand weights (no heavier than five pounds). Optional: a body ball and stepper.

CIRCUIT 1 squats Tones: glutes, quads, hamstrings a. Stand with feet hip-width apart, abs tight, arms straight out in front of you. weight on heels.

b. Inhale and sit back, keeping back straight and knees over ankles (don’t extend knees past toes). Lower until thighs are parallel to floor. Exhale and return to start. Do 15 to 20 reps.

modified push-ups (not pictured) Tones: chest, shoulders, triceps, abs a. With knees on the floor, lean forward and place palms on the floor slightly wider than shoulderwidth apart, keeping arms straight so that body forms a straight line from knees to head.

b. As you inhale, bend elbows and lower upper body until upper arms are parallel with floor, keeping a straight spine. Exhale and push back to start position. Do 10to 15 reps.

60-SECOND CARDIO BLAST: High knees Briskly jog in place, bringing your knees up in front of you as high as you can (aim for waist-high).

60-SECOND CARDIO BLAST: High knees Briskly jog in place, bringing your knees up in front of you as high as you can (aim for waist-high).

CIRCUIT 2 wide-grip dumbbell row Tones: lats, biceps, traps a. Stand with feet hip-width apart, hands at your sides with dumbbells in either hand, palms facing back. Bend at the waist until torso is at a 45-degree angle, knees slightly bent.

b. Exhale and slowly pull the dumbbells up while drawing the elbows back in a rowing motion until they’re in line with your torso. Inhale and slowly lower dumbbells to start. Do 10 reps.

dead lifts Tones: glutes, hamstrings, lower back a. Stand with feet slightly less than shoulder-width apart, knees slightly bent, arms at sides with a dumbbell in each hand, palms facing thighs.

b. Inhaling, slowly bend torso forward from the hips, keeping back flat and reaching arms toward the floor. Lower until your torso is almost parallel to floor. Focusing on hamstrings, exhale and slowly lift up to starting position. Do 10 reps.

30-SECOND CARDIO BLAST: Butt kicks Stand with feet hip-width apart, arms in jogging position at your sides. Briskly jog in place, bringing your heels up to your butt.

CIRCUIT 3 leg extensions with shoulder press Tones: quads and deltoids a. Sit on a body ball (or a sturdy chair), feet on the floor hip-width apart. With a dumbbell in each hand, raise arms straight out to the sides and bend elbows to form an L-shape with forearms perpendicular to the floor, palms facing forward. in our site traverse city mi

b. Extend right leg in front of you and lift until parallel to the floor. At the same time, press dumbbells straight up over your head. Slowly lower right leg and arms to start. Repeat with left leg. Do 15 to 20 reps with each leg.

* bench dips (not pictured) Tones: shoulders, triceps, chest a. Sit on the edge of a chair, palms on the front edge of the seat. Walk your feet forward about two feet and slide your butt off the chair; toes should be off the ground.

* Keeping elbows close to body, bend arms, slowly lowering your body until upper arms are parallel with floor. Hold, then straighten arms back to start. Do 10 to 15 reps.

60-SECOND CARDIO BLAST: Jumping jacks CIRCUIT (4) single-arm dumbbell row Tones: upper and middle back, biceps, rear delts a. Stand with feet hip-width apart, hands at your sides with a dumbbell in your left hand. Bend at the waist until torso is at a 45-degree angle and place your right hand on an exercise ball or chair seat for support, keeping knees slightly bent.

b. With your left arm close to your body, exhale and pull the dumbbell up until elbow is level with chest. Inhale and slowly return to start position.

Do 10 reps, then switch arms and repeat.

alternating lunges with biceps curls Tones: glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves, biceps a. Stand straight, feet hip-width apart, arms at your sides with dumbbells in either hand. Take a big step forward with your left foot, so right heel comes off the ground.

b. Inhale, bend knees, and slowly lower your body until left thigh is parallel to the floor, keeping the knee over the ankle. At the same time, curl dumbbells toward upper arms. Exhale and press up while lowering dumbbells, then step back to start.

Do 15 to 20 reps with each leg.

30-SECOND CARDIO BLAST Stand facing a bench or stepper with feet hip-width apart. Place left foot firmly on the bench or step, and step up, bringing right foot onto the bench. With both feet firmly planted, step back down with the left foot, leaving right foot on the bench, Now step up onto your right foot; continue alternating at a brisk pace.

CIRCUIT (5) chest fly Tones: chest, shoulders a. Lie back on a body ball or the floor with knees bent, feet flat on the ground. Holding dumbbells in both hands, extend arms straight up over your chest, palms facing each other.

b. Inhale and slowly lower the weights out to the sides until level with your chest, keeping elbows slightly bent. Exhale and slowly return to start.

Do 10 reps.

sumo squat with forward arm extension (not pictured) Tones: Inner and outer thighs, shoulders, anterior delts a. Stand straight, feet slightly wider than hip-width apart, toes turned slightly out. Hold one dumbbell with both hands at rest in front of you.

b. Inhale and with abs tight, bend knees and lower your body until thighs are parallel to the floor, making sure your knees don’t extend past your toes and back doesn’t arch. At the same time, slowly raise arms in front of you until parallel to the floor. Pause then exhale and press legs up to start while lowering arms.

Do 10 to 15 reps.

mountain climbers Start in a push-up position, with hands directly under shoulders and legs straight behind you, feet together, Bring right foot forward under your torso, then jump and switch legs, bringing the left foot forward and returning the right to start. Continue alternating at a brisk pace.

Berry, Mindy; Rones, Nancy

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