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What Do the Two Lines on the Dollar Sign Mean?

dollar

Check out the number four key on your keyboard. Stamped above it is one of the most powerful symbols in the world: the almighty dollar sign. But the symbol doesn’t just mark the US currency. Originally—and to this day—the emblem also represents the peso. Several Spanish-speaking countries consider it their own. Peso literally means “weight” in Spanish. The origin of the dollar (or peso) sign is uncertain. However, the reigning theory is that it comes from the engraving on Spanish colonial silver coins, called real de a ocho, or “piece of eight.”

On the coin, flanking the Spanish coat of arms, there were two columns which represented the Pillars of Hercules with S-shaped ribbons around them. Also represented on the coin was the motto plus ultra, which is Latin for “further beyond.” This was added after Christopher Columbus’s voyage to the Americas. The symbol first cropped up in business correspondence between British North America and Mexico in the 1770s. English-speaking people in the Spanish and English colonies of America knew the peso as a dollar, and in 1792, the dollar was designated as the official monetary unit of the US. Around that time, the dollar sign gained widespread use.

Here’s a piece of trivia to impress coin enthusiasts: the dollar symbol did not appear on US currency until the $1 coin that was issued in 2007.

While we’re on the subject of money, read about the story behind the word million.

See Also:
Dough, Clams and Cheddar: Diction of the Dollar
What Do the Latin Phrases and Symbols on the Dollar Bill Mean?
C’mon, Get Happy: 7 Happy Expressions Defined

EAST CENTRAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE BUSINESS, EDUCATION AND HEALTHCARE EXPO SET MARCH 8

US Fed News Service, Including US State News February 28, 2012 DECATUR, Miss., Feb. 27 — East Central Community College issued the following news release:

Career and educational opportunities will be available for East Central Community College students when the College hosts its tenth annual Business, Education and Healthcare Expo scheduled Thursday, March 8, 2012, on the Decatur campus. site east central community college

The public is also invited to attend the free event, which is scheduled from 9:30 to 11 a.m. in the Brackeen-Wood Physical Education Building.

“We are very pleased with the response we have received from the various vendors and are looking forward to another successful Expo,” said Wayne Eason, Director of Workforce Education and Expo committee chairman.

Approximately 40 vendors are participating in this year’s event and include the following: Avon, Meridian; Baptist Health Systems, Jackson; Baptist Medical Center (Leake), Carthage; Central Mississippi Residential Center, Newton; Color Me Beautiful, Toomsumba; East Central Mississippi Healthcare, Sebastopol; ESCO Corporation, Newton; Friends of Children of MS, Inc., Newton; GEO Group, Meridian; Golden Living Center, Carthage; H&H Chief Sales, Carthage; Hol-Mac Corp., Bay Springs; Jackson State University, Jackson; Laird Hospital, Union; Liberty National Life Insurance, Meridian; Manpower, Meridian; Mississippi Army National Guard, Newton; Mississippi Care Center of Morton, Morton; Mississippi College, Clinton; Mississippi Organ and Recovery Agency, Flowood; Mississippi State University, Meridian; Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks, Canton; Mississippi Rural Health and Primary Care, Jackson; Mississippi Teacher Center, Jackson; Pioneer Community Hospital of Newton, Newton; River Valley Animal Foods, Forest; Rush Health Systems, Meridian; Scott Regional Hospital, Morton; St. Dominic Hospital, Jackson; United Blood Services, Meridian; University of Mississippi, University; University of Mississippi Health Care, Jackson; University of West Alabama, Livingston; University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg; Raytheon, Inc., Forest; Anderson Hospital, Meridian; and Mississippi Department of Rehabilitation, Meridian. here east central community college

154 Comments

  1. Marina -  April 17, 2014 - 3:09 pm

    Weird, I was always told as a kid that the two lines that went through the S were originally a U, and that the symbol was just a U draw up top of an S and that over time people just started writing two lines instead and eventually, just one line.

    Out of curiousity, has anyone else here ever heard that?

    Reply
    • Wayne -  May 21, 2014 - 4:26 am

      Just found it in the book of Atlas Shrugged

      Reply
      • N -  May 30, 2014 - 9:12 pm

        The word “dollar” and the dollar sign “$” come from the German “thaler” coins on which was printed “NU 21″ referring to Numbers 21 (look it up) and a picture of the snake on a pole from said Bible chapter. The $ is a picture of the snake on a pole from Numbers 21. No idea when the second line came into the picture, maybe to differentiate it from the letter “S”.

        Reply
    • I -  May 29, 2014 - 9:01 pm

      I was told the same

      Reply
    • Haley -  July 19, 2014 - 10:34 pm

      I’v never heard of either explanation! I love this site.

      Reply
    • Diane -  October 16, 2014 - 12:54 pm

      When I was a child all dollar symbols had 2 vertical lines through the S and we were told in school that the 2 vertical lines were for the U in US. Even on typewriters…we seemed to have lost one of the verticle lines when comuters came along.

      Reply
  2. Synn -  April 16, 2014 - 2:15 pm

    “Here’s a piece of trivia to impress coin enthusiasts: The dollar symbol did not appear on U.S. currency until the $1 coin that was issued in 2007.”

    WRONG!

    The 1918 edition $10,000 bill (which was, and still is, US legal tender) had the $$ on it!

    Reply
  3. zim dollar -  April 16, 2014 - 5:47 am

    All yall listen now, you do not have maney ( $; yen; pounds; or whatever ) because instead of making it, yall be talking trash!!!!

    if you got it like me_ cool and if you don’t stop wasting time and get up off your bottoms and start makig it..nxa!!!

    Reply
  4. mocca -  April 15, 2014 - 6:16 pm

    AWKWARD!

    P.S. $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
    $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
    $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
    $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$!

    Reply
  5. indigo jahones III -  April 15, 2014 - 6:11 am

    yo yo yo, im making it rain alll up in here!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

    Reply
    • thats for babies -  April 15, 2014 - 1:05 pm

      NO i don’t want to make duckies thats for babies!

      Reply
  6. ANYONE easl? -  April 15, 2014 - 5:14 am

    any one saw that the one on the 4 key has inly one line? not two?

    $ $ $

    see?

    Reply
    • randomGuy -  April 15, 2014 - 1:39 pm

      No duh, thats what theyre pointing out stupid.

      Reply
    • Haley -  July 19, 2014 - 10:36 pm

      Oh my gosh it does!

      Reply
  7. AWESOME GIRL -  April 14, 2014 - 3:55 pm

    the s stands for a snake that hercules defeated, and the two lines symbolize hercules’s arms or his club and his arm. YOU’RE ALL WRONG, PEOPLE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! but it’s true that other countries use this sign for THEIR currency.

    Reply
  8. Your Mom -  April 14, 2014 - 12:05 pm

    MONEY MONEY AND More MONEY!!!! $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

    Reply
    • Your Mom's Mom -  April 14, 2014 - 8:12 pm

      MONEY!!!
      $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
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      Reply
      • Your Mom's Mom -  April 14, 2014 - 8:13 pm

        Derp chain

        Reply
    • indigo jahones III -  April 15, 2014 - 6:13 am

      if you like money, i can make it rain on you: mom

      Reply
  9. Vanessa -  April 13, 2014 - 2:37 pm

    S – mean SATAN – the root of all EVIL. makes more sense.

    Reply
    • Satan -  April 14, 2014 - 11:45 am

      Hahaha you crazy lady!

      Reply
      • AWESOME GIRL -  April 14, 2014 - 3:56 pm

        ur crazy S*tan

        Reply
      • SATAN -  April 14, 2014 - 5:04 pm

        Name stealer!

        Reply
    • Jonathan -  April 14, 2014 - 4:09 pm

      Hahaha you unfunny dingbat

      Reply
    • mooisevil -  April 15, 2014 - 7:56 am

      yup yup!

      Reply
    • Jesus -  April 15, 2014 - 8:01 am

      You got it, lady. II means bars for jail. Ha Ha Ha. I won from Satan.

      Reply
    • Barbara -  April 17, 2014 - 8:46 am

      The biblical quote is that the LOVE of money is the root of all evil. Money is a tool that can be used for good or evil.

      Reply
      • Haley -  July 19, 2014 - 10:38 pm

        Exactly….just like idiots who say guns kill people. No they don’t, people kill people! It’s not the money’s fault you’re evil, it’s not the gun’s fault you’re evil.

        Reply
    • Ms Moommist -  April 17, 2014 - 8:46 am

      It isn’t that money is the root of all evil. You have free choice and satan isn’t the root One’s choice to do evil is the root… It is the “love” of money which is the root of all evil. It is call responsibility. Choose wisely my Friends! Choose what is right, what is just, and what brings joy, not only to you but to others.
      That is what will reject and destroy evil.

      Reply
  10. minion -  April 13, 2014 - 2:25 am

    $$$

    Reply
  11. J.D. -  April 12, 2014 - 8:48 pm

    “Here’s a piece of trivia to impress coin enthusiasts: The dollar symbol did not appear on U.S. currency until the $1 coin that was issued in 2007.”

    Oh? Suggest you check your own site in a bit more detail. currency is paper money. Coins are not currency. By the way, a coin enthusiast is called a numismatist.

    And for the person that said # is not a pound sign. Haha, are you serious? You are confusing #, the U.S. symbol for pound weight with £, the symbol of the U.K. monetary unit.

    Reply
    • K -  April 14, 2014 - 12:12 pm

      Currency: a system of money in general use in a particular country, a : something (as coins, treasury notes, and banknotes) that is in circulation as a medium of exchange
      b : paper money in circulation. So, currency could be either coins or paper money.

      Reply
      • Bud D. -  April 15, 2014 - 4:46 am

        In the future you should consider “quotes”, AND a reference to the source you cite, otherwise your comment appears to be just that – your comment…

        Reply
    • rashid -  April 14, 2014 - 8:18 pm

      really people here are crazy

      Reply
    • Em -  April 16, 2014 - 7:54 am

      A coin enthusiast is also called a coin enthusiast–when people say “I’m afraid of spiders” do you scream in their faces, “THAT’S CALLED ARACHNOPHOBIA”? Also, as K mentioned, if it’s in circulation, it’s considered currency to the layman. You should calm your facts down a bit; I highly doubt dictionary.com wrote this blog entry just to cause you distress.

      Reply
  12. Kat -  April 12, 2014 - 8:27 pm

    I’ve always thought that originally, the sign was a U over an S, for US. Later on, they changed the sign to two lines over an S. After that, instead of two lines, there was only one line over the S. But I guess that may have just been some rumor…………………………………………………………………….

    Reply
  13. alittlerealitycheck -  April 12, 2014 - 3:11 pm

    The dollar sign for the United State is the U transposed on top of the S. The true dollar sign has two vertical lines running through it… the ‘U’ – not just one line, $) (as is so often seen. It is US currency

    Reply
    • Barbara -  April 17, 2014 - 8:48 am

      That’s the one I learned, except the double line from the U was shortened to one line because people were lazy.

      Reply
    • Haley -  July 19, 2014 - 10:40 pm

      Then why would Mexico be using it as a peso sign.

      Reply
  14. Claudio Pereira -  April 12, 2014 - 3:43 am

    In Brazil, the “$” symbol is called “Cifrão” :)

    Reply
  15. Chloë -  April 11, 2014 - 9:55 am

    But… The two lines come from U and then the S means ‘states’. It really means United States.

    Reply
  16. Noah -  April 11, 2014 - 8:02 am

    $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$~MONEY~$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$~MONEY~$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$~MONEY~$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$~MONEY~$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

    Reply
    • yolo -  April 13, 2014 - 12:30 pm

      HAHAHAHAHAAHAHAHAHAHAHHAAHaA$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$4$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

      Reply
    • nico -  April 14, 2014 - 5:31 am

      $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

      Reply
  17. Scia -  April 10, 2014 - 4:01 pm

    I’d heard that the $ sign was originally derived from an “S” with a “U” over-through it. Specifically, that it was based off of the letters “US,” as in “United States.” Has anyone else seen/heard anything about that?

    Reply
    • Jack -  April 11, 2014 - 12:49 pm

      I heard that too. what if the Spanish copied the US.

      Reply
    • bunny -  April 11, 2014 - 1:29 pm

      no but I heard about the “S” stands for the united states and there was an “L” was over it and the US just cut of the end of the “L”. :)

      Reply
    • Dhamani -  April 11, 2014 - 2:16 pm

      yes i have

      Reply
    • Dhamani -  April 11, 2014 - 2:17 pm

      yes i have its just dictionary.com uses the cheapest info

      Reply
    • alittlerealitycheck -  April 12, 2014 - 3:12 pm

      Yes, you’re correct. It is not supposed to be an S with one vertical line ($) but the U on top of the S.

      Reply
    • Kat -  April 12, 2014 - 8:28 pm

      Yes! I just posted a comment on that…
      ; )

      Reply
    • poop -  April 14, 2014 - 3:37 am

      dumbo

      Reply
    • dodo bird -  April 14, 2014 - 3:40 am

      $ is cowierd

      Reply
      • blah blah -  April 14, 2014 - 3:44 am

        dodo bird is cool!

        Reply
  18. iWonder -  April 10, 2014 - 12:09 pm

    Does the S shaped ribbon symbolise anything?

    Reply
    • katriel -  April 10, 2014 - 4:02 pm

      i think the s means spanish cause didn’t it say it came from the spanish

      Reply
      • Ma -  April 12, 2014 - 11:27 pm

        S cannot mean Spain because in Spanish, Spain is España!

        Reply
  19. Cam Myers -  April 10, 2014 - 10:38 am

    My understanding: the US dollar sign, which has TWO vertical lines, is a combination of a “U” and an “S” layered on top each other, standing for “United” and “States”.

    Reply
    • scimanager -  April 11, 2014 - 12:15 pm

      Our friend, from a prominent family of Seville, Spain, has told us the dollar sign derives from his city, and symbolizes the wealth of the Americas. The S stands for Seville, which was the economic center of the Spanish empire (and of the western world) after the discovery of the Americas, and the place where tons of gold from the Americas was brought. The two lines represent the Pillars of Hercules, Roman columns that did and still do characterize the city.

      Reply
    • alittlerealitycheck -  April 12, 2014 - 3:13 pm

      Yes.

      Reply
  20. Jim -  March 5, 2014 - 1:14 pm

    Also, in cartoons and such, sometimes a three-barred dollar sign is used to indicate large amounts of money.

    Reply
  21. Jelle Alkema -  October 8, 2013 - 7:24 am

    The word dollar actually comes from the Dutch Daalder, the coin used in New Amsterdam (new York), and indeed the word Daalder in Dutch is derived from the German Thaller after the valley introducing this word in our Global language.

    Reply
  22. americo simoes -  September 22, 2013 - 6:02 am

    One line across the dollar sign is fiat currency…two bars across the dollar sign is a gold reserve dollar…the dollar real true dollar…..dollar is substantive not a noun or adjective…in US law a dollar is defined as 1/20 of an oz on gold……therefore $1000 means just as little as1000kg ..ie 1000kg of what?…it is easier to count than to know what you’re counting!!!

    Reply
  23. AeroNSX -  September 13, 2013 - 1:54 pm

    Why does America use the dollar sign if it probably is Spanish?

    Reply
  24. AeroNSX -  September 13, 2013 - 1:51 pm

    Very Intresting!

    Reply
  25. Elizabeth -  July 15, 2013 - 12:31 pm

    I thought the same thing about the U over S. It’s only recently that I’ve noticed the single line through the “S” on the keyboard. I do still write two lines when I write a “$”, they do sometimes run together depending on how fast I’m writing etc. As I write this, don’t assume I’m ancient either. I’m actually only in my mid-thirties, yet learned and write it that way.

    Reply
  26. G Von Richter -  January 26, 2013 - 6:22 am

    The Dollar sign always had two bars through it when I was a kid. Some have mentioned that the Dollar Sign with two Bars indicates true US Currency made or backed by gold or silver, The single Bar Dollar sign indicates money issued by the Federal Reserve Bank which is covered by Fractional Reserves [Basically nothing] . The Federal Reserve Bank Is a private corporation that has a monopoly on issuing Federal Reserve Notes on behalf of the US Government. So two bars= Real US Currency–and one bar = Federal Reserve Notes.

    Reply
  27. doug -  January 1, 2013 - 1:25 pm

    I am a 49- year- old (US) American. I was taught in elementary school that the symbol originated from the superimposed U and S. As a child, it never occurred to me that a teacher could give out bogus information. I was also unaware that the symbol was used by other countries. Until recently, I believed that to be the uncontroverted truth.

    As I read through the comments above, the most convincing argument is the hand written # sign, in which the pen dragged between the horizontal lines. This is offered as my opinion, without any authoritative support.

    Reply
  28. Derrick Tran -  September 11, 2012 - 5:55 pm

    So if the dollar sign looks like $, then why does @, *, and & look like it is right now?

    Reply
  29. john -  August 20, 2012 - 5:19 am

    i had a doubt on this from longtime……! got cleared now…………….!
    But who knows its true or what….

    Reply
  30. Mischef -  August 19, 2012 - 10:49 pm

    I googled “origin of the $ symbol’ and came up with the following – from the Oxford Dictionary (I’m an Aussie by the way) – Please note – the # symbol is not a pound sign – its a hash symbol – or in the twitterverse – a hash tag. A pound symbol looks like a curly top L with a line through – see below…..

    http://oxforddictionaries.com/words/what-is-the-origin-of-the-dollar-sign

    Many suggestions have been made about the origin of the dollar symbol $, one of the commonest being that it derives from the figure 8, representing the Spanish ‘piece of eight’. However, it actually comes from a handwritten ‘ps’, an abbreviation for ‘peso’ in old Spanish-American books. The $ symbol first occurs in the 1770s, in manuscript documents of English-Americans who had business dealings with Spanish-Americans, and it starts to appear in print after 1800.

    The word ‘dollar’ itself derives from the Flemish or Low German word daler (in German taler or thaler), short for Joachimstaler, referring to a coin from the silver mines of Joachimstal, in Bohemia (now Jáchymov in the Czech Republic). The term was later applied to a coin used in the Spanish-American colonies and also in the British North American colonies at the time of the American War of Independence. It was adopted as the name of the US currency unit in the late 18th century.

    See other Questions about symbols.
    Take a look at: What is the origin of the pound (£) sign?
    Or: Does the ‘¢’ in the US cent sign stand for ‘cent’?

    Reply
  31. M02 -  August 19, 2012 - 5:13 pm

    Sifting through the comments one reaches a few conclusions;

    One -the article itself is accurate. Insofar as one can ever trust comments on the internet without self-research; the U-over-S theory seems to have been debunked. So congratulations to Dictionary.com for that one, I don’t think that point has been made enough.

    Two- The reason there is a lot of anti-US sentiment is because we understand each other. Which is unfortunate considering the purpose of language. As far as I know, Korean’s are raised to be as “Proud of the nation” as Americans are, but as I don’t share a language base with them I don’t have to hear about it. Furthermore if I can type “Honour”, “Colour”, “Tap” and “Boot” into the search and still get the Queen’s English definitions I don’t think anyone can claim Dictionary.com to be solely about the American language.

    Therefore a concession is in order; acknowledgement of the Queen’s English used on the site in the written articles, and an attempt among those leaving comments to use the parts of the language we do share to communicate, rather than complain. Perhaps if any of our posters from Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Singapore, Malaysia, Zimbabwe &etc could tell us how their countries came to use the “$” symbol it’d be more constructive than railing at only the American version’s history being relayed, the comments would have been pleasanter to read and we’d all have learnt something. And if the posters from America could not be so uppity when others request articles (admittedly, not always politely) that are not strictly US related there’d be far fewer arguments.

    Then again, (Conclusion the third: ) this is the internet. I/we/you could just leave…

    Reply
  32. Mike -  August 14, 2012 - 8:03 pm

    The 2 slashes indicated when U.S. currency was backed by Gold and Silver Coin…The one slash today indicates our currency no longer backed by it and owned by the Federal Reserve…

    Reply
  33. Olivia -  August 12, 2012 - 5:25 pm

    cool!! i know my teachers get mad when i use $ instead of the one w/ 2 lines…………….

    Reply
  34. Proudly South African -  July 22, 2012 - 5:06 pm

    #Lulu,

    Just my 2cents….

    If you’re genuine about “love meeting smart correct people”, I simply cannot imagine you feeling too much love these days.

    But, do not despair, its nothing that a little ‘grammar and punctuation’ can’t correct…

    PS: English is my first language too…
    The Queen’s English, that is.

    Reply
  35. R3BOOB -  July 18, 2012 - 1:16 am

    Hi

    Reply
  36. awel -  July 14, 2012 - 2:23 am

    I am awel from eritera 24. age o wante riche tow mache money

    Reply
  37. Amanda -  July 12, 2012 - 4:49 am

    This was sort of interesting needs more adjectives though

    Reply
  38. LeLe -  July 10, 2012 - 5:58 am

    @Saf. I love u!! First comment, cldnt have said it better myself, then second comment was even better! U r soooo rt, bc we are FROM America, same way it’s simply an instinct to respect, take pride of, and protect our mother or father ev if one were adopted and didn’t know their mother or father, they’d still protect, respect, & take pride in them bc deep inside/instinctively they know that’s their real roots. As an American, Australian, etc, you’d obv be reading the dictionary of that country’s origin or Your own specific language dialect w/in your country-your roots. Therefore, a short article wasn’t explaining the origin of the dollar, or need I say S w/2 lines or one to keep happy the other ppl reading an American site for shi*s n giggles I guess bc they obv don’t wanna learn NEthing bout American History or they’d be satisfied and glad to learn this LITTLE SHORT piece of info Just as the rest of the happy ppl on here posted; but no of S w/2 lines or one origin, it was simply to state fun info about HOW THE U.S. ACQUIRED ITS SYMBOL FOR MONEY/IT’S OWN CURRENCY. Therefore, while it DID mention another country, it did So bc THAT’S WHERE THEY GOT IT FROM, adopted it from the Spanish. Sorry New Zealand, Australia, etc were not there at that moment it were adopted, but since they weren’t then THEY HAVE NOTHING TO DO WITH THE HISTORY OF AMERICA’S CURRENCY SYMBOL and the lines theory of it. This IS NOT an encyclopedia, it’s a site to explain and define ENGLISH AND ONLY ENGLISH words and language, and for us whom use the ENGLISH language to translate things into other languages, just as I’m sure you in New Zealand has a book BY a New Zealand producer written in New Zealand language, that translates words into ENGLISH for you. If you’d rather not hear our history then don’t listen, for one, & for two I’d cherish and admire to hear about things you guys were taught of your country and heritage in High School or from books or websites even After high school, (whether it’s false in terms of mythical fables being told as a truth to the students for pride or whatev other reason) & think it’s cute what you were taught etc; I’d NEV make fun of it (again, ev if it were false & I knew the true meaning). So lighten up, lose the negativity bc enjoying & taking pride of something ev if you don’t have time to explain the entire history (and timeline I’m sure you’d want them to add, rt?) bc it’s a DAILY short scripture-not ev a full article bc it’s daily, meant to b short n sweet. Your negativity of raining on ppl’s sense of pride makes you far worse than the authors of short articles rushing & not having time to elaborate on EV SNGL PIECE they ev write. That’s normal n absolutely nothing bad about that, Ur knit-picking at articles, & specifically mad at many American articles at that that I heard you say, is def bad, ESP bc your talkin bout things that don’t ev make sense nor reply. If Ur reasons were correct you’d still b wrong for Knit-picking negativity, but your wrong in what you stated. ESP bc here in America we greatly enjoy and thrive on learning about other countries, & have millions of articles & books and magazines about CORRECT info (as u wished or complained about) on ALL other countries, and prob hundreds to thousands on the history of currency symbols and the S w/2 or 1lines. If you’d like you can fly here, or look up on web, to critique those American-English writings on the History of the S w/2 lines or 1 and see if the info is correct bc this article CLEARLY is not about that. :)))))))
    P.s. lmd_120@yahoo.com! Lol ;) just love meeting smart correct ppl

    Reply
  39. Derrick -  July 9, 2012 - 7:18 pm

    Very interesting. Had know idea that the sign had that much history among different countries and cultures.

    Reply
  40. Sam McFisher -  July 9, 2012 - 6:43 am

    Dollar should be D with a stripe on it or 2 stripes .. but it would be too obvious as D is also for Devil :) Right ??

    and the S … why is is S.. maybe coz my name is S ,..and S is for Sorry .. with two stipes would be sorry twice.. and if someone apologizes twice .. it means that apology does not mean anything.. or it means that this someone is a compulsive liar.. like most governments and central banks… but I agree with the theory og german root ‘Thaler’ which means Valley .. and they minted silver coins out of a valley .. most english words are from Germanic… then Latin … so i go with ZE GERMANZ

    Reply
  41. Hello, world. -  July 4, 2012 - 10:02 pm

    I want to know where everyone is getting this whole “S over U” thing..
    Who in the world gave you information so completely irrelovent to the the currency?
    I was slightly taken aback by the ingorance of some of the comments.
    I had previous knowledge on the subject, and had heard of how, as the theory goes, the symbol was soposedly used as a coat of arms and also of how the lines represented the so called “Pilars of Hercules”. But never had I heard of such “S over U” nonsense. The fact is, the $ symbol had already been claimed and used by several other countries before the US had even been officially declared.
    I’m only fourteen, and a proud American.
    I am amazed by how so many citezens have such little knowledge on our currency.

    Reply
  42. JP -  July 4, 2012 - 3:39 am

    @ Jim Kingsepp:

    Just to add a comment: the origin and meaning of “Thal’ in Neanderthal. word.
    Thal in German: Valley
    If you go beyond European languages ie Sanskrit: Thal and Sthal means: a Place in Sanskrit.
    Good to read all this.. Sad to read a lot of anti-US comments..

    Reply
  43. Mick Dundee -  July 1, 2012 - 4:17 pm

    There is no way in the world the $ symbol could have originated from a combination of the U and S in United States. The reason is that the “United States” only came into being after the civil war, which was when all the States became United, (funnily enough).
    The dollar symbol had been around before Chris Colombus “discovered” America.
    So logically, the $ symbol could not ever have originated from a merge of the U and the S in United States.
    Sheesh, and I’m not even American.

    Reply
  44. JYOTI CHAUHAN -  June 29, 2012 - 12:00 am

    REALLY ITS VERY INTERESTING TO KNOW THE ORIGIN OF DOLLAR $

    Reply
  45. Apathetic American -  June 28, 2012 - 2:51 am

    I find it quite sad that we, as supposed beings of higher evolution; can’t bring ourselves to civilised conversation without turning it into a prick waving contest. Who gives a rats ass which one of you might have the faintest idea of what your talking about. After reading all the comments; I was more astonished at how many of you had the good sense to “not” tell everyone what you “know” about the articles topic, and how your The Ultimate Source of all things anti-American. I don’t think you’d like what people would say about you if you were born an American, and raised to believe It’s a great thing to be, because you’re born free, able to achieve whatever your heart desires. Only to grow up to hear that the outside world hates everything American, and all those desires require a whole lot of money; which only one percent of the world actually has any of, but we’re all pitted against each other to get our so-called fair share. Well friends I tell you whether the $ymbol has one or two strikes doesn’t matter if you don’t control any of it, and let me clarify for you; YOU DONT! What you carry around with you are in fact loans to the government by the government; the only real money is in precious stones and metals I personally believe It’s because their tangible objects that can’t easily be destroyed (but what do I know “nothing” gladly admitted) plus the more rare they are the more valuable they become. Like collectible coins for example the fewer there are the more value rises, but unlike stones and metals their value is dependent on a functioning financial system. The fact that the $ymbol is used in so many countries, terrifies the Hell out of me; because it just makes it that much easier to unify a one world currency and I don’t think that needs explaining as to why that’s bad. Come on people are we so blinded by our own insufficient means to provide, do we all not have enough that we must lash out at anyone that seems to have more? Sadly we do just that don’t we, When we should be working together to make things right. I hope,… Nah,… I pray,… that we as humans, the race of superiority on this planet, and those that are said to be made in Gods image, can rise up to be what we were destined to be; a noble race, an honourable race, and thee race that conquered itself before it fell to the almighty Dollar. Sorry to any that may of been offended, and yes I am an American. If that is your only reason to be offended, then Go to Hell; do not pass go do not collect 200 peso’s, and yes I know the Exchange rate isn’t equivalent to American dollars or even monopoly money. But since your so petty with your reasons to hate then I’ll be petty with my possibly slanderous if not slightly racist insult. Again sorry if I offend any others.

    Reply
  46. matt -  June 27, 2012 - 5:00 am

    I always understood that the $ with two lines through represents the US$, whilst the $ with one generally represents others. There seems to be no mention of that in this explanation so am I incorrect, or is that an old fashioned distinction that has fallen by the wayside?

    Reply
  47. beauty and the beast lover -  June 26, 2012 - 9:40 pm

    Wow! i never knew that! plus, allof the comments before me are very interesting! i <3 dictionary.com!

    Reply
  48. Andie -  June 26, 2012 - 8:19 pm

    I’ll remember this when I get on Jeopardy.

    Reply
  49. k.g.parthasarathy -  June 26, 2012 - 3:04 am

    very interesting. It emphasises that history is not a boring subject. It is thought history means political history.

    Reply
  50. Francis -  April 24, 2011 - 1:34 pm

    Naira- N with a|in the middle

    Reply
  51. David -  April 16, 2011 - 6:21 am

    “Real de a ocho”…
    Don’t you mean “Real de ocho” ?

    Reply
  52. louis paiz -  April 15, 2011 - 12:53 pm

    sameone said that in the 70 and 80 the dollar sign had two lines that is not tru becouse if you are paying in pesos. one hundred pesos equals $5 dollars so if one pays 100 dollars with one line and receiving it with two then it does not make sense because the currency is diferent it is not 1×1 this is business wise so the line is a necessity.

    Reply
  53. adam carolla's disciple -  January 12, 2011 - 6:08 pm

    remember that character in the movie Friday – Dolla Bill? haha

    ah, good times.

    Reply
  54. LadyLove -  October 11, 2010 - 6:09 pm

    REAL MONEY:: Many of the older generations of the American people were taught to write the “S” with two lines through it. The two lines was a derivative of the “U” inside the “S” signifying “Units of Silver”. The United States of America silver dollar is the accepted and approved uniform monetary unit (coin standard). The United States of America did not issue paper money until 85 years after its independence from Britain, and when it did, it was backed by silver or gold. Even at that, early Californians refused to accept and use paper currency, especially the people in San Francisco.

    PHONEY MONEY: Today, all computer programs, stock certificates, financial paper, accounting records, balance sheets and summaries, bills, bonds, Promissory notes, bank paper such as checks, et cetera use the familiar symbol having only one line through it to denote the amount of debt considered.

    All Notes are “I Owe You’s” (IOU’s)
    including Federal Reserve Notes (FRN’s) All Notes represent debt. The corporate UNITED STATES is in bankruptcy and has no assets but can only monetize debt.

    Reply
  55. Grant -  September 30, 2010 - 8:13 pm

    The “U superimposed over the S” story is simply a rationalization that was used to assist in justifying the adoption of a foreign symbol to US citizens. It is perfectly ordinary to do this when developing a symbol. Stars and stripes are not “American” symbols, but when they were used for the US flag they were given a specific meaning for that purpose – the present-day states and the original 13 colonies. And once this was done, the “Stars and Stripes” became an American symbol.

    The fact that the symbol representing the US dollar is the “same” as other symbols (looks the same) is irrelevant in this sense. Once it was adopted for US currency it became an American symbol, and only for the purpose of representing US currency. The same symbol when used for, say, the Mexican peso would be a Mexican symbol.

    The original US currency symbol had two vertical lines. The symbol with a single vertical line, in reference to a dollar sign, is an evolution of the symbol by way of modern usage – merely a shorthand way of writing it. Whether other users of the symbol (eg Canada, Australia, New Zealand etc) adopted the two-line version or the single-line version is also irrelevant – the symbol represents their own currency and is therefore a “different” symbol in that respect.

    I’m from New Zealand and to the best of my knowledge we have always only used the single-line version for our currency. Possibly because our early politicians were terrified that NZ citizens might associate too closely with Americans and press for independence from England and admission to the Union – a notion that once was very real here, although not that popular.

    Reply
  56. isabel -  September 29, 2010 - 4:16 am

    What other currency uses the $ symbol? Escudo, the Portuguese currency before the use of €…

    Reply
  57. maxie -  September 28, 2010 - 12:26 pm

    C’mon folks,we must have better things to do.
    p.s.Canada above the U.S.,coincidence?I don’t think so.

    Reply
  58. Me -  September 25, 2010 - 11:46 pm

    I really don’t see why all the hate over an American website that is aimed at Americans. Check the Terms of Use to see where the company is located and the sources of the data it presents.

    Anyway, I’ve never heard of any distinction between the single line vs. double line symbol before. Not that there never was one. As long as I have used the symbol (longer than I care to admit), single or double line mean the same to me: currency for whatever country uses the symbol.

    Reply
  59. Elgie -  September 25, 2010 - 8:36 pm

    I’m a 58-year-old American with three university degrees. Until reading this, I had never heard of the ignorant notion that the dollar sign came from the superimposed letters “US.” That is a folk explanation at best. I can also tell you that I was taught in elementary school in the 1950′s and 1960′s to draw two marks, which I do to this day. One mark is just modern laziness.

    Reply
  60. Peck -  September 17, 2010 - 11:53 am

    I think the issue is not with what Dictionary.com has written, it’s about the responses which are very “one-eyed”. Dictionary.com has written a great piece that is quite unbiased and nicely written.

    And just because it is a small country or run by a despot, does not mean it is not valid… and the other point is that some of the contributors here seem to think that only the US uses the dollar.

    At least take time to read and understand the issues if you’re going to contribute.

    Reply
  61. Saf -  September 17, 2010 - 8:54 am

    Haha, I hardly think that the blog is spreading disinformation because they failed to mention Zimbabwe.

    You *cannot* cater to everyone. This is a WORD BLOG. If dictionary.com had a 60-person team working full-time on this blog, a four-year production time for each entry, and the specific goal of attempting to cater to everyone, half of the comments would STILL be from people who found fault with it.

    Honestly, you people crack me up.

    Reply
  62. who cares about Australia -  September 16, 2010 - 4:46 pm

    Hmm, I am an Australian and no one commenting here actually claims to be from US, but perhaps that’s because they assume everyone else is too, so it goes without saying.

    I could get into a whole essay about how people are being so centred on the US but I don’t want to waste this space. The Brainbone application on Facebook is one example.

    On the contrary, you’re being defensive if you say the rest of the world is being defensive, trying to justify why it happens. It’s ok to focus on the US sometimes; I mean, I can understand why the US election is more important than other countries for example. But when something is meant to be global, make sure it looks on the world as a whole and caters to everyone. Otherwise give a good reason why it should focus on US when it’s meant to be global. The deal here is the blog is providing us with facts, so it’s not right if it’s feeding us inaccurate information. There may be at least 10 countries using the $ symbol. Yes, there is Singapore, Hong Kong, etc…..

    Reply
  63. which direction? -  September 16, 2010 - 4:24 pm

    U.S. currency, Mexico–take a vacation in Mexico and drop U.S. money there.

    Reply
  64. Peck -  September 16, 2010 - 10:05 am

    I have to agree with Amanda! And don’t forget the Singapore $, Zimbabwe $, …etc.

    I think the general level of discussion here is rather poor. People cannot even spell “grammar”…

    And what is evident is the degree of outright misinformation (verging on Soviet-style propaganda) that is fed to Americans in very phase of their lives. The Spanish – and the Mexicans (remember – that’s who you took Texas from) – are a very significant part of your history. Give them some credit.

    Oh – and I would not take your keyboard to be the definitive source of whether there should be one or two verticals!

    Reply
  65. Dickie -  September 16, 2010 - 8:36 am

    Golly! You Canadians, Austrailians and, dare I say, Kiwis are awfully sensitive about an American web site of an American dictionary which uses American English as its basis. When we Americans visit a Canadian or Austrailian or New Zealandic dictionary web site we understand the native pride and don’t go off on the way you spell certain words like, “defence.” Oh, BTW, can you post the addresses of these web sites, eh?

    Reply
  66. Alex -  September 16, 2010 - 7:17 am

    The superimposed U S idea is simply a made-up answer.

    Reply
  67. Saf -  September 16, 2010 - 6:51 am

    @Bronwyn

    I also find that humorous… mainly because none of the people suggesting that theory have claimed to be from the U.S.

    Oops, I guess you just kind of assumed.

    Reply
  68. Ching -  September 15, 2010 - 9:08 pm

    Let the US Mint, which stamped out the first US-dollar coin with the symbol $, have their say??

    Reply
  69. Dr. StrangeLoaf -  September 15, 2010 - 4:04 pm

    Whoa, not sure how I managed to align those words all weird-like. Hmmm…………….

    Reply
  70. Amanda -  September 15, 2010 - 2:31 pm

    The article would be more accurate if any US words are removed. I am sick of seeing US-centric language and ideas everywhere as if they are the centre of the world. There are other countries using the dollar symbol! In fact they call it ‘dollar’, but it’s still a different currency. Apart from Canada, I am annoyed that Australia has been forgotten, as well as New Zealand – all using $$$$$$$

    Reply
  71. Dilia Bobadilla -  September 15, 2010 - 2:11 pm

    In ancient times lingot–in Spanish lingotes–of gold/silver were branded for the crown when transported by ships. I’ve also heard that there was a sort of mafia that branded certain pieces, that way they knew what to do with those. I guess pocket them. Remember the Peru ship that sank full of gold lingots?

    Reply
  72. Mr. Raymond Kenneth Petry -  September 15, 2010 - 2:06 pm

    P.S. I use $ and ¢ in mathematics to represent sin and cos, (sine and cosine), and similarly & (but drawn script-E-with-a-line-through-it), for the complex vector, & = ¢ +i$ .

    Reply
  73. Mr. Raymond Kenneth Petry -  September 15, 2010 - 2:00 pm

    BUT–

    How do you get “$” from “peso” unless it’s really ‘pe-So’, which derives probably from Sumerian Apsu, (No, I’m not droning on this Sumerian stuff but they had lots of modern words, like, sag, is a head because it sags, and is related to sack): Apsu and his sons Apsu’s Kinaku (whom Sumerians called Upsukkinaku, from which we get the word Shekinah), were golden… (which is really the Kinaku part, but Apsu was the important part)….

    We were taught in elementary school to be-not-lazy: to use both lines in drawing the “$” to distinguish the American dollar … so, just because it’s similar to the Spanish peso, does not mean it’s supposed to look, like, a peso–!

    And moreso the upper-case-’4′ has only tickmarks, not a vertical line through it … So, computers are the ultimate, digital, laziness…!

    Ray.

    Reply
  74. Bronwyn -  September 15, 2010 - 1:51 pm

    I find it VERY humourous that Americans posting here were the only ones taught in school that the dollar sign was based on the U.S.

    ‘Cause nothing came BEFORE the United States… that’s impossible!

    -Disgruntled Canadian

    Reply
  75. Warren -  September 15, 2010 - 1:04 pm

    The dollar sign when I was growing up in the 60′s and 70′s did have two lines through it. Maybe the one line is more universal and the computer people used that one on the keyboard.

    Reply
  76. EliBeth -  September 15, 2010 - 11:44 am

    I’m glad at least one person mentioned the fact that Canada also uses the dollar sign. It’s only the HUGE country right above the U.S… The two countries share the symbol since they share a similar history, having been one colony prior to the separation of the 13 colonies. There are either one or two lines depending on what country it is that uses the currency, since there are numerous that use the term dollar and the $ symbol.

    Reply
  77. harrypitts15 -  September 15, 2010 - 10:34 am

    One day I saw a note with the # sign written sloppily. When I first saw it I thought it was $. I had to examine it very closely to realize that it was really the pound sign. It was then that I decided that this is the origin of $. The information that $ comes from pesos is further evidence for this theory. With peso meaning weight it makes sense that # would be used as a sign for the currency. Although, I’ve done no research on the origin of #. I might have gotten this backwards.

    Reply
  78. Name? Doesn't matter -  September 15, 2010 - 10:32 am

    I didn’t even read this!!!!!!!!!!!!! I just commented!!!!!!! But i do have a riddle for ya’ll on here. If two trains were going 100mph at the same time and they were to crash on the next Monday, but they crashed on a friday.

    Reply
  79. abc123 -  September 15, 2010 - 9:29 am

    Wow, interesting :)

    Reply
  80. Storm -  September 15, 2010 - 9:16 am

    This Is Pretty Intresting Info. :* :)

    Reply
  81. Storm -  September 15, 2010 - 9:15 am

    I Agree it maybe very powerful but its not for good people in this world are very greedy when it comes to $!

    Reply
  82. Marcia -  September 15, 2010 - 8:51 am

    This theory that the letters U and S (for United States) superimposed resemble the historical double stroke dollar sign : the bottom of the ‘U’ disappears into the bottom curve of the ‘S’, leaving two vertical lines ignores the fact that the symbol was already in use as the symbol for the Mexican peso (referred to as “dollar” in English) before the formation of the United States. It also ignores the fact that the Mexican peso was adopted as the legal tender in British North America (i.e. the English colonies in North America, which later became part of the U.S. and Canada) in 1785, together with the term “dollar” and the $ sign.

    Reply
  83. Marcia -  September 15, 2010 - 8:46 am

    The word “cents” and the symbol of a line through a ‘c’, as well as the actual unit, also originated from the Mexican peso system – a centavo was 1/100 of a peso.

    Reply
  84. Cams -  September 15, 2010 - 8:44 am

    The theory that the dollar sign originates from the U superimposed over teh S (for United States) ignores the fact that the symbol was in use before the United States were formed. It is a fact that the symbol was first used to represent the Mexican peso, and that the Mexican peso was adopted in 1785 as legal tender of those English colonies in North America which later became the United States and Canada.

    Reply
  85. Steve Weston -  September 15, 2010 - 7:37 am

    I always thought that the word “peso” was spelled out in the “$.” You can pile up the letters one on top of the other and you will get something very close to the “$,” just as you can with the Toyota logo.

    Reply
  86. Name? Doesn't matter -  September 15, 2010 - 7:21 am

    :) me so happy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  87. Dr. デリックラウダーミルク -  September 15, 2010 - 6:49 am

    Interesting indeed.

    Reply
  88. Rob -  September 15, 2010 - 6:26 am

    The “U” over the “S” (again, for “United States”) is mentioned in Ayn Rand’s “Atlas Shurgged” as being the origin of the American dollar sign.

    Reply
  89. Courtenay -  September 15, 2010 - 5:44 am

    So there was such a coin as a “piece of eight” in real life, not just in pirate stories – and it had the original $ sign! Fascinating!! But what’s the origin of the dollar sign with only one vertical line through it, as it’s more normally written and printed nowadays? (Incidentally, we Australians have dollars too, and nowhere on our currency – coins or notes (bills) – is the dollar symbol used.)

    Reply
  90. Jim Kingsepp -  September 15, 2010 - 5:24 am

    I believe the word ‘dollar’ does derive from the German ‘Thaler’ as Mr. Petry says above. A ‘Thal’ in German is a valley (as in ‘Neanderthal’ — the bones of the Neanderthal were found in the valley of the Neander River) and a Thaler is a coin minted from the silver mined in the valley.

    Reply
  91. louis paiz -  September 15, 2010 - 5:23 am

    there is a diference between the dollar sign and the peso the dollar sign has only one line and the peso has two

    Reply
  92. Name? Doesn't matter -  September 15, 2010 - 5:17 am

    I just like using the money sign!!!$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ But you know it says in the Bible that the love of money is wrong!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I’m just sayin!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  93. Edèzy sylvanot -  September 15, 2010 - 4:49 am

    In malagasy people,the money is called by Ariary

    Reply
  94. Julia Gillaard -  September 15, 2010 - 4:28 am

    Heard once that US dollars has 2 pillars, and Australian dollars has 1. Is there any truth in that? (by the way, i’m australian, if you haven’t heard of me…)

    Reply
  95. crystal clear -  September 15, 2010 - 4:04 am

    I have to say, it is increasingly frustrating that a site devoted to the English language is almost exclusively talking about America.. ho hum.. oh yeah, America, capital of the world, that’s right.
    For the record, Australia, Canada and New Zealand all use dollars, and use the symbol accordingly. But who are we to mention?

    Reply
  96. suhas -  September 15, 2010 - 3:09 am

    The number four key on my keyboard has one thru the letter S. I did check with many key boards and it’s the same

    Reply
  97. suhas -  September 15, 2010 - 2:14 am

    Four key on my keyboard has just one line. I did verify with several other key boards and it’s the same???

    Reply
  98. abc -  September 15, 2010 - 1:23 am

    I suppose someone would like to hear what is between further beyond and nothing further beyond today.

    Reply
  99. Zemzerrett -  September 15, 2010 - 12:36 am

    To saleem,

    From what I remember, the idea of superimposed letters ‘U’ and ‘S’ was a theory as to determine the origin of the ‘$’ symbol.

    Reply
  100. MkMiku -  September 14, 2010 - 11:51 pm

    Great info. It’s always nice to learn about the currency we use on a daily basis.

    @Annie Yesterday was about the words um, eh, etc.

    Reply
  101. DOLLAR SIGN | BLOGCHI@mayopia.com -  September 14, 2010 - 11:12 pm

    [...] “$UCCE$$” has been linked to the Dollar $ign — in the Capitalistic scheme. — ART thou worthy of something fine — if you misunderstand the American dream — of freedom where money talks with a hammer — and “POVERTY SUCKS” in the slammer. — The political motivation is $elf interest with many a $ign or $ymbol — locked in a vicious circle of keeping contained within some thimble — the Oligarchs with the power — where self knowledge and compassion might be in play — Butt you’re given greater value with how much you earn — not what you do or say. — And maybe how you say it though we strive — for Contemporary Perfect Mediocritism. — Mayhap to be a fly upon the wall — within this “Doggerel” we call — $ymbolic quicker than the eye “Hand Jive”.. –>>Rupert L.T.Rhyme [...]

    Reply
  102. Annie -  September 14, 2010 - 8:11 pm

    Most people don’t even draw both “Pillars of Hercules”…but very interesting article. Anyone know what it was yesterday?

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  103. Faith -  September 14, 2010 - 7:40 pm

    Cool. I have ALWAYS wondered that…. :P

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  104. saleem -  September 14, 2010 - 7:18 pm

    Not sure as to the peso. But I’m pretty certain the U.S. Dollar symbol is
    based on the Typed U with an S placed on top. Seem to remember this image from my school days.

    Reply
  105. Tiger -  September 14, 2010 - 7:11 pm

    Wow! 2007! Although, it is not really surprising seeing that most of our currency spells things out and uses grammer. It is interesting where the dollar sign comes from. Good Job.

    Tiger

    Reply
  106. Mr. Raymond Kenneth Petry -  September 14, 2010 - 7:06 pm

    P.S. We should add that today the dollar-sign “$” also indicates Bytes (8-bits of data) probably because some computer-geek thought of “two-bits, four-bits, six-bits, a-(dollar/Byte).” (For $30 you can become a billionaire, at Wal*Mart).

    Ray.

    Reply
  107. Mr. Raymond Kenneth Petry -  September 14, 2010 - 7:00 pm

    That’s assuming that everyone already knows the story of the ‘U-over-S’ being the origin of our Dollar (Thaler Taler, which is German-Austrian-Swiss…but they use the Mark or Franc these days).

    If the II-over-S version really implied the Straits of Gibraltar, they probably were feeling the lore of Atlantis as told by the Greeks….*

    * The Pillars of Hercules as told by the Egyptians were more probably the rock mountain piles of “the blessed island” of Crete, where the capitol city is Hraklio Iraklio (cf Herakles Hercules Ur-Akiles Gilgamesh…but that’s another story…).

    Ray.

    Reply
  108. Debbie -  September 14, 2010 - 6:58 pm

    One of my professors said that the dollar sign is a U superimposed on an S with the bottom of the U taken off. He didn’t give any references.

    Reply
  109. joe -  September 14, 2010 - 6:44 pm

    A pound is also a measure of weight and, my memory is hazy but i think…, the line through was just used to distinguish the currency value from the weight of the precious metal, as the two diverged long before the gold standard was abandoned (in England mostly because the dual standard – gold and silver – tied the two currency values together regardless of market conditions in either precious metal. I imagine this happened in other countries too.)

    Reply
  110. Sarah -  September 14, 2010 - 6:42 pm

    I also heard the origin of the dollar sign was that the overlayed a “U” over an “S” (for United States) and eventually the bottom of the “U” was forgotten, and soon after that, the second “U” line, leaving us with “$”.

    Reply
  111. joe -  September 14, 2010 - 6:38 pm

    the line through the the letter appears on lots of currencies’ symbols – the British pound (a line through an “L”), the Korean won (a line through a “W”, the Japanese yen (a line through a “Y”)

    Reply
  112. €jJ1CF41L -  September 14, 2010 - 6:23 pm

    first to commment! Interesting info!

    Reply

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