Dictionary.com

Farther vs. Further

farther

Do you use farther and further interchangeably? You’re not alone. These two terms have very similar meanings and English speakers have been using them interchangeably for centuries. However, there are subtle differences between the terms, and the distinction that informs good usage is fairly straightforward. Let’s take a look.

The widely accepted rule is to use farther to discuss physical distances, as in “He went farther down the road.” Further should be used for figurative distance or to discuss degree or extent, as in ”I wanted to discuss it further, but we didn’t have time.”

Additionally, you can further, or advance, a project, but you can’t farther a project—farther doesn’t have a verb sense. Further also has an adverbial sense of “moreover; additionally,” so you can say “Further, you hurt my feelings,” but not farther.

While the above is a general guide to good usage, the physical vs. figurative distance distinction isn’t always adhered to in popular usage, a fact that you’ll find reflected in our definitions for these two terms. However, knowing the difference between good usage and popular usage will set you apart in formal settings and in the company of style-guide devotees.

We hope this explanation has furthered your understanding of these two terms!

412 Comments

  1. Random -  November 20, 2016 - 6:46 am

    Furthermore, being in eighth grade, this has helped me further my education in the art of languages.

    Reply
    • special -  December 1, 2016 - 10:02 am

      This has also helped he further my conversations with my teachers.

      Reply
  2. lisa -  August 15, 2016 - 5:07 pm

    mmmm, idk what to say but i think father lol

    btw dont pick farther cuz i did

    Reply
    • lisa -  August 15, 2016 - 5:08 pm

      also, dont repeat answers

      Reply
  3. kevin -  July 14, 2016 - 4:47 am

    hi everyone

    Reply
    • juan -  July 20, 2016 - 4:25 pm

      I used to drive motorcycle farther, like Manila?
      Let me explain to you further, before the actual test?

      Reply
  4. kevin -  July 14, 2016 - 4:46 am

    should i go farther or further?

    Reply
    • Lol -  July 17, 2016 - 1:07 pm

      Father

      Reply
    • Iqbal Ahmed -  September 21, 2016 - 3:31 am

      It depends…
      If you are referring to the physical distance, then it is “Should I go farther”.

      If you are referring to the figurative distance or progress, then it is “I go further”.

      Reply
  5. BRANDON BROWN -  May 24, 2016 - 1:15 pm

    hi

    Reply
  6. Gerry Smith -  April 11, 2016 - 9:42 pm

    further more I will go farther then you.

    Reply
    • Aidan Parker -  April 19, 2016 - 11:38 am

      Than*

      Reply
      • naruti -  April 21, 2016 - 2:04 pm

        loll owned

        Reply
        • Jacob -  August 29, 2016 - 6:26 pm

          *lol

          Reply
    • margaret -  May 16, 2016 - 3:17 pm

      …Than you… not then….

      Reply
    • Lee Mueller -  May 23, 2016 - 2:08 pm

      Sportswriters learn the difference early. Farther = distance. Further = additionally.

      Reply
      • Trevor -  June 1, 2016 - 3:19 pm

        To be accurate, it’s not “further more” but “furthermore”. Look it up right here on Dictionary.com It’s a conjuction of two or more words, like hitherto, notwithstanding, likeminded, fainthearted or henceforth.

        Reply
  7. frank archambeau -  February 1, 2016 - 11:40 pm

    Further is depth, Farther is distance. Furthermore this has become too deep.
    Why go farther down this road? .

    Reply
    • Joy -  March 16, 2016 - 8:41 am

      I couldn’t help but sing “Further over farther every time, my dear” in my best Ben Howard impression.

      On a serious note, thanks for the succinct explanation!

      Reply
    • Patricia -  April 7, 2016 - 1:58 pm

      I remember seeing Tony Randall on the Johnny Carson show ages ago. I will never forget what he said about farther and further. Farther is for distance and further is used for time. An easy way to remember is that in the word farther is ‘far’ (distance).

      Reply
      • Lisa -  April 12, 2016 - 8:20 am

        Excellent AND Simple.
        I would have come out with a paragraph explaining the differences between further and farther. Giving different sentences for each word to help better understand my explanation. Your explanation could not have explained it better!
        Thanks!!!

        Reply
  8. Matt -  November 2, 2015 - 5:32 pm

    I have seen further used by many well-established writers to address a physical distance. The only rule I think you need to remember is that farther cannot be used to discuss a figurative distance. But as far as a physical one is concerned, I don’t see why they can’t be used interchangeably. And most often times I prefer the sound of further to farther.

    Reply
    • James Ng -  December 16, 2015 - 5:46 pm

      I agree with you. I thought the writer is going to touch on this, but he didn’t.

      Reply
  9. mercedes -  October 29, 2015 - 11:09 am

    i like ozzy

    Reply
  10. Mikkel -  July 31, 2015 - 2:50 pm

    You haven’t mentioned the fact that the distinction between the two words doesn’t exist in British English whatsoever. They’re not used interchangeably exactly, the one you used is dependent largely on your accent.

    ‘Further’ is favoured as for most of us ‘farther’ sounds the same as ‘father’.

    Reply
    • clarissa mcfairy -  October 9, 2015 - 10:50 pm

      I agree as to ‘further’ being favoured. ‘Further’ and ‘farther’ make #Strange Bedfellows. I don’t care much for either word. If I were an archaeologist, say, I would rather dig deeper than further to discover an artefact. If one has to use it, as in “we walked further along the road”, so be it, but I would rather deepen or expand my understanding of a subject than ‘further’ it.

      Reply
    • alex -  October 27, 2015 - 2:07 am

      Farther sounds like father…? What about farter? What does that sound like to you? Mother, marter, mutter,mudder? When a word shares phonetics, one can usually determine the word by the context of itt.. lame excuse for being lazy. Pronounced correctly, faaaah ther does not realy sound like faaarr thurrr.

      Reply
      • leland -  December 7, 2015 - 5:43 pm

        mother -> martyr (?)

        Reply
    • mercedes -  October 29, 2015 - 11:08 am

      i like it

      Reply
    • David -  December 1, 2015 - 5:29 am

      “Dictionary” is right! Far is distance quite clearly.

      Reply
  11. Frank Casale -  May 10, 2015 - 6:09 pm

    To further your understanding of the English language, you must go farther in your study of English grammar.

    Reply
    • Bob -  May 13, 2015 - 11:19 am

      further in both cases

      Reply
      • Frank Casale -  May 14, 2015 - 6:45 pm

        Sorry, you’re right! Farther is for physical distance.

        Reply
      • JohnB -  July 23, 2015 - 4:01 am

        Agreed…

        Reply
      • kw -  December 8, 2015 - 11:48 am

        No. The usage of both words is correct. I.E., to ‘farther’ your understanding…” ??? Seriously?

        Reply
    • James -  October 17, 2015 - 5:21 pm

      I like that! :)

      Reply
  12. Cynthia -  April 20, 2015 - 3:28 am

    Furthermore is also a word worth mentioning in relation to “further”, especially since in my experience, it’s used more in the adverbial sense than “further” is.

    Reply
  13. Alex Hutcheson -  March 19, 2015 - 1:16 pm

    I have to say it has something to do with sentence structure, like how some people stress about pronouncing the as ‘thuh’ instead of the when the next word starts with a vowel. etc. In this case it’s “I ran farther/ I took it a step further”.

    Reply
  14. larkin -  March 17, 2015 - 9:41 am

    hay girls

    Reply
  15. larkin -  March 17, 2015 - 9:39 am

    sup

    Reply
  16. Ez Reader -  March 15, 2015 - 8:32 pm

    It isn’t as simple as it sounds.
    If I “travel farther up the road”, I continue moving in the same direction, but no destination is implied, so I could be exploring an unfamiliar road for example.
    If I “travel further up the road”, I am using a metaphor for progression to imply that I am getting closer to my destination.
    If I “move further along in my career”, my career probably has a fixed plan of progression and I am getting closer to my career goal.
    If I “move farther along in my career”, I am using a metaphor for physical distance meaning that my career is advancing in some sense but does not imply that I am getting closer to a career goal.

    Reply
    • James -  October 17, 2015 - 5:30 pm

      That’s amazing! This is a perfect example of what makes life so interesting and unpredictable. Just when you thought you had everything figured out, BAM. You live and you learn. Every single day! :)

      Reply
    • Andy -  November 10, 2015 - 10:06 am

      And, in all of those examples, you want that comma inside of the quotation marks (for US English).

      Reply
  17. Psylph -  March 15, 2015 - 5:47 pm

    “Farther up and further in”

    – Aslan

    Reply
    • Nona Strickland -  March 23, 2015 - 5:49 am

      I am 12 years old. When I was 8 years old my father raped me. I don’t dwerll on that anymore. That don’t make who I am

      Reply
      • wtf -  March 26, 2015 - 3:46 pm

        That is not something to joke about. No reason to put things like that on this site and we can tell you were trying to put some crude humor out, because you just voluntarily shared that with everyone for no reason.

        Reply
        • Chooki -  May 12, 2016 - 1:17 pm

          Perhaps she needed to share. Try not to judge.

          Reply
  18. Gram -  March 15, 2015 - 5:32 pm

    Farther is physical distance. Further is not. I think the people who say, “I don’t care” are really saying, “I don’t get it”. And to the person who said, “Me and my sister…..”, it’s “My sister and I….). Come on, people, let’s not get sloppy with our English language.

    Also, consider “your/you’re”, “who/whom” and “there, their and they’re”. Proof read before you send, especially when sending in the cover letter with your job application.

    Reply
    • Connie Dramble -  March 22, 2015 - 5:56 am

      Agreed. So nice to see other folks, (besides myself), wanting to further the proper use of our English language… furthermore, while our endeavor should bring us further along, I’m quite sure our path is a little farther than the eye can see.

      Reply
      • Fernanda -  April 11, 2015 - 5:07 am

        It sucks to see so much prejudice around here.

        Reply
        • Frank Casale -  April 27, 2015 - 8:03 pm

          Fernanda, I’m not sure what context in which your using the word ‘prejudice’. Or if the word ‘prejudice’ is, indeed, the right word.

          Reply
          • Trevor -  June 1, 2016 - 3:26 pm

            Prejudice is a most literal word… pre- and -judice. Before, to judge. To arrive at a conclusion before considering the evidence; to prejudge. Hence, as a verb, e.g. to prejudice the outcome.

      • Frank Casale -  April 27, 2015 - 7:58 pm

        Connie, I am also one of those people ‘wanting to further the proper use of the English language’.

        Reply
      • Harun Trikha -  July 23, 2015 - 7:31 am

        Ha Ha….brilliant! Clever piece of text enunciating the difference in use of ‘farther’ and ‘further’

        Reply
    • Frank Casale -  April 27, 2015 - 7:53 pm

      I’m in total agreement, Gram.

      Reply
    • Frank Casale -  May 6, 2015 - 3:50 pm

      Especially if you want the job!

      Reply
    • Bob -  May 13, 2015 - 11:27 am

      Proofread is a compound word.

      Reply
    • Cindy -  June 11, 2015 - 9:15 am

      And, while we’re at it, “proofread” is one word. Take it from me—I am a proofreader.

      Reply
    • Mikkel -  July 31, 2015 - 2:53 pm

      When the majority of people ignore an imagined semantic rule, then it is no rule. Style guides insist there’s a difference but we are not beholden to them, they’re not the arbiters of the English language.

      Reply
    • Brent -  August 17, 2015 - 10:16 am

      I think when people say, “I don’t care”, they are in fact rejecting responsibility for correct usage in the broadest possible sense of it. In other words, if I learn and remain conscious of correct usage of “further/farther”, then I’m on the hook for being responsible for correct usage in every instance. They’re admitting to themselves that they’ve probably got a lot to learn about correct usage. Do I or don’t I want to take on responsibility for this common shortcoming in contemporary communication? Wish the answer was an automatic “yes” but it appears that mauling the language to a crude pidgin is the prevailing attitude. Communication Technology has largely been responsible for the latter.

      Reply
      • kw -  December 8, 2015 - 11:57 am

        “Wish the answer was an automatic “yes” but it appears that mauling the language to a crude pidgin is the prevailing attitude.” This should be “wish the answer were an automatic ‘yes’… ” Use of the word wish is conditional, similar to using ‘if.’ Therefore, use were, not was.

        Reply
    • Andy -  November 10, 2015 - 10:11 am

      If you’re going to chastise people for the subtleties of the English language, then get your punctuation correct. In US English, commas and periods ALWYAS go inside of the quotation marks — despite what Jeopardy and Wikipedia do. It’s a hard and fast rule for us. British get to contextualize when periods/commas go inside. We do not. We only contextualize question and exclamation marks.

      For example: I think the people who say, “I don’t care” are really saying, “I don’t get it.”

      So, there’s that …

      Reply
      • kw -  December 8, 2015 - 12:01 pm

        Glad you brought up Jeopardy. The Clues Crew thinks IBM, LOL, IMHO, etc. are acronyms. They are not. Neither are any shortcuts that do not make a word. These are initialisms, not acronyms. Jeopardy had a category a couple of weeks ago called Texting Acronyms. Yes, I sent the Clues Crew an email. Acronyms make words out of the first letters of a string or words, e.g. scuba, radar, idiwidgar, and several dozen others.

        Reply
  19. Bill Romance -  March 15, 2015 - 10:31 am

    Bless you hearts folks,thank you for this information …. I’m always looking to further my knowledge on a daily basis, and because it’s on my computer, I don’t have to walk farther to get it.

    Reply
  20. meow -  March 14, 2015 - 4:48 pm

    Further

    Reply
  21. Matt B. -  March 13, 2015 - 1:20 pm

    According to The Online Etymology Dictionary (etymonline.com), “There is no historical basis for the notion that farther is of physical distance and further of degree or quality,” as “further” (from Old English) originally indicated physical distance, and later acquired metaphorical meanings, as many spatial words do, and “farther” wasn’t coined until c. 1300.

    Reply
    • Yes! -  May 15, 2015 - 5:17 am

      ^this^

      This blurb makes no mention of differences between English as spoken in America – in which this tendency to use both is found – and that as spoken in England where you almost never hear “farther”. It may exist in the OED, but since “further” can be used legitimately in both instances, the tendency is to use it in all cases.

      Reply
      • Yes! -  May 15, 2015 - 5:21 am

        * “This blurb” meaning the original post and not that to which I was replying, and OED = Oxford English Dictionary. Apologies for any confusion!

        Reply
  22. you got that groovy -  March 13, 2015 - 7:15 am

    you got that groovy? I do.

    Reply
  23. James Aboud -  March 13, 2015 - 7:03 am

    You have unleashed the farther of all battles!

    Reply
  24. james dalton -  March 13, 2015 - 1:04 am

    OOOH burn…..two things: one, yonder never went away, at least to those born and raised in Lancashire, England, UK. Also “Aye” for yes. And second, you are quite correct, it is the generation of people taught by teachers who themselves were never taught correctly. Is anyone commenting old enough to remember the disastrous foray into phonetic spelings in the 70s? I woz. and it woz teribul. But did not last long.
    In my twilight years now, I lecture in a college. I see my colleague’s writings and resources they prepare for students and my heart sinks. Yet no-one seems to care, they regard it as unimportant compared to the politically correct duty of care. So this will have a cumulative effect unless some old fogies like me insist on people who were born or who choose to live in England learning the language and how to spell it, as well as how to use it. But there are not many of us left. There is far too much reliance on spellcheck. It’s called laziness. And they never get corrected at home (because the parents often do not know any better) so if they never get corrected at school either what chance do they have?
    That was probably five rather than two, but this site has tempted me to write for so long I had to cram it all in. And don’t get me started on textspeak…….

    Reply
    • kw -  December 8, 2015 - 12:08 pm

      With respect for your surviving the ’70s phonetic insults to our beloved language, and in celebration of our venerability, your tiny error in “I see my colleague’s writings and resources they prepare for students…” is one of the most common and frustrating in written communication. I’m sure you have caught the error already, but for those who do not know the difference, it should be ‘I see my colleagues’ writings and resources …’

      Reply
  25. Cerulean -  March 12, 2015 - 12:27 am

    Why is this so hard for everyone? “Farther” is “more far.” It is the comparative of “far” because “far-er” is unintelligible without extra consonants. It doesn’t matter whether it’s literally far or figuratively far, as long as “far” is the word you would use.

    “Further” means “to a greater extent.” You can use it in place of the adverb “farther” in almost every situation because one logically implies the other. If you have walked a longer distance, it follows that you have walked more.

    You only “explain further” but not “farther” because you don’t “explain far.” You see?

    Reply
    • Psylph -  March 15, 2015 - 5:46 pm

      This ^

      Reply
    • cuc -  March 16, 2015 - 8:42 pm

      nerd

      Reply
  26. 7th grader -  March 11, 2015 - 9:58 am

    further

    Reply
    • Get Rekt -  March 16, 2015 - 7:09 am

      Get back to class youngblood

      Reply
  27. bob -  March 11, 2015 - 9:51 am

    bla bla bla. this is as stupid a monkeys butt

    Reply
    • bob is stupid -  March 15, 2015 - 1:05 am

      i think your the stupid one hahahahahahahahahaha

      Reply
      • Nona Strickland -  March 23, 2015 - 5:49 am

        Stop cybulbulling

        Reply
        • Frank Casale -  April 16, 2015 - 7:43 am

          Nona, that’s “cyber bullying”.

          Reply
    • Michael -  March 16, 2015 - 2:04 am

      Why do you come to a blog article centered on the exploration and discussion of linguistics to declare your disinterest? It’s a commonly accepted fact that the internet has a huge variety of subjects; compared to some of most obscene, this one really isn’t that peculiar. Your comment is pretty irrelevant. Furthermore, if your sentence was properly formed, maybe it would have more efficacy. Poorly written, and pointless. I suggest you explore other departments of the internet that are a better use of your time rather than proving that stupid comments are stupid.

      Reply
      • The real grammar nazi -  March 26, 2015 - 3:53 pm

        *Efficiency

        Reply
        • Grammar not-zi -  October 7, 2015 - 11:35 pm

          *efficacy.
          It’s a real word, and makes sense in this context, unlike “efficiency”. ;)

          Reply
      • Sue Hales -  April 17, 2015 - 1:25 pm

        Sorry, but it was “uninterest” that was declared, not “disinterest.” That’s what you get when you post on a language discussion board :-)

        Reply
      • Yvy -  December 23, 2015 - 6:39 am

        No one mentioned that “if your sentence was properly formed” should be “if your sentence were properly formed”.

        Reply
    • Bob's Mom -  March 17, 2015 - 11:09 am

      Quiet son, go eat your vegetables.

      Reply
  28. Victor -  March 11, 2015 - 8:47 am

    Gfffggbcf

    Reply
  29. Victor -  March 11, 2015 - 8:46 am

    I personally think its dhkjbsddkjbsdckjbsdckjskdjcbskdjcbsdkcj

    Reply
  30. Bob -  March 11, 2015 - 7:59 am

    We need to bring back the use of the word “yonder”

    Reply
    • RANDOM PERSON -  March 13, 2015 - 9:25 am

      YESSSSSSSSS! My friend gets confused when her grandparents say it, because they don’t tell her which direction they mean by ‘yonder’. Now I have to go over yonder, so goodbye!

      Reply
      • Frank Casale -  April 16, 2015 - 7:52 am

        Time to hit the trail! I have to go over yonder!

        Reply
  31. why -  March 10, 2015 - 3:13 pm

    why you all don’t get it one means something else from the other. me=smart

    Reply
  32. MC515 -  March 10, 2015 - 2:51 pm

    When Eric Clapton performs Bobby Blue Bland’s “Farther up the Road” he changes it to “Further on up the road.”

    Reply
    • Ron -  July 17, 2015 - 12:36 pm

      This is the best comment in this entire thread, MC515. How about this dialogue? “How fur is it to yer still, Joe Bob?” “Oh, she’s a fur piece, Bubba.” In this regional (Southern USA) usage “far” and “fur” are synonymous.

      Reply
  33. Fudge there -  March 10, 2015 - 1:32 pm

    Sup I don’t even care about this

    Reply
    • Mekhi durant -  March 12, 2015 - 1:43 pm

      further

      Reply
    • Get Rekt -  March 16, 2015 - 7:08 am

      Then why did you bother commenting or even clicking the link?

      Reply
  34. Isabella Cox -  March 10, 2015 - 11:49 am

    Me and my sister both say “further” but I guess it doesn’t matter which you use.

    Reply
  35. Mandi =) -  March 10, 2015 - 10:38 am

    I think this is a good argument, but i think it depends on how you use both of the words

    Reply
    • Emilia Vazquez -  March 12, 2015 - 1:41 pm

      you suck

      Reply
  36. Demetrius -  March 10, 2015 - 9:13 am

    I think that further is the correct term to use when talking. People rarely use the word farther over further

    Reply
    • Jasmine Slate -  March 10, 2015 - 1:34 pm

      I agree, I think that further is the correct term to use when talking.

      Reply
      • Jasmine Slate -  March 10, 2015 - 1:41 pm

        MEEP! :b

        Reply
        • Jasmine Slate -  March 10, 2015 - 1:42 pm

          I meant MEEP! :p

          Reply
          • Jasmine Slate -  March 10, 2015 - 1:42 pm

            ; D

          • Jasmine Slate -  March 10, 2015 - 1:43 pm

            ;D

          • shira -  March 12, 2015 - 3:20 pm

            father

    • irving -  March 10, 2015 - 2:55 pm

      further discussion does not seem to further our understanding but to lead us father from it.

      Reply
    • Melanie -  March 10, 2015 - 3:10 pm

      I think it does not matter which one you use. It could be anyone of them.

      Reply
    • lulu -  March 10, 2015 - 4:06 pm

      I think those things aren’t important other things are though like…………………..

      Reply
    • natalie -  March 11, 2015 - 1:01 pm

      i think that they are both right.but, that is your opinian.so,you can go with what ever you want or bealive.

      Reply
    • MotherOfThePack -  March 11, 2015 - 2:37 pm

      Little Bear: – “Father How much farther do we have to go?”

      Father Bear: – “Further than you think, son”.

      Reply
    • Bambi lo -  March 11, 2015 - 2:41 pm

      I have lived all my life in China. If you -listen- to the way we use the words, most will naturally use the correctly. So I might ask when traveling the Awesome State, “How long do I have to go to get to… ?” They answer, It’s not too much farther.” It may sound like -further- to non-Texans. OR they may answer, “It’s further down the road.” East Texas usually has more distinction in use and pronunciation. South and West Texas tend to slur speech more and make distinctions more subtle. We have far to go in getting the population to further their education.

      Reply
      • Texan Girl -  March 13, 2015 - 9:45 am

        Yes, we do slur and use slang a lot, but we think it doesn’t matter how you talk, just what you say! And we do not need to ‘further our education’, because many amazing authors and smart people have come out of Texas, such as:
        Adina Emilia De Zavala (1861–1955), writer, historian, educator,
        Jan de Hartog (1914–2002), Nobel Prize-nominated author, Tony Award-winning playwright, social activist, philanthropist,
        Bryan A. Garner (born 1958), lexicographer, grammarian, author, educator,
        and many more.
        I seriously don’t understand your problem with Texas. Thank you for your feedback on the Lone Star State.

        -Me, the 10 year-old girl

        Reply
      • Texan Girl -  March 13, 2015 - 9:48 am

        And you seriously just said “how long to I have to go…”. The correct term would be “how FAR do I have to go…”

        look below

        | | | | | | |
        VVVVVV

        Reply
        • Texan Girl -  March 13, 2015 - 9:48 am

          I did not mean to say “look below.” My apologies.

          Reply
      • lo&behold -  March 15, 2015 - 2:04 pm

        This paragraph makes no sense.

        Reply
    • Emilia Vazquez -  March 12, 2015 - 1:39 pm

      you SUCK

      Reply
  37. John Clarke -  March 10, 2015 - 5:26 am

    I have lived all my life in Texas. If you -listen- to the way we use the words, most will naturally use the correctly. So I might ask when traveling the Great State, “How long do I have to go to get to… ?” They answer, It’s not too much farther.” It may sound like -further- to non-Texans. OR they may answer, “It’s further down the road.” East Texas usually has more distinction in use and pronunciation. South and West Texas tend to slur speech more and make distinctions more subtle. We have far to go in getting the population to further their education.

    Reply
    • Grinder -  March 10, 2015 - 9:55 am

      Why in the world would you say “How LONG do I have to go…?” Presumably, you mean “How FAR do I have to go…”

      Unless you are actually speaking about time, in which case you could ask “How LONG until I get to…”

      Either way, in Texas, the answer will probably be a large number…

      Reply
      • Christian Y -  March 12, 2015 - 2:33 pm

        Haha, sadly we actually do say “how long” even when we aren’t talking about time. At least to my knowledge, we do. For instance on a road trip we might ask “How much longer ’til we get there??” And someone could answer in units of time or miles.

        I’ve never even thought about it, but it’s kind of dumb, I suppose. I’m sure all states have something weird like that.

        Reply
    • An onoumus -  March 10, 2015 - 11:16 am

      I have to say living in minnesota my whole life people up here have a slight canadian accent but it sounds like people change between farther and further depending on the text.

      Reply
    • Martin Jones -  March 10, 2015 - 6:52 pm

      I was under the impression that this was pointing out the correct use of the English language, not American? As Winston Churchill once said “Our two nations have much in common, sadly language is not one of them” :-)

      Reply
    • Jaszebell -  March 11, 2015 - 2:32 pm

      You a so right because I live in Teaxes to and we do say farther and not much further it really doen’t matter to me because it all sounds the same.

      Reply
    • Christian Y -  March 12, 2015 - 2:29 pm

      This is totally true. I think I agree with the argument in this article, but I’m from Texas and we usually say “further down” and not “farther down” even when talking about a physical distance. I’m not sure why this is, and I think it’s incorrect but it sounds so much more natural.

      Reply
  38. bobby -  March 10, 2015 - 4:29 am

    neverheard any of these its actually fither you guys go to youtube and type 2aP,using fither,farther, or further english has bought me lose my marks in exam bu the correct word is fither

    Reply
    • billy -  March 11, 2015 - 10:16 am

      WHAT

      Reply
  39. andrew -  March 10, 2015 - 2:37 am

    thank you dictionary.com this really helps

    Reply
    • Henry, from Mexico -  March 10, 2015 - 11:17 am

      You got that right. I love this dictionary. I wouldn´t do anything right without it.

      Reply
  40. Josh -  March 9, 2015 - 11:14 pm

    Did Darth Vader speak correctly, then, when he said “Luke, I am your farther?” An intriguing pontification.

    Reply
    • abby -  March 10, 2015 - 1:06 pm

      he said father, not farther!

      Reply
    • Jayden -  March 10, 2015 - 4:44 pm

      He didn’t say that. He said no… I am your father.

      Reply
    • Bob -  March 11, 2015 - 7:57 am

      Vader didn’t say “Luke, I am your father.” he said “No! I am your father.” :) jtyltk

      Reply
  41. Anonymous -  March 9, 2015 - 8:17 pm

    Further is obviously the more commonly used word although I’m not sure about farther. FHRITP

    Reply
    • An onoumus -  March 10, 2015 - 11:17 am

      I have to say living in minnesota my whole life people up here have a slight canadian accent but it sounds like people change between farther and further depending on the text.

      Reply
  42. Wisdom -  March 9, 2015 - 5:19 pm

    Further and Farther seem both the same meaning. But due to the spelling, you should know there’s a difference!

    Reply
  43. Me -  March 9, 2015 - 5:07 pm

    Great Blog Post

    Reply
    • Nicolette Nicholson -  March 11, 2015 - 5:14 pm

      great blog ;3 moustache

      Reply
  44. Elizabeth Wood -  March 9, 2015 - 4:43 pm

    Further is the correct literature.

    Reply
  45. malllllllbab -  March 9, 2015 - 4:26 pm

    well bob is bob and will always be bob. BOBBBBBBBBBBBBBB

    Reply
    • dsfg -  March 10, 2015 - 10:25 am

      innit

      Reply
    • bob -  March 10, 2015 - 6:27 pm

      put a tie on a pig its still a pig

      Reply
    • Bob -  March 12, 2015 - 10:09 am

      Yo

      Reply
    • JOE -  March 15, 2015 - 1:41 pm

      not if he changes his name…
      to JOE!!!!!!!

      Reply
    • Bob V -  March 10, 2015 - 11:54 pm

      Let’s go back to the 1300′s middle English! people just got confused nowadays, “Ferther” sounds like our Dutch “Verder” much better indeed :)

      Reply
  46. lava -  March 9, 2015 - 3:51 pm

    what

    Reply
    • natalie -  March 11, 2015 - 1:02 pm

      do you not know what is going on?????

      Reply
  47. Ingrid -  March 9, 2015 - 2:58 pm

    You could fill an entire slideshow with these little things (hint, hint). Farther/further, much/many, high/tall, less/fewer, and so on. They can be hell for ESL students (and hell to teach!)

    Reply
    • Henry, from Mexico -  March 10, 2015 - 11:22 am

      It seems that you KNOW me. I teach ESL in Mexico and hear questions of this nature all the time. And even I sometimes don´t know the answer and have to check the dictionary time and again.

      Reply
  48. lol -  March 9, 2015 - 2:15 pm

    lol

    Reply
  49. someone -  March 9, 2015 - 1:00 pm

    Personally I think its both, because if it fits the situation then it is right! So,I think that both of them are correct!

    Reply
    • malllllllbab -  March 9, 2015 - 4:27 pm

      brah

      Reply
      • Nona Strickland -  March 23, 2015 - 6:08 am

        I love it♥✴♥✴♥♥♥♥

        Reply
    • Bob -  March 9, 2015 - 5:12 pm

      I think it is further, farther just sounds wrong.

      Reply
      • Jake -  March 10, 2015 - 12:24 pm

        It’s true it does not sound right further it is

        Reply
    • shabnam -  March 9, 2015 - 7:08 pm

      I think itsthattoo

      Reply
    • imawesome -  March 9, 2015 - 9:48 pm

      I agree

      Reply
    • Jim -  March 9, 2015 - 10:37 pm

      I suppose you feel the same about “its” and “it’s”?

      Reply
    • Josh -  March 9, 2015 - 11:11 pm

      On long journeys, “The Smurfs” would enquire of Papa Smurf, “How much farther Papa Smurf?”
      If little blue dudes can get it right, so can you. It’s unfortunate that incorrect usage of the English language is socially acceptable (I’m inferring from your statement that you’re in the U.S.A.?). That fact doesn’t make it right though.

      Reply
      • Mikey -  March 10, 2015 - 3:09 pm

        Josh, you spelled inquire wrong

        Reply
    • hihih -  March 10, 2015 - 5:37 am

      kzlfk vzldkfj

      Reply
    • someone else -  March 10, 2015 - 5:38 am

      Not sure what you mean here…Could you elaborate?

      Reply
      • someone else -  March 10, 2015 - 5:39 am

        Not sure what you mean here…Could you elaborate further?

        Reply
    • big dick 37 -  March 10, 2015 - 6:16 am

      you gis be very nerdy

      Reply
    • Chubby Arms -  March 10, 2015 - 6:58 am

      GO TEAM CHUBBY ARMS!

      Reply
    • another -  March 10, 2015 - 7:05 am

      Gloop hoard effervescent liar terp jeep bing pixie sludge.

      ^I feel this fits the situation, therefore the meanings are right?

      Reflection:

      Here, the sentence *is* serving a function greater than its constituents in that I’m using it nonsensically to make a point. However, this is separate from the individual parts literally giving a meaning i.e. contained in and discerned by the meanings of and relations between words. Even if I were to decide upon meanings for them in my own language, or they happen to be coherent in some language, that’s not helpful to communicating information with someone else who doesn’t share the language. The origin of words might start off by picking random things and making up something for them, but a language is established by agreeing upon them at a communal level. In casual conversation, we make a lot of concessions, and so our delivered meaning is more fluid. This is both a thing that can contribute to richness (metaphors) and errors in our language. With something like “farther”, I think it’s a case of mixing homophonic near-synonyms; “farther” is about distance, whilst “further” implies “more” abstractly or temporally (“further conversation” = “more conversation”; “further walking” = “more walking”, hence the confusion for distance). I think there’s a certain texture about each word, which I’ve probably attached because of their intended meanings, and so I feel their difference, and I think it’s important to get that right because they are still different,… and it’s good to maintain that? Although I’m not always going to get that right either.

      Reply
      • another someone -  March 10, 2015 - 7:09 am

        ^I meant to write my name as “someone else”. :P

        Reply
        • John Doe -  March 10, 2015 - 10:36 am

          lol k m8

          Reply
      • cuc -  March 16, 2015 - 8:40 pm

        you are a nerd

        Reply
    • another someone -  March 10, 2015 - 7:12 am

      ^I meant to write my name as “someone else”. :P

      Reply
      • some random someone -  March 11, 2015 - 1:40 pm

        ^I meant to write my name as “someone else”. :)

        Reply
    • someone else -  March 10, 2015 - 7:21 am

      Saying farther is the same as further – even “if it fits the situation” – is like saying affect is the same as effect. They are two related words with completely different meanings. There’s a reason for this article: to help people learn the difference. I would encourage you to do so.

      Reply
      • Tom Ross -  March 12, 2015 - 12:31 pm

        Yes, if words have two distinct meanings, like “affect” and “effect,” one cannot just use whichever one they feel like. But “farther” and “further” have identical definitions, except that “further” has some uses where “farther” doesn’t make sense. When “further” is used as an adverb, in the same way as “furthermore,” saying “farther” would sound awful and is not an option. For other uses, the official rule is that both words are synonymous and interchangeable.

        Reply
        • Simply Steven -  March 13, 2015 - 6:11 pm

          Hi, Tom.
          If you’re speaking of them strictly as adverbs, then I would agree with you.

          However, I will have to respectfully disagree with you if otherwise. Part of the definition of “further” is as a verb, as in, “He furthered his cause by being a great example.” “Farther” does not function the same way.

          Reply
    • daniel -  March 10, 2015 - 7:51 am

      you don’t appear to have learned anything. I think you should study the matter farther.

      Reply
      • S -  March 11, 2015 - 6:25 pm

        ^^ Troll. Don’t feed the trolls any further.

        Reply
      • anonymous bibliophile -  March 11, 2015 - 10:41 pm

        I think you mean further.

        Reply
    • natalie -  March 11, 2015 - 1:03 pm

      I think the same way!!!!

      Reply
      • cuc -  March 16, 2015 - 8:40 pm

        you suck

        Reply
  50. Maisling -  March 9, 2015 - 11:09 am

    I don’t believe I’ve ever heard the word farther used in conversation. Whether it’s technically correct or not, further is the socially accepted norm for both meanings.

    Reply
    • hdslfjahk -  March 9, 2015 - 2:49 pm

      omg that was awes

      Reply
    • Daniel -  March 9, 2015 - 7:22 pm

      I’m not sure about that. It would sound odd to me to hear someone say “I kicked the can further than Tom”. I would always expect them to say they kicked the can “farther” than Tom.

      I do typically hear both versions of this word used in conversation, though I’m sure not always in their correct sense.

      Reply
    • you -  March 9, 2015 - 9:31 pm

      Well then you haven’t had many normal conversations lately, huh kid.

      Reply
  51. Illuminati -  March 9, 2015 - 10:27 am

    I ate a doge and he said if I went further down the road I’d find more doges

    Reply
    • someone -  March 9, 2015 - 1:53 pm

      all I have to say is…………….lol……………………..just lol. :-)

      Reply
      • natalie -  March 11, 2015 - 1:04 pm

        that is a lot of lol’s

        Reply
    • David -  March 9, 2015 - 2:23 pm

      I didn’t realize ancient Venetian rulers were edible…

      Reply
    • imadogesowoof -  March 9, 2015 - 3:00 pm

      Im offended.

      Reply
      • Trevor -  June 1, 2016 - 3:29 pm

        I’m not, so does that cancel your offendedness out?

        Reply
    • the other someone -  March 15, 2015 - 1:31 pm

      Did he tell you that after or before he got eaten?

      Reply
  52. Stinkile -  March 9, 2015 - 9:44 am

    Has anyone else ever been confused by the words there, their and they’re?

    Reply
    • lava -  March 9, 2015 - 3:43 pm

      yes i have

      Reply
    • whoot caressed -  March 9, 2015 - 5:49 pm

      no, i have never been confused by that

      Reply
    • Wallace -  March 9, 2015 - 8:01 pm

      Never!

      Reply
    • sjdavis -  March 9, 2015 - 8:54 pm

      There is an adverb meaning place or position. “I went there last night.” “I stood there for a long time waiting for my friend.”

      Their is a pronoun indicating possession. “Their car is red.”

      They’re is a contraction of the words they are. “They’re going to the movies this weekend.”

      Reply
      • Trevor -  June 1, 2016 - 3:31 pm

        They’re considering their reply over there.

        Reply
    • Blazer -  March 9, 2015 - 11:24 pm

      lol no

      Reply
    • someone else -  March 10, 2015 - 5:40 am

      No. Their distinctions are quite clear.

      Reply
    • Billy -  March 10, 2015 - 5:54 am

      Hey look, they’re having their party over there!

      Reply
      • Corgan -  March 11, 2015 - 5:39 am

        Nice!

        Reply
    • benjamin -  March 11, 2015 - 1:52 pm

      well actually the word “there” means to like go over there “their” means belonging to one or several people and “they’re” is just the abbreviation of they are

      Reply
    • That Someone -  March 11, 2015 - 6:30 pm

      Not once. Not ever. These three, while homonyms, are distinct and separate. There is no reason to confuse their meanings; they’re completely different.

      Reply
    • nina -  March 12, 2015 - 7:37 am

      They’re not there. They’re at their parents’. Their parent’s home are over there. See their cars? They’re lined up over there. (this is a tongue twister or mind twister dedicated for you).

      Reply
  53. Elaine Crittenden -  March 9, 2015 - 8:51 am

    When I taught English Grammar classes to 11 to 13 year old Texans, I used my linguistics training in addition to the book we were required to use. Confused parents would come to me and ask what I was teaching. I would smile and query, ‘You have heard of “new math”? This is “new English”.’ They shook their heads and stopped doing their teen’s homework.

    I enjoy watching the changes in the English language. Think of Shakespeare’s time. The English used now is influenced by the names of commercial products calling attention to themselves by their misspellings. Another variant is the abbreviations occasioned by texting needs. One example would be that “POS” does not mean “Point Of Purchase” as much as it now means “Parent Over Shoulder.”

    Reply
    • David Horton -  March 9, 2015 - 2:20 pm

      Or “piece of ‘crap’” in some contexts…..

      Reply
    • Rick Keller -  March 9, 2015 - 4:00 pm

      The English language is not some list of values and glyphs like a chemistry volume on a shelf in some lab, it is a means of communication that is constantly evolving. If we adhere to rigid rules then we risk stratifying our language and creating new variations. An educator would do well to instill the values of communication and being understood and realize that when someone shakes their head, they’ve lost a follower.
      Interestingly to me, I recognize the abbreviation POS to mean point of sale or a phrase that starts with “piece of,” I’d never seen the term “parent over shoulder” and I have a 14 year old son, am I remiss?

      Reply
    • Cindee -  March 10, 2015 - 12:28 am

      Um, POS means point of sale. Thus the letters POS, not POP…

      Reply
  54. NDIMURWANGO PETER -  March 9, 2015 - 7:45 am

    keep on giving us such knowledgeable words

    Reply
  55. Brooke -  March 9, 2015 - 5:17 am

    I will use them right for now on!!!!

    Reply
    • Ashley -  March 9, 2015 - 5:18 am

      Now they make since to me.

      Reply
      • Kylah -  March 9, 2015 - 5:20 am

        now it is easy to me not hard

        Reply
        • malllllllbab -  March 9, 2015 - 4:28 pm

          totali man

          Reply
        • Chubby Arms -  March 10, 2015 - 6:53 am

          Chubby arms rule.

          Reply
      • JOSH -  March 9, 2015 - 3:15 pm

        <3

        Reply
      • Marge Hesse -  March 19, 2015 - 2:03 pm

        You need to use sense not since.

        Reply
    • raymond Schricker -  March 9, 2015 - 2:12 pm

      A good way i think to remember it is f”a”rther is an “a”ctual distance.
      (The “a” in “farther” means there is an “a”ctual distance :-).
      Also, the “u” in “further” is a fig”u”rative distance.)

      i hope this makes sense.

      Reply
      • raymond Schricker -  March 9, 2015 - 2:16 pm

        i mean that the “u” in “further” means that the distance is fig-”u”-rative.
        It may help to read my comments aloud to understand it more clearly :-p.

        Reply
    • Josh -  March 9, 2015 - 11:12 pm

      Perhaps one day you will also use “for” and “from” correctly! :)

      Reply
      • raymond Schricker -  March 10, 2015 - 5:24 pm

        Is this message to me, Josh?
        i am confused if it is.

        Reply
        • raymond Schricker -  March 24, 2015 - 7:19 pm

          lol. Now i see that is for Brooke. ;-)

          Reply
  56. cooper troy -  March 9, 2015 - 1:07 am

    Further

    Reply
  57. gdanie -  March 8, 2015 - 7:33 pm

    In the United States, though, farther is more often used to refer to physical distances, and further more often refers to figurative and nonphysical distances.

    Reply
    • ariana -  March 9, 2015 - 4:05 pm

      I choose none I mean whats the point of it I mean there the same lol

      Reply
      • That Someone -  March 11, 2015 - 6:38 pm

        *none. *What’s *it. *They’re *same?

        If you’re going to make a comment on a site about English, the least you could do is write in English, not pidgin. Spelling and punctuation count.

        Reply
    • Emily -  March 10, 2015 - 6:50 am

      That’s literally what was said.

      Reply
  58. Bright Dude -  March 8, 2015 - 5:51 pm

    The farther we go the further we’ll learn.

    Reply
    • Marley -  March 10, 2015 - 8:41 am

      Good one, bright dude!

      Reply
  59. bryden chalmers -  March 8, 2015 - 4:33 pm

    it is further
    not farther is a spelling mistake from father

    Reply
    • someone else -  March 10, 2015 - 5:41 am

      No, it is not.

      Reply
    • benjamin -  March 11, 2015 - 1:57 pm

      further is not a spelling mistake from farther but farther is a mistake from further

      Reply
  60. Bob Bobson -  March 8, 2015 - 3:36 pm

    TANGERINES VOTE FOR FAURTHERER

    Reply
    • Jasmine Slate -  March 10, 2015 - 1:38 pm

      What does that mean? :D

      Reply
  61. Sonbob Bob -  March 8, 2015 - 3:34 pm

    No, tangerines are not real because the elephant isn’t the lizard.

    Reply
    • Bob Bobson -  March 8, 2015 - 3:35 pm

      Bob

      Reply
    • Natalie -  March 9, 2015 - 2:45 pm

      I think further is right because farther doesn’t really make sense in a sentence like:
      Farther: The dog went farther and farther.
      Further: The dog went further and further.

      Reply
    • lava -  March 9, 2015 - 3:50 pm

      tangerines are a real fruit.
      tangerine is another name for an orange.

      Reply
      • jerjy -  July 3, 2015 - 10:18 pm

        Limes are vampires.

        Reply
    • Texrog -  March 10, 2015 - 7:06 am

      But Sonbob, the elephant is still in the room but no one wants to talk about it. So the lizard just slinked out and continues to sell insurance.

      Reply
  62. Bob Bobson -  March 8, 2015 - 3:33 pm

    Bob

    Reply
  63. isy davis -  March 8, 2015 - 3:16 am

    further sounds right.But i don’t really know
    #?

    Reply
  64. Mr. Completely -  March 8, 2015 - 1:45 am

    I use a simple mantra: farther is far, further is future

    Reply
    • Idiot -  March 10, 2015 - 9:05 am

      Your an Idiot

      Reply
      • That Someone -  March 11, 2015 - 6:42 pm

        Actually *you’re an idiot. (See what I did there?) ;)

        Reply
      • anonymous bibliophile -  March 11, 2015 - 10:47 pm

        Actually, *you’re.

        Reply
        • Trevor -  June 1, 2016 - 3:33 pm

          He does it on porpoise, you guys!

          Reply
  65. george wu -  March 7, 2015 - 10:50 pm

    Farther and further are both adverbs in the sense of Let me meditate farther as well as Let me meditate further. However, you can’t use farther as a verb, but you can use further to further your meditation.

    Reply
  66. Eric Glare -  March 7, 2015 - 9:11 pm

    Sounds like arguing against the dictionary whilst trying to prevent the evolution of language that has already happened. Farther isn’t in my dialect. With everyone writing now we need better grammar for understanding better instead of intimidating people by insisting on stylistic rather than meaning differences.

    Reply
    • Simply Steve -  March 10, 2015 - 7:25 am

      Using language properly in some circles can mean the difference between being offered the job after an interview and not. Experience speaks!

      Reply
  67. Raven -  March 7, 2015 - 8:05 pm

    It really depends actually.
    example.
    farther down the road
    further more

    Reply
  68. Nompumelelo -  March 7, 2015 - 8:40 am

    This is quite tricky,well
    It must be further.

    Reply
  69. nea.bluebell -  March 7, 2015 - 5:08 am

    I think both work, because you write “furthermore” and “farther down the street” :) or somthing

    Reply
  70. Jimmy Benford -  March 7, 2015 - 4:07 am

    Please bring on the knowledge and take the attitude.

    Reply
  71. Manisha -  March 6, 2015 - 6:08 pm

    This is what is best, the interestingly amazing way the English language is misspoken! ☺

    Reply
    • Susan -  March 6, 2015 - 6:12 pm

      I know right!?

      Reply
  72. Mei Ling He -  March 6, 2015 - 3:39 pm

    It is farther because further does not make sense

    Reply
  73. sharpshorts -  March 6, 2015 - 3:32 pm

    The farther down that road we go, the further lost we become.

    Reply
  74. john -  March 6, 2015 - 10:17 am

    On point

    Reply
  75. Dyurth -  March 6, 2015 - 7:18 am

    Luke, I am your further. Neh, didn’t think so!

    Reply
    • abby -  March 10, 2015 - 1:11 pm

      Yeah, me neither!

      Reply
  76. Trey Brant -  March 6, 2015 - 5:37 am

    The main reasons for using these two distinctions, namely ‘further’ and ‘farther,’ is for one to realistically and further expand one’s own vocabulary and not to merely move farther along the path with the academics who use the language in such a way, but rather to enable oneself to express things with greater precision and to think more clearly. The practicality of making such distinctions is so interwoven into the uses of these words that it is taken for granted by those who use them properly and should be. The improper uses of the terms are perpetuated via the English as a Second Language industry and makes the English language appear less sophisticated than it really is.

    Reply
    • Cindee -  March 10, 2015 - 12:32 am

      Well said!

      Reply
  77. Crazy Larry -  March 6, 2015 - 4:46 am

    Its fither,but I’m just crazy so I don’t know.

    Reply
  78. Kid -  March 6, 2015 - 12:17 am

    All
    Da same
    I don’t give

    Reply
  79. Amer Nassar -  March 5, 2015 - 10:06 pm

    I never tried further to compare in between, but now I`m going farther deep in my mind remembering ,searching,adapting and thinking about.
    My first time unfortunately and suddenly, enter this sit. Its my favorite.

    Reply
  80. Moises Garcia -  March 5, 2015 - 9:39 pm

    Who cares

    Reply
  81. killua -  March 5, 2015 - 4:41 pm

    LAME

    Reply
    • Simply Steve -  March 10, 2015 - 7:26 am

      Good luck on your future then.

      Reply
  82. killua -  March 5, 2015 - 4:41 pm

    this is stupid tbh

    Reply
  83. ADKABDD AAKBQVI -  March 5, 2015 - 4:08 pm

    I think it is further, because it was more sense when you talk to someone. For example “You will see the stop sign further down the road”.

    Reply
  84. Alex V -  March 5, 2015 - 3:42 pm

    His hyperbolic examples took things to fur. (?)

    Reply
  85. Isabella Cox -  March 5, 2015 - 1:30 pm

    I always use further I guess because I’m southern.

    Reply
  86. Lame Dude -  March 5, 2015 - 9:25 am

    It’s all lame

    Reply
    • tanmay -  March 5, 2015 - 11:11 am

      no it isn’t.

      Reply
    • i dont no -  March 5, 2015 - 1:22 pm

      i agree

      Reply
    • ???? -  March 5, 2015 - 2:57 pm

      How is this lame? This is helping you learn the two differences between farther and further. Learn something dude!

      Reply
    • pizza_guy -  March 5, 2015 - 3:15 pm

      you got it dude! you are correct @lame_dude

      Reply
    • kitty600 -  March 5, 2015 - 3:20 pm

      xd dude really lme dude

      Reply
    • Idiot Nah -  March 5, 2015 - 6:17 pm

      “Lame” is what imbeciles call an intellectual discovery or statement that they don’t understand. Don’t try to think to hard, mate. We understand that you don’t understand.

      Reply
    • Mr Happy -  March 5, 2015 - 6:20 pm

      It is further

      Reply
    • fghggjhgjhgjh -  March 5, 2015 - 6:54 pm

      boring

      Reply
      • Simply Steve -  March 10, 2015 - 7:28 am

        Not brave enough to cite your name while spewing nonsense like this, eh? You are a very illuminating person, especially about yourself.

        Reply
    • bae -  March 5, 2015 - 7:15 pm

      Wow do you.know any word other then lame and dude. Wow :$ ;D

      Reply
      • That Someone -  March 11, 2015 - 6:47 pm

        *than

        Reply
    • Crazy Larry -  March 6, 2015 - 4:45 am

      I think it’s fither,but that’s just because I’m crazy.

      Reply
    • kawaii (._.) -  March 6, 2015 - 4:50 am

      It isn’t lame. Your lame!!! Just like YOUR name!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      Reply
    • Turbo97 -  March 7, 2015 - 3:02 am

      This is the most boring thing ever.

      Reply
      • Turbo97 -  March 7, 2015 - 3:04 am

        Okay, I change my mind on what I said. I’m like Roald Dahl now!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

        Reply
    • Norman Arthur Fickett Jr. -  March 7, 2015 - 2:18 pm

      “it’s all lame”, can be if you don’t want to learn.

      Reply
    • awesome girl -  March 7, 2015 - 5:42 pm

      its not lame

      Reply
    • Zhu Mei Zoe -  March 7, 2015 - 5:58 pm

      So?Don’t say other people lame u are lame yourself !

      Reply
    • Yasmin -  March 7, 2015 - 11:10 pm

      lame

      Reply
      • Simply Steve -  March 10, 2015 - 7:30 am

        Then go somewhere else where people who never want to learn go.

        In the meantime, I’ll land the next job up for dibs because I avoided using the word “lame” to describe something I don’t understand and don’t want to understand.

        Reply
    • isy davis -  March 8, 2015 - 3:17 am

      why

      Reply
    • Bright Dude -  March 8, 2015 - 4:58 pm

      Lame is your brand new unused brain.

      Reply
    • someone -  March 9, 2015 - 1:05 pm

      Is it? I didn’t notice. Lol!

      Reply
  87. Trey Mulkey -  March 5, 2015 - 9:24 am

    It is farther if you are speaking as,”farther down the road,” but further is like saying,”further more”

    Reply
    • Bryan Mead -  March 5, 2015 - 10:54 am

      I agree, they have the same meaning, but they mean different things.

      Reply
    • megan -  March 5, 2015 - 12:48 pm

      U could say further down the road

      Reply
    • jackie chan -  March 7, 2015 - 10:35 am

      yurp

      Reply
    • Norman Arthur Fickett Jr. -  March 7, 2015 - 2:20 pm

      Yes, that’s how I would use those words.

      Reply
    • ROSHNI -  March 8, 2015 - 8:28 am

      FIRSTLY IT IS FURTHER DOWN THE ROAD…..SECONDLY THE SECOND ONE IS JUST PERFECT.

      Reply
      • Simply Steve -  March 10, 2015 - 7:32 am

        So what you’re saying is that “getting on the plane” is the same as “getting in the plane”?

        I mean, we use (or maybe misuse) that phrase all the time. It should mean the same thing, right. Well, I’ll be in the plane at 30000 feet while you can be on it. :-)

        Reply
    • uncle coconut -  March 8, 2015 - 2:08 pm

      if I go farther will I know further

      Reply
    • Maureen Gibbons -  March 8, 2015 - 6:49 pm

      My father went further into his explanation of the farthing than I ever would, but furthermore he had gone farther into England for a fruitless but frothy interview with Colin Firth. The farther you go into the woods the further you need to explore.

      Reply
    • IMBETTRTHANU -  March 9, 2015 - 5:29 am

      RITE

      Reply
  88. Tarebear -  March 5, 2015 - 7:17 am

    I will always speak the right thing now!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
    • Mommy -  March 5, 2015 - 5:49 pm

      stop spamming

      Reply
    • Crazy Larry -  March 6, 2015 - 4:48 am

      How do you speak the right ting all the time I always accidently speak in Spanish sometimes when I’m around my ape garry or my goldfish marry.

      Reply
    • Sophors -  March 6, 2015 - 6:24 am

      it is farther when I say goodbye to someone and further I far away from someone that we hardly often see together.

      Reply
    • Rose -  March 6, 2015 - 9:53 am

      I always have to look it up. I college course.

      Reply
    • Josh -  March 7, 2015 - 9:03 pm

      its so broken!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      Reply
      • summe -  April 17, 2015 - 8:55 pm

        !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!ASSHOLE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

        Reply
    • Jocool Ds -  March 8, 2015 - 1:11 am

      This road is going to be farther.

      Reply
    • Tarebear -  March 8, 2015 - 8:07 am

      !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      Reply
    • cool kid 69 -  March 8, 2015 - 2:24 pm

      you really like your dictionarys

      and speacking corectly

      Reply
    • poo -  March 8, 2015 - 6:43 pm

      You are annoying.

      Reply
  89. U. C. Broson -  March 5, 2015 - 2:08 am

    Further-more; it is no more farther by train than by bus.

    Reply
    • Nancy -  March 5, 2015 - 2:11 pm

      Isn’t the word ‘more’ redundant?

      Reply
    • Paula -  March 5, 2015 - 6:13 pm

      Furthermore is one word. No need for the hyphen.

      Reply
    • D Marini -  March 6, 2015 - 6:59 am

      is “more” really necessary when indicating that “no” farther? Wouldn’t it be implied by simply saying it is no farther?
      Not a criticism, rather a question.

      Reply
    • Merrily -  March 8, 2015 - 11:18 pm

      The only thing about what you said is that you don’t need to: “no more farther….” You can omit the word “more” and say: It is no farther by train….

      Reply
    • Kara -  March 9, 2015 - 1:13 pm

      Furthermore, it is no farther by train or by bus. ; is not needed unless you are combining sentences, furthermore doesn’t have a -, and more is not needed. Lol. JS since this is about grammar. ;)

      Reply
  90. Izzy -  March 4, 2015 - 11:11 pm

    hmmm interesting very interesting i love big words though pity they aren’t BIG

    Reply
    • Crazy Larry -  March 6, 2015 - 4:50 am

      Why do you ove big words I only love words that are in quantinese if there not in quantinese then I have trouble saying to speak the language.

      Reply
    • Alison -  March 9, 2015 - 3:09 am

      True, it is not BIG! But playing with them is still awesomely fun even though it’s small BIG! You get it?!

      Reply
  91. Claire -  March 4, 2015 - 7:02 pm

    I use them a lot both

    Reply
    • max -  March 8, 2015 - 10:41 am

      same hear

      Reply
    • Kaleigh -  March 8, 2015 - 11:30 pm

      … its “i use them both a lot.”
      constructive criticism. just stating.

      Reply
    • jack -  March 9, 2015 - 9:14 am

      sholywallybingbang

      Reply
  92. Bubba Dabeesh -  March 4, 2015 - 6:05 pm

    I pick further!

    Reply
    • Kaleigh -  March 8, 2015 - 11:29 pm

      it isnt a matter of picking.. its a matter of proper grammar.

      Reply
  93. www -  March 4, 2015 - 1:53 pm

    yeah people

    Reply
  94. Emman Okon -  March 3, 2015 - 2:16 pm

    Indeed,learners digest!

    Reply
    • lol -  March 4, 2015 - 2:43 pm

      haha

      Reply
      • ???? -  March 5, 2015 - 2:59 pm

        You should clam down!

        Reply
    • jimmy -  March 4, 2015 - 7:09 pm

      INDEEED EMMAN OKONNNN

      Reply
    • ???? -  March 5, 2015 - 2:59 pm

      Ok :)

      Reply
  95. Tinkies -  March 3, 2015 - 4:39 am

    I found the 2 words very confusing- thank you so much for the clarity…….think this site rocks!

    Reply
    • Bubba Dabeesh -  March 4, 2015 - 6:04 pm

      I think you should pick the word further!

      Reply
      • Joanne -  March 5, 2015 - 6:05 pm

        I agree with you

        Reply
      • brain? -  March 6, 2015 - 10:30 pm

        You don’t just PICK one. If you went on this post it was to find out the difference so you can use them properly and not just pick whichever one you want. There is a difference you know!

        Reply
      • Simply Steve -  March 10, 2015 - 7:37 am

        OK, if you pick further for both, I’ll pick “on” for meaning both “in” and “on” when I say “I’m getting on the plane to fly to Chicago.”

        I mean, I can select any word I want and it’ll mean what I say it does, right?

        Reply
    • kitty600 -  March 5, 2015 - 3:21 pm

      eh does it matter

      Reply
  96. Daniel -  March 2, 2015 - 11:36 am

    It have been disturbing me also. Thank you

    Reply
    • Poop -  March 4, 2015 - 2:40 pm

      Like you

      Reply
  97. Rosemary -  March 1, 2015 - 10:24 am

    Farther should be used as”he is farther down the street” and further should be used as” further more”.

    Reply
    • Suzanne Collins -  March 2, 2015 - 6:14 pm

      of course

      Reply
      • Claire -  March 4, 2015 - 7:00 pm

        I use them both

        Reply
      • zeus murphy -  March 4, 2015 - 7:06 pm

        I belive that is correct. How about to, two, and too. tricky ;D

        Reply
        • Aztec -  March 8, 2015 - 5:51 pm

          Two is a number, to implies you are going somewhere, and too includes something :3

          Reply
        • someone -  March 9, 2015 - 1:07 pm

          Lol, very tricky indeed!

          Reply
        • Kara -  March 9, 2015 - 1:17 pm

          To, too and two are easy. Lol so is their they’re and there.

          Reply
      • hihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihi -  March 5, 2015 - 9:35 am

        hihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihih
        definitely further

        Reply
        • hihihihihihihihihihihihihihi -  March 7, 2015 - 3:20 pm

          hihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihhihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihhihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihhihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihhihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihhihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihhihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihhihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihhihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihhihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihhihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihhihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihhihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihhihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihhihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihhihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihhihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihhihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihih

          Reply
          • hihihihihihihihi -  March 10, 2015 - 2:00 pm

            hihihihihihihihihihiihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihihi

        • bill -  March 9, 2015 - 4:13 am

          no dry

          Reply
          • you -  March 9, 2015 - 9:03 pm

            woa

    • ally -  March 4, 2015 - 4:05 pm

      I know right i have been wondering that

      Reply
    • Jeree -  March 8, 2015 - 4:03 pm

      “Furthermore,” not “further more.”

      Reply
    • Emily -  March 9, 2015 - 11:44 am

      OMG congrats you said the same thing as everyone else.

      Reply
  98. Garba Ahmad -  February 28, 2015 - 1:01 pm

    Nice song…

    Reply
  99. eric -  February 27, 2015 - 8:18 pm

    It’s very educational. I found the two words very confusing until I read ‘em somewhere.

    Thanks. Love it

    Reply
  100. David Lee -  February 27, 2015 - 11:29 am

    Can we say, “He went further down that road.” Of course — but in this case “further” changes the “road” from a physical object to a train of thought.

    Reply
    • Charm -  March 5, 2015 - 6:55 am

      Right on!

      Reply
  101. David Lee -  February 27, 2015 - 11:17 am

    Simple test: Which word can have the extension of “more” added to it?
    Furthermore. Indicating more thought to come. Thus, clearly “farther” must indicate physical distance.

    Reply
    • Summer Karpan -  March 4, 2015 - 4:49 pm

      It’s f a r t h e r

      Reply
  102. Venkateshwarlu shivanoori -  February 26, 2015 - 10:43 pm

    There is a an enormous difference in meaning between the two words. One cannot expectg better understanding than the present generation teaching at School and College Levels as the Tutor him/herself cannot distinguish to explain the pupil.

    Reply
  103. Uh -  February 26, 2015 - 5:30 pm

    Cool beans.

    Reply
  104. Alberto -  February 26, 2015 - 4:28 pm

    Darlene, on this website farther is an adverb. But, ex. 1 & 2 conflicts with the meaning that was given between farther & further. Though they’re interchangeable the two ex.confused me a little.

    Reply
  105. Samuel Amatoury -  February 26, 2015 - 3:40 pm

    Simply EDUCATIONAL in every sense of the word. Love it
    Thank you

    Reply
  106. darlene -  February 26, 2015 - 1:37 pm

    so you say farther has no verb sense, but is it not an adverb? if not, what is it?

    Reply
    • Debby Sisco -  February 26, 2015 - 3:28 pm

      An adverb is not a verb, any more than an adjective is a noun.

      Reply
      • Kara -  March 9, 2015 - 1:23 pm

        However a word can be used in different tenses. Lol

        Reply
    • Corey -  March 4, 2015 - 1:28 pm

      It is an adverb

      Reply
  107. Arkady Polishchuk -  February 26, 2015 - 12:24 pm

    I love it

    Reply
  108. Natalie I. Giroux -  February 26, 2015 - 11:43 am

    I love this information, it either confirms my knowledge of language or upgrades it. Thank you

    This is one website that everyone ought to access and frequent. Maybe then our society would have a better and more intelligent vocabulary. The current, especially many of our teenagers and adults, whose verbal communication is abhorrent and strewn with foul language. Is this the fault of our schools, do they not teach/learn the value of lexicon as an absolute and vital necessity in life.

    Reply
    • Matt Knighton -  February 26, 2015 - 1:22 pm

      Totally love this. Agreed: it either confirms what I thought but didn’t actually KNOW, or it gets me moving on the right track. It’s a great app!

      Reply
    • Sam Devine -  March 1, 2015 - 7:47 pm

      Schools play a large part in children’s lives but most children spend more time with their family than at school. Family has the biggest influence on children. It is to family we must first look if a child’s language is under developed.

      Reply
      • poop -  March 4, 2015 - 5:52 pm

        wat

        Reply
      • Stacey Cicchiello -  March 8, 2015 - 2:07 pm

        Natalie I. Giroux and Sam Devine~

        I couldn’t agree more! While school DOES hugely mold and shape our little one’s minds, personalities, and even their physical appearance, the responsibility truly does fall on us back at the home front. That is where the learning starts, and more importantly, that is where parents and other family members can build on the things they learn at school, both academically and morally. Much of that seems to be getting lost somehow. Maybe it’s because more and more families are forced to rely on others to raise their kids due to extended work schedules and such? Oh boy, I could get started on way more of an issue than just vocabulary here. I had better close it up… “MY” point is simple. Our young ones ARE declining in their use of speech, that is a fact, and I believe that it is not an “either-or” here when asking who is at fault for this. Vocabulary, I believe is built not only through reading, but through communication…talking. So much of this is lost to us these days, both in the classroom AND at home. Teachers are relying more on cookie cutter worksheets and families are all looking down at our phones. TEXTING and e-mails are taking the place of conversations, inflection is out… and slang is in!

        Reply
        • Frank Casale -  April 29, 2015 - 6:45 am

          Stacey, I agree with you one-hundred percent! As an adult, I feel that we either have to accept it or get left behind!
          Let me be clear, not all progress is for the better!
          From an adult standpoint, it seems to me that for every three steps we take in advancement, we lose two steps.
          Like yourself, I could discuss at length, what is or is not being taught to today’s young people.
          Unfortunately, a person would have to write a treatise.

          Reply
      • bawesomebj02 -  March 9, 2015 - 9:23 am

        Lol, your all debating when you can just say it like you want. XD

        Reply
        • bawesomebj02 -  March 9, 2015 - 9:26 am

          But as it would always end, there is a right way but it depends on the contents of what your sentence is and all of its parts, therefore i will state that it depends on your sentence to decide which one it is.

          Reply
  109. Farhad Akrami -  February 26, 2015 - 11:33 am

    Thanks for your helpful information. I love Word Facts!

    Reply
  110. Ricky Forguson -  February 26, 2015 - 11:12 am

    Excellent explanation…..obvious to even the most casual observer! It’s disgusting that “popular” usage seems to trump “proper” usage these days. Just tune in to the TV show “American Pickers” for just 5 minutes, and you will hear what passes for mainstream grammar: “Me and Mike was pickin’ through this barn and you won’t believe what we seen!”……..(I’ll bet it wasn’t an English grammar textbook!!!)

    Reply
    • Susan Miller -  March 2, 2015 - 1:57 pm

      You can be sure it wasn’t any kind of grammar book – your choice of TV programs for grammatical incorrectness was spot on. Personally, I have rarely heard worse grammar than on that particular program except for that heard on the streets of St. Thomas. American Pickers is, however, not the only TV program that seems to espouse bad grammar; even some of the news programs are guilty of many of the same mistakes. Bad grammar is a widespread occurrence.

      Reply
      • kate anderson -  March 8, 2015 - 4:14 am

        ahhh i now understand which one to use and it will be much easyer to say things now :]

        LOVE THIS SITE!!!

        Reply
  111. Joe Boyle -  February 26, 2015 - 11:03 am

    Father was a featherweight
    Mother was a load
    Further, Father found a match
    Farther down the road

    Reply
    • ellipsis... -  February 26, 2015 - 4:27 pm

      Love it !

      Reply
    • TBoNE -  February 26, 2015 - 7:53 pm

      Love it!

      Reply
    • Garba Ahmad -  February 28, 2015 - 12:59 pm

      Nice song…

      Reply
    • p.trout -  March 1, 2015 - 4:30 am

      EXCELLENT!

      Reply
    • CJ -  March 12, 2015 - 11:41 am

      “If her sister calls you brutha, you better get furtha” – Louis Jordan

      Reply
  112. mark -  February 26, 2015 - 10:49 am

    Far out

    Reply
  113. Andres Rieloff -  February 26, 2015 - 10:40 am

    Simpler. FARTHER IS PHYSICAL DISTANCE.
    FURTHER IS MENTAL DISTANCE.

    Reply
    • Pull it back Ms. -  March 8, 2015 - 10:14 am

      I THINK YOU’RE MENTAL

      Reply
      • Frank Casale -  April 30, 2015 - 6:20 am

        I THINK ANDRES IS RIGHT!

        Reply
  114. MBG -  February 26, 2015 - 10:34 am

    …and furthermore, ok.

    Reply
  115. Barbara -  February 26, 2015 - 10:34 am

    Please describe the correct usage of the word “myself”.

    Reply
  116. Salahud Din Ahmed -  February 26, 2015 - 1:30 am

    Pretty smart & cordial. It did further, yes.

    Salahud Din
    English News Presenter
    Bangladesh Television

    Reply
  117. Valarie -  February 26, 2015 - 1:27 am

    I will no further use these words incorrectly. This will take me farther in speaking and writing. ;)

    Reply
    • Sharkisha -  March 3, 2015 - 11:11 am

      GIRL HUSH!

      Reply
  118. The_Fore_Runner -  February 25, 2015 - 4:33 pm

    Of course it has. I intend to further my study of ambiguous English terms on Thesaurus.com. Thanks a million.

    Reply
    • Charles Jeffrey -  March 5, 2015 - 3:02 am

      Schools could do a better job teaching grammar. I suspect too many teachers are themselves unschooled in it. Furthermore, I need a synonym for thesaurus.

      Reply
      • E -  March 5, 2015 - 5:29 pm

        Food

        Reply
  119. Jon Woods -  February 25, 2015 - 1:57 pm

    The farther/further discussion always reminds me of this:

    Frank: Anything further, Father?

    Wagstaff: Anything further, Father? That can’t be right. Isn’t it ‘Anything Father, further?’

    - Horse Feathers (1932)

    Reply
    • robin -  March 6, 2015 - 4:43 pm

      its futher farther is not a word i read dictionarys for fun

      Reply
      • lava -  March 9, 2015 - 3:52 pm

        what

        Reply
      • Simply Steve -  March 10, 2015 - 7:51 am

        Really? Farther is not a word?!? Yet you claim to read “dictionarys” for fun?

        First, it’s spelled “dictionaries.”

        Second, http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/farther if you don’t trust this site to state what is a word and what is not.

        It even explains that further and farther are diverging in usage even more than they are now.

        Third, taking your precedent, I hereby declare that “lame” is not a word.

        Reply
      • Simply Steve -  March 10, 2015 - 9:03 am

        Oh! Learn how to use punctuation as well, please.

        Reply

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