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At sunset today, families and friends will gather to pray and then eat the traditional honey and apples, which symbolizes the hope for a sweet new year.

Today is Rosh Hashana, the day that marks the beginning of the Jewish New Year. Rosh Hashana comes from Hebrew and simply means “beginning of the year.”

Why isn’t the Jewish New Year on December 31st? The Hebrews used a lunar calendar long before the Gregorian calendar established the system used around the world. The Jewish calendar contains 12 months and consists of 353 to 355 days.

One tradition of the holiday is the blowing of the shofar, a ram’s horn that doubles as a wind instrument. In biblical times, its uses varied from communicating signals in battle to announcing the beginning of the Sabbath. Now, it is primarily used at synagogue services at this time of year.

The word “shofar” is from Hebrew, and it’s related to the Arabic word sawafiru, which means “ram’s horn.”

At sundown on September 17, Jews will observe Yom Kippur, which means “day of atonement.” During Yom Kippur, observers abstain from eating and drinking and participate in daylong prayers of repentance. Forgiveness is asked for sins committed during the year.

300-mile ride costs $10 on Midwest’s megabus

July 9, 2006 | Timothy W. Martin The airline industry has long had its upstart, low-cost, no- frills carriers. Now the bus industry has one serving eight Midwestern cities for as little as $1.50 a ride.

With visions of becoming the Southwest Airlines of the bus business, little megabus.com, a unit of Stagecoach Group’s Coach USA, is offering riders who are willing to wait on street corners trips between Chicago and Cincinnati, Cleveland, Detroit, Indianapolis, Milwaukee, Minneapolis/St. Paul and St. Louis.

Targeting motorists who are weary of $3-a-gallon gasoline and congested highways, megabus has attracted 73,000 riders since it launched operations in April. Carmela Spates recently booked a round- trip ticket on megabus from Chicago to Milwaukee. The cost: $2.50. “It’s real cheap, so even when you stop and eat, you’re still saving money,” says Spates, a 38-year-old accountant. go to website megabus promotion code

The company’s bright blue, 55-seat buses are painted with pictures of portly uniformed men proclaiming “From $1″ above an asterisk that mentions “plus 50-cent reservation fee.” But not everyone rides so cheaply. Passengers book seats online on a first-come, first-served basis, and prices vary depending on availability, destination and departure time. As many as seven $1 tickets are sold per trip, but most riders pay $10 to $15. Fares can go as high as $50 for latecomers.

But most fares are significantly lower than those offered by Greyhound Lines Inc., a unit of Laidlaw International Inc. A one-way ticket from Chicago to Cleveland, purchased about two weeks in advance, costs $45 on Greyhound, compared with $15 on megabus. The same route and time on Amtrak sells for $69, though the trip is one hour shorter.

Of course, the inexpensive service still faces some bumps in the road. As one bus prepared to leave Chicago for Indianapolis Saturday morning, flames were spotted in a wheel well. After the fire was put out, the bus was pulled from service and replaced with another. megabuspromotioncodenow.com megabus promotion code

Joe Stanfield, a 23-year-old art dealer from Chicago, was waiting to board another megabus to St. Louis, where he was going to attend a bachelor party. He said he had seen a lot of strange things on buses around the country, but not a fire. “That’s a first,” he said. “And I hope it’s the last.” The incident highlights safety concerns that have been raised about low-fare buses in recent years. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has recently stepped up scrutiny of inexpensive bus services running between Northeastern cities like Boston and Washington. Last year, buses run by Boston-based Fung Wah Bus Transportation Inc. and Travel Pack caught fire on the road.

Dale Moser, president of Coach USA, says he didn’t know about the incident, but that “we take all those issues very seriously.” He says the company has the most stringent preventive measures in the industry, inspecting its 18 buses every 6,000 miles or 45 days, and its drivers’ accreditation and work patterns meet federal standards, such as being limited to 10-hour shifts.

Low ridership forced the company to cancel service to and from Columbus, Ohio, but Moser says megabus is contemplating other routes in the Midwest. Expansion outside of the Midwest isn’t in the company’s plans, though he didn’t rule it out.

Because passengers book tickets online and megabus has no passenger terminals of its own (it stores its buses in downtown Chicago), expenses are kept to a minimum, about $15,000 a week, he says. Costs come to about $1.70 per mile traveled, so a Milwaukee- Chicago one-way trip totals about $160. “If I see us getting just north of 50 percent [seat capacity] that makes me extremely happy,” he says.

Still, rivals say they’re not too worried. An Amtrak spokesman says it has a much different clientele of overnight business travelers. “It’s really a different product,” the spokesman says. Greyhound says its customers can walk in and buy a ticket on the day they travel, rather than having to reserve it online. Then, they can wait in terminals with wireless Internet and TV sets.

While megabus coaches do have bathrooms, other amenities could go missing. One recent bus left Chicago for St. Louis with a broken air conditioner, so the driver climbed atop a seat and wedged a plastic bottle into the emergency exit to generate some air flow. “For $8, I can’t really complain,” says passenger Ryan Pearson, 24. “If it was like a Greyhound bus or a full-price bus I would have been angry, but I was like, ‘Yeah, whatever. What can you do?’” Timothy W. Martin

32 Comments

  1. Avrahim Chesterfield -  September 2, 2013 - 7:36 pm

    Dearly beloved,

    I have read all of your comments, and I have some comments of my own. If Rosh HaShannah represents the new year of Judiasm, how do we ask God to forgive those that we have sinned(missing the mark, bulls eye)against,? In light of Yom Kippur, the most solemn day of Judiam and since Herod’s Temple was destroyed in 70 A.D.. There are NO ARE NO MORE HIGH PRIESTS, NO HOLY OF HOLIES, NO ARK OF THE COVENANT, NO MERCY SEAT, NO CURTAIN…Where is the kaporah for the sins you have committed? And even if you did sacrifice an animal, which is without blemish, an animal’s blood could never forgive your sins could they, otherwise why would you celebrate Yom Kippur year after year after year, correct? The only way we can forgiven for our sins, is found in Tanakh, in Leviticus 17:11…,WITHOUT THE SHEDDING OF BLOOD THERE IS NO REMISSION OF SINS….Do you understand what that means. It means that only a perfect human body/person could atone for sins once and for all…..and that was Yeshua Ha Mashiach. People wake up the Messiah has already come, he fulfilled over 300 prophecies from the Tenakh. What are the chances of any one human being who is living today to fulfill even 1 prophecy? The odds of one prophecy being fulfilled would be equivalent to dumping billions of silver dollars into Dallas, Texas and marking one coin with a X on one side of the coin and you try to find it…there it is, but Yeshua did fulfill the prophecies and HE is beyond a shadow of doubt the promised Mashiach. One last question….if the Mashiach was to come today, how would you recognize HIM? If you were die right now, where would you spend all eternity? I know, would you like to know more….?

    Reply
  2. shlomo the jew -  June 13, 2013 - 4:54 pm

    i’m a modern orthodox jew and i disagree with the statement that all religeons are equal. i also think that jesus is not a son of G-D.

    Reply
  3. Diane -  September 25, 2012 - 7:48 am

    According to my 2012 calendar, Rosh Hashanah is on Sept 17th. Yom Kippur is onthe 26th. Obviously, it changes each year — with the moon cycles.

    Reply
  4. Lorraine -  November 22, 2010 - 10:13 am

    My daughter has homework on The Fesitval of Rosh Hashanah, the question shes has is to name three lessons non Jews could learn from this festival

    Reply
  5. KT -  October 13, 2010 - 10:33 pm

    To KI from KT,

    Thank you for your resolution! It has inspired me so, I have adopted it as my own this year as well:)

    Reply
  6. CK -  September 13, 2010 - 1:31 am

    Amy-Lou, my pleasure! Glad you found it helpful! Thank you for responding.

    Reply
  7. AMY-LOU -  September 10, 2010 - 9:25 am

    Thanks ck for answering my question!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! And i 100% agree with you “P.S. All religions can’t be the same if Jesus claims to be not only the Son of God who, as he himself predicted, would die to atone for our sins, but also claimed to be the way, the truth (Greek = reality), and the life, and that no one comes to the Father (God) except through him (Jesus). If Jesus is the only way, then there is a big difference. Not narrow minded but if he is truth, then this is true. Either as C.S. Lewis put it, Jesus was deluded and didn’t know it – but he had no inconsistencies or indications of insanity whatsoever – or he was a liar of the worst type – again no evidence of this but the opposite – or he was in fact who and what he claimed to be. I set out years ago to discover the invalidity of the Bible and Jesus’ claims. Well, as others who have tried, I found I couldn’t find the evidence against the Bible and Jesus. Instead, whenever taken and tested to the end, I’ve found him real and true … and for that matter, the one who is my life. Think about it.”

    Reply
  8. RAMADAN | BLOGCHI@mayopia.com -  September 10, 2010 - 1:04 am

    [...] our Plasma twice a week to keep food in our mouth — And never ever noticed any rash. — “Eid al-Fitr” if she’s hungry — “Rosh Hash, Hanna” or some soup. — Maybe [...]

    Reply
  9. Angel -  September 9, 2010 - 4:41 am

    I think it is wonderful to hear people from different faiths rejoicing together. It is nice to see people acknowledging the many similarities between our faiths. It gives me tremendous hope for my children’s future.

    Reply
  10. a human! no boo boo or duck any more -  September 9, 2010 - 2:48 am

    Making atonement for your sin is to smile with no hidden agenda! For I am for the enegy policy of stand-alone equipment to be pervasive. No sense to go into war for oil if change in everyday life is made for no denendency on oil.

    For personal instance, we will see.

    Reply
  11. CK -  September 8, 2010 - 9:07 pm

    P.S. All religions can’t be the same if Jesus claims to be not only the Son of God who, as he himself predicted, would die to atone for our sins, but also claimed to be the way, the truth (Greek = reality), and the life, and that no one comes to the Father (God) except through him (Jesus). If Jesus is the only way, then there is a big difference. Not narrow minded but if he is truth, then this is true. Either as C.S. Lewis put it, Jesus was deluded and didn’t know it – but he had no inconsistencies or indications of insanity whatsoever – or he was a liar of the worst type – again no evidence of this but the opposite – or he was in fact who and what he claimed to be. I set out years ago to discover the invalidity of the Bible and Jesus’ claims. Well, as others who have tried, I found I couldn’t find the evidence against the Bible and Jesus. Instead, whenever taken and tested to the end, I’ve found him real and true … and for that matter, the one who is my life. Think about it.

    Reply
  12. CK -  September 8, 2010 - 8:50 pm

    Amy-Lou – There are Jews who know Jesus as their Messiah and may celebrate Rosh Hashana and/or Chanukah since these are new year and historical remembrances of the Lord’s loving protection and deliverance of His people. Christians who do not have a Jewish background would have no reason to celebrate these as this is not their heritage, unless you are invited to join Jewish friends in this. For example, I have been invited to and have shared Passover celebrations with Jewish friends as well as Messianic Jewish friends (that is exciting as you learn so much!) Neither Messianic Jews nor non-Jewish Christians would celebrate Yom Kippur. Instead, we pray and confess our sins daily as we would ask any friend or family to forgive us when we are insensitive or wrong them but of course, we ultimately must go to our Lord God. Many Christians also concentrate on repentence and seeking the Lord to walk in relationship with Him more closely at special seasons such as Advent and Lent, because we understand Yeshua/Jesus as God’s paschal or passover lamb who atones for our sins. This is not to offend anyone but to clarify Christian beliefs and for your own investigation. I’m sure there are some Messianic Jews who will join their family or close friends for any holiday but we have come to understand the fulfillment of the law and prophecies in Messiah Jesus. Hope this helps.

    Reply
  13. Ed -  September 8, 2010 - 7:07 pm

    I am Jewish by birth and became a Christian by adoption — adopted by Christ. This makes me a “Messianic” Jew — one who believes in the Messiah , such as practically the entire first church in the Bible. Praise God — and for those of you who haven’t tried it — go to your local deli and order bagels and lox for breakfast!!!

    Reply
  14. naanaz mehr -  September 8, 2010 - 12:13 pm

    SALAM….I agree with you…HAPPY EID TO ALL MUSLIMS AROUND THE WORLD!!!

    Reply
  15. mohammad arshad -  September 8, 2010 - 11:56 am

    all relegions are beautifull its what people do because of either knowledge or ignorance.

    Reply
  16. ranno -  September 8, 2010 - 11:44 am

    AMY-LOU…in answer to your question: as Born Again Christians, we do not have to take part in the Jewish Feasts/Ceremonies. Under the Old Covenant (before Christ died on the Cross), the ceremonies/sacrifices were required in order for a person to gain forgiveness of their sins. Now that Christ has come and died on the Cross for us, and taken away all our sins (if we repent & ask Him to!) once and for all, we just need to trust in HIM for our salvation, forgiveness and justification. We don’t need to rely on the sacrifices/feasts anymore!!

    Reply
  17. ROSH HASHANA | BLOGCHI@mayopia.com -  September 8, 2010 - 11:38 am

    [...] “HAPPY NEW YEAR”, “HOLY MOSES” — It’s the ritual that’s the fun — but it ain’t that much for fun no more when religion carries a gun. — Eid ul-Fitr is in a day or so — the end of Ramadun. — We know about the neighbor thing — and the pettiness of difference of opinion — where hypocritical is the ending and beginning of Dominion. — Have a “Cup a Joe” without a “Haymarket Affair” or “Take a Hike” if you want to. — “It’s “Deja Vu” All over again.” — “Tradition” doesn’t need no more red shoe. [...]

    Reply
  18. nissim -  September 8, 2010 - 11:33 am

    your word blog is wonderful…refreshing…thanks

    Reply
  19. Adam -  September 8, 2010 - 11:18 am

    Ibrahim I could not agree with you more.

    Reply
  20. GODS' HELPER -  September 8, 2010 - 10:44 am

    OKAY WHY DON’T YOU TRY THIS!!!!! GIVE EVERYONE YOU SEE A SMILE TODAY AND MAKE TODAY GOOD FOR SOME ONE ELSE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  21. Psalm 139 -  September 8, 2010 - 10:41 am

    Birdlaugh, you don’t have to be Jewish to eat the bread. Anyone and everyone is welcome to eat the bread. It can be found is some “speical” stores – It is called Kosher. Kosher food are foods that meet the standards of Jewish dietary laws. The dietary laws are very extensive and include restrictions on the types of animals that may or may not be eaten. The Kosher markets will have the bread that you seek.
    All the best and You can celebrate Rosh Hashanah if you want – but that would be like a Jew celebrating Christmas. It does not have the same meaning for you as it does for Jews. Jews are making atonement for their sins. As Christians – the belief is that Jesus die for your sins and has completed the atonement – you are welcome to celebrate it but it would almost be like saying, “Jesus, you did not atone for my sins so I need to do it myself.” Do you understand what I am saying.
    You can find more information here: http://www.jewfaq.org/kashrut
    Shabbath, Psalm 139

    Reply
  22. CATHERINE -  September 8, 2010 - 10:39 am

    I love being a christian!!!!!!!!!! I love learning about Jewish peoples ways. When i find out more i feel so much closer to GOD and of course JESUS CHRIST!!!!!!!!!!!!! I LOVE THE JEWS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  23. Ibrahim -  September 8, 2010 - 10:23 am

    Salaam. I’m a Muslim and we also have a lunar calendar and are currently in the last couple of days of Ramadhan, our holy month of fasting between dawn and dusk. This Jewish tradition sounds similar to ours in that we abstain from food and drink and repent. May God have mercy on us all, and teach us all to live in harmony and respect one another. In particular, the People of The Book, i.e. Abrahamic religions, as we essentially believe in the same One God of Adam, Abraham and Moses (peace be upon them all).

    Reply
  24. Joshua Aguilar -  September 8, 2010 - 10:04 am

    This is awesome. We learn all about Jewish tradition and lifestyle in Bible study.

    Reply
  25. #1 Skillet fan -  September 8, 2010 - 10:03 am

    My Grandmother’s Birthday is September 17th!!! That is soooooooo Cool :) thanks for the info :)

    Reply
  26. Brenda Powell -  September 8, 2010 - 9:45 am

    I am blessed to hear of the prayer at sunset. I am a Christian. The more I hear about the Jewish practices, the more I respect my Christian beliefs. The symbols all lead to Christ.

    I love the Jewish people.

    Reply
  27. tom -  September 8, 2010 - 9:27 am

    I can’t wait to celebrate

    Reply
  28. AMY-LOU -  September 8, 2010 - 9:27 am

    That is so cool. I had no idea. But one question, i’m a christian so i’m an adopted Jew by the Bible. So does that make today ROSH HASHANA for me to?

    Reply
  29. Birdlaugh -  September 8, 2010 - 8:49 am

    I wish I were a Jew. I want to eat their bread because it always smells good.

    Reply
  30. David E. -  September 8, 2010 - 8:41 am

    Rosh Hashana comes from Hebrew and simply means “beginning of the year.”

    Actually, rosh means “head”, which can be used as beginning.

    The Hebrews used a lunar calendar long before the Gregorian calendar established the system used around the world. The Jewish calendar contains 12 months and consists of 353 to 355 days.

    That’s not wholly correct. The Jewish calendar is “luni-solar“. This is because Judaism requires that Sukkoth be in autumn, and Pesach in the springtime.

    Therefore, every 3rd, 6th, 8th, 11th, 14th, 17th, and 19th year of every 19-year cycle (Am 5757 was the end of the last cycle), there is a 13th month added, Adar II. (This year, 5771, is such a year.) Thus, the Jewish year can be one of six lengths: 353-355 or 383-385.

    ~David E.~

    Reply
  31. Nat Jay -  September 8, 2010 - 8:25 am

    Rosh Hashana literally means ‘first of the year’ or ‘head of the year’. It is also believed that no work is permitted on this day.

    Reply
  32. To J.D. from K.I. -  September 8, 2010 - 8:24 am

    On September 17, I have a dentist appointment. I have a couple more tooth to be fixed. Abstaining from eating is out of the question. Do any Jew eat and pray of repentance?

    My resolution of this year is to think twice and smile twice before I do anything.

    Reply

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