Dictionary.com

Why “bluster” is our 2012 Word of the Year

You may recall that last year we selected a rare word, a tongue-twister of sorts, as the 2011 Word of the Year: tergiversate which means “to change repeatedly one’s attitude or opinions with respect to a cause, subject, etc.; equivocate.” Rather than pick a word that rose to prominence through common usage during the year (like Occupy or Arab Spring), we selected a word hidden in the dictionary that encapsulated an overall quality of 2011.

Now, what of 2012? To be frank, this year has been lexicographically quiet. There were no Arab Springs or Occupies, and few unusual words took on new or heightened meanings because of contemporary events. Where were the tebowing and pinking of 2012? Perhaps we were too distracted by serious political events to go around making up words. Surprisingly, the campaigns themselves weren’t fodder for prickly neologisms either.

2012 saw the most expensive political campaigns and some of the most extreme weather events in human history, from floods in Australia to cyclones in China to Hurricane Sandy and many others. Man-made disasters spiraled as the European Central Bank continued to hem and haw over bailouts and austerity, and Greeks went to the polls after years of uncertainty. Even after many spilled words, the stability of the Euro fuels debate around the world. So what one word conveys these dominant trends of 2012? Bluster.

In Old English “bluster” meant “to wander or stray,” and today it has a few, closely related meanings. It means both “to roar and be tumultuous, as wind” and “noisy, empty threats or protests; inflated talk.” 2012 was full of bluster from the skies and from the mouths of pundits. As the US Congress faces the looming fiscal cliff, we can only anticipate more bluster from politicians. Hopefully, the bluster will only come from them, not from more nor’easters and early winter storms.

Even without new coinages English is such a ripe and fertile language that we didn’t need to look far for a word to sum up this year. We believe that the act of finding a perfect word when searching for meaning can help one overcome challenges of all kinds, natural, political, or otherwise because no problem can be solved until it is articulated. We hope Dictionary.com can continue to serve as an aid against confusion for years to come.

Popular References-

“It’s all part of the election season’s bluster cycle, and while partisan hot air is typical this time of year, this year’s squabbling has been “palpably ugly,” even if most of it is just talk…”

Election Season Bluster,” by Elliot C. McLaughlin, CNN Politics

“Greece may be a small economy, but a Greek departure from the euro, amid brinkmanship and bluster, would not be a small event.”

The Greek Run,” The Economist

“Something of the typical Republican bluster was on display from our commander-in-chief — not egregiously so, but it was there.”

Exceptional Nations Don’t Need Bluster,” by Carla Seaquist, Huffington Post

“So this is an odd time to be making confrontations over China’s currency a centerpiece of your economic policy — unless, of course, it’s just bluster aimed at making voters think you’re tough.”

An Issue Whose Time Has Passed,” by Paul Krugman, The New York Times (Blog), 10/22/2012

126 Comments

  1. buy-skinny-fiber.com -  February 12, 2014 - 7:52 pm

    I usually do not leave a response, however I read a
    few of the responses on this page Dictionary.com’s 2012 Word of the Year:
    Bluster | Dictionary.com Blog. I do have some questions for you if it’s okay.
    Is it only me or do some of the responses come across like they are left by
    brain dead visitors? :-P And, if you are posting on additional sites, I would like to keep up with anything new you have to post.

    Could you make a list of every one of all your social community pages like your
    twitter feed, Facebook page or linkedin profile?

    Reply
  2. nancy -  December 3, 2013 - 12:19 pm

    The retractable irony behind the logic of eventual boomerangs of convuluded dianamics, leaves fundamental chartered territorial edges non- conforming-and questionable.

    Reply
  3. Darrell Osborne -  December 3, 2013 - 12:06 pm

    I think the word of the year for 2013 should be pugnacious. I think that word above all others sum up how a great deal if politicians have acted like the whole year long. I like reading others suggestions on here,but I think my suggestion will win out. Thanks!!!

    Reply
  4. villas for rent in st lucia -  November 14, 2013 - 5:07 am

    There’s certainly a great deal to know about this topic.

    I love all of the points you have made.

    Reply
  5. ejekeje -  October 19, 2013 - 4:27 pm

    BLUSTER!!!!!!

    Reply
  6. powersj48@gmail.com -  December 27, 2012 - 8:25 am

    I wonder if this cluster of events would be a bluster? Or the conundrum set asunder is a fundamental blunder? That humdrum of a tundra was the biggest block-buster? The fluster of frustration lacked a luster we could muster.

    Reply
  7. Cella -  December 18, 2012 - 8:19 pm

    BLOOODBOOOOOOSTBLUUUUUUUNDERBLUUUUUUUSTER

    Reply
  8. Toad | michelledevilliersartandstories -  December 18, 2012 - 8:27 am

    [...] year on Dictionary.com, because of the year’s tumultuous contemporary events. (See article Dictionary.com) It has now, instead of being happily, snugly, linked in my mind with Winnie the Pooh, been dragged [...]

    Reply
  9. Merk -  December 16, 2012 - 3:59 am

    I am so tired of the link from dictionary.com

    We have been referred to the ‘bluster’ article for what seems like a month now. Are you going to continue it until 2013. Please can’t we get a new link at least once-a-week?

    Reply
  10. Sammislam -  December 14, 2012 - 1:33 pm

    BLUSTER; a fine word & one which describes the meaning of many an event this year. Good choose-in’. I Must say, would also make a great name for a few dogs I’ve known.

    Reply
  11. svenjamin -  December 14, 2012 - 9:36 am

    I am still surprised the word wasn’t ‘prevarication’ in honor of Mitt Romney!

    Reply
  12. AWAD/PEOPLE | BLOGCHI@mayopia.com -  December 14, 2012 - 5:55 am

    [...] on the outs — ‘Whippersnapper’ attitude — ‘Curmudgeon’ Bluster Shouts. — ‘Malingerer’ declining — ‘Nincompoop’ or Fox — [...]

    Reply
  13. JJRousseau -  December 12, 2012 - 7:41 am

    Mayans taking noted when the INCAS failed to muster — Bark a Lounging voted yet the fiscal cliff fracked cluster — Merry Christmas one and all — Oui Oui quietly with luster — On the corner — against the wall. — So much for the bluster.

    Reply
  14. eli -  December 10, 2012 - 3:01 pm

    Word are soooo wonderful. The world BLUSTER puts a smile on my face.
    Well done!!!

    Reply
  15. Bubba -  December 10, 2012 - 12:23 pm

    RE: id_rather_be_ a_ jedi Dec.6 -
    You mean you can OWN a definition? Wowza! Is that copyright or is it copyrot? I guess that to ‘Coin a Phrase” stems from the law that says you can charge other people money for using your copy wrong. wRight?…

    Reply
  16. Bubba -  December 10, 2012 - 12:05 pm

    Bluster has lost its luster. This ‘Hot Word’ is as cold as last weeks toast and as stale as yesterdays beer. We’ve been looking at this choice item of etimology waaay to long. I suggest changing ‘Hot Word’ at least as often as you would change your socks! (ahem) or are we going to endure until the end of 2012?

    Reply
  17. hazar -  December 8, 2012 - 5:37 am

    Realy this word definitely describes what has happened in the last year.

    Reply
  18. Annette -  December 7, 2012 - 11:15 pm

    I’m disappointed. Bluster happens every year, increasing every year. It’s nothing unique to this year.

    Reply
  19. Val -  December 7, 2012 - 12:10 pm

    Meh. This sounds like an inaccurate and pessimistic view of the year… I doubt a significant amount of effort was put into choosing a proper word. Although the politics and weather might have been tiring, there have been many advances in science, technology, literature, music, and world unity this year that are not to be overlooked. There is no reason to lock oneself into the bad of the year instead of thinking about what we have and have gained, and how much there is to be thankful for. The word ‘Bluster’ is ordinary, drab, and uninspired. I hope this was not worked too intensely on, because if this is really the best you can do after a long process…

    Reply
  20. Tim -  December 7, 2012 - 7:32 am

    The key to eloquence is being understood. In most cases, the more common word is the best one to use. I applaud your choice for this year’s word. Its simplicity leaves the message apparent without clouding the issue with the need for an extended definition. Well-played and quite apt.

    Reply
  21. i'd_rather_be_a_jedi -  December 6, 2012 - 3:03 pm

    I think it’s a rather childish word to describe a narrow-minded view of immature topics. Politics? Really? THAT is what you choose to focus on in order to define our whole YEAR?! Why not something based on the positives? It’s not that I don’t think politicians were NOT full of bluster and hot air this year, but it’s just so… depressing! I would personally choose a word meaning “boring”… like: “uninteresting, tedious, dull, dreary, mind-numbing, tiresome, lackluster, unexciting, monotonous, repetitive, wearisome, humdrum, uninspiring” to describe this choice of word!!!

    What about “unify” or a synonym:
    “unite, join, amalgamate, merge, combine, coalesce, fuse, bring together”

    America has been through a lot, and witnessed other countries go through a lot this year. We have learned unity. Not “bluster”. While it defines our political climate, it fails to define what we have been through together as a nation over the course of the year.

    All definitions property of Encarta ® World English Dictionary © & (P) 1998-2005 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

    Reply
  22. del-einstein -  December 6, 2012 - 1:45 pm

    ..great word, absolute and precise proof..keep it up! :)

    Reply
  23. sheen -  December 5, 2012 - 11:34 pm

    Good word
    I like it…

    Reply
  24. Paul Gaudet -  December 5, 2012 - 2:35 pm

    I love the sound of the word, but it seems a tad innocuous for some of the severe weather that was experienced not to mention the outrageous tone of much of the political rhetoric over the last year.

    Reply
  25. Chevie -  December 3, 2012 - 1:47 am

    Great! :)

    Reply
  26. Deji Ogundimu -  December 1, 2012 - 2:01 am

    What a an elegantly simple and noble word for the year .

    So conspicuously hidden all through the year.

    Reply
  27. malathy devanathan -  November 30, 2012 - 9:59 pm

    unable to bear the politicians’ bluster,nature too is blustering.

    Reply
  28. ellis -  November 30, 2012 - 2:39 pm

    what a blustery day— Winnie the Pooh! hmmmm.

    Reply
  29. gino -  November 30, 2012 - 11:54 am

    REVOLTING That should have been the word!
    Constrained nations REVOLTING against tyranny.
    The US supreme court ruling on a case that they admitted on the first day that they could not hear…revolting!
    Election fraud ….revolting!
    Government theft by overspending….REVOLTING!

    Reply
  30. WC Murray -  November 30, 2012 - 6:14 am

    The perfect choice for 2012 !

    Reply
  31. Mogs -  November 29, 2012 - 7:57 pm

    Nice word but seriously, you guys are a “dictionary” site. I had never heard of the lasts year wod but I heard of bluster when I first read Winnie the pooh. Sums up the crazy year though

    Reply
  32. Greg Coker -  November 29, 2012 - 9:31 am

    Nice word. I likey it!

    Reply
  33. [...] Dictionary.com chose bluster, in a nod to presidential politics, the never-ending euro crisis, and extreme weather such as Hurricane Sandy. (Can you name the second-worst Atlantic hurricane of the season? Isaac). Dictionary.com admitted that 2012 “has been lexicographically quiet. There were no Arab Springs or Occupies…” It did not disclose its shortlist. Bastards. This entry was posted in Word News and tagged Eurogeddon, Grexit, Hurricane, Lance Armstrong, Word of the Year on November 14, 2012 by wordwonk. [...]

    Reply
  34. LIfe -  November 27, 2012 - 9:37 am

    BLUSTER. I like the word.

    Reply
  35. London -  November 27, 2012 - 2:58 am

    With the hot air our politicians produce, bluster is the perfect word of the year.

    Reply
  36. themodelkid -  November 27, 2012 - 2:37 am

    I regret winding up here. Why did I take my eye off the word I looked up?

    Reply
  37. bettty -  November 26, 2012 - 4:14 pm

    I like the word, and in fact used it last night when watching the ‘Grey Cup’ football game. I said to my friend that the Calgary players came out when they were named full of ‘bluster’, but that Toronto was leaving their testosterone for the field. So, yes, I like the word bluster. Treat Choice. Thanks, Betty

    Reply
  38. James -  November 26, 2012 - 6:46 am

    Please correct the spelling of Ms. Seaquist’s name.

    Reply
  39. hayu abdala -  November 26, 2012 - 5:24 am

    twitter

    Reply
  40. Rampalli Sarma -  November 26, 2012 - 5:04 am

    Good that you announced the word in November itself; else, I would have thought you’re just blustering.

    Reply
  41. Meizi -  November 26, 2012 - 12:26 am

    I think it is a very special word bringing this year into perspective.

    Reply
  42. Benny -  November 25, 2012 - 4:10 pm

    I’ve loved this word since I heard it on Winnie the Pooh when I was little (“Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day”). You hear it so rarely in serious conversation that for a long time I thought it was made up by AA Milne or that it was Brit-speak.

    Reply
  43. pistol pete -  November 25, 2012 - 1:58 pm

    Toby, the year has not gone by quick, it has gone by quickly. Senor Jose, the game is not a foot, the game is afoot.

    Reply
  44. frazi -  November 25, 2012 - 11:25 am

    nice

    Reply
  45. alaina -  November 25, 2012 - 8:54 am

    cool word

    Reply
  46. Imi -  November 25, 2012 - 7:07 am

    A nostalgic comment from the peanut gallery! I like it.
    Yeah – Bluster sums it up – even for us up here in Canada. Lots of political hot air cutting through the biting arctic winds, and still the heating costs keep rising.

    Reply
  47. FCS -  November 25, 2012 - 12:45 am

    Bluster – will use it today in my class – Blustering should not be part of my presentation, less it is intended to inspire.

    Reply
  48. Leah -  November 24, 2012 - 11:02 pm

    I missed *lifes (difficulties).

    Also, I very much so like Susans statement. Well, I like her side.

    Reply
  49. Leah -  November 24, 2012 - 10:58 pm

    I like this more – ‘No problem can be solved until it is articulated.’

    Although, I do find the statement slightly bias and would not cite it as a reference to solve all difficulties, it does have an appealing tone to it.

    Reply
  50. Joy -  November 24, 2012 - 10:27 pm

    Nice word choice. Very impressed!

    Reply
  51. Jamespie -  November 24, 2012 - 10:25 pm

    wow awesome information details
    we have totally satisfied from ur details so keep it up for updating

    we are regularly check more information updation from this site :)

    thanks u

    Reply
  52. Olalekan Sam -  November 24, 2012 - 8:58 pm

    Cogent, consice, simple and straight forward.

    Reply
  53. mary -  November 24, 2012 - 1:25 pm

    hey i like it too

    Reply
  54. Jane -  November 24, 2012 - 12:31 pm

    Bluster is a fine word indeed for all the upheavals of the year, but I agree with Sarah Lear, in an Olympic year a more uplifting word representing the extraordinary achievements of athletes, coaches and London itself might have been more inspiring. Can anyone suggest one?

    Reply
  55. Bonnie -  November 24, 2012 - 8:53 am

    Well, let’s get the process started for 2013. How about fisliff for the word for next year? I am already tired of hearing about it, the worst is yet to come, and we will undoubtedly know the consequences of it before this year is over. However, it’s significance will linger, leaving a bad taste in your mouth, like cheap wine.

    Reply
  56. Glen -  November 24, 2012 - 5:12 am

    pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis

    Reply
  57. unknown -  November 24, 2012 - 1:24 am

    xry

    Reply
  58. Laura Phipps -  November 23, 2012 - 12:46 pm

    Indeed!

    Reply
  59. Lily -  November 23, 2012 - 11:39 am

    The president has blustered about without doing anything except take away our freedom… I hope that is not the 2016 word as well.

    Reply
  60. PATERRE | BLOGCHI@mayopia.com -  November 23, 2012 - 5:31 am

    [...] idiocy is Free. — Though as always Pricing is apparent to the Children of today. — The Bluster always seems to find a way. — ‘Thanksgiving Tetris’  is the All American Dream: [...]

    Reply
  61. bgy -  November 23, 2012 - 3:50 am

    Too common to impress me.

    Reply
  62. Trisha -  November 23, 2012 - 3:00 am

    Sandy’s combined wraths that here was not a little affair, gave us the neologism, “Frankenstorm.” But possibly before 2013, the Gen. Petreus’ storm will give us a new word for “ce n’est pas une petite affaire.”

    Reply
  63. truthdig -  November 23, 2012 - 2:07 am

    c’mon, dictionary.com.. just admit that the bluster was entirely the republicans, as it always is, and not the dems. choose a side, never be an annoying fence-sitter. the republicans are blustering again with the coinage “fiscal cliff”; it’s not a cliff at all or necessarily damaging to our economy. just more fear-mongering, or shall we say blustering, from the GOP. They lost the election in an electoral landslide, but that won’t shut up their.. bluster.

    Reply
  64. tiffanydw2 -  November 23, 2012 - 1:54 am

    you just tripled my IQ! now the world makes sense. wait a minute… ?

    Reply
  65. rohan -  November 22, 2012 - 10:59 pm

    ROHAN

    ROHAN

    ROHAN

    ROHAN

    ROHAN

    ROHAN

    ROHAN

    ROHAN

    ROHAN

    ROHAN

    Reply
  66. Chale Meg Jior -  November 22, 2012 - 4:45 pm

    cool word. . .but has negative meaning. . heheh

    Reply
  67. Samairah aggarwal -  November 22, 2012 - 7:38 am

    Sums up my feelings on this year aptly.Sometimes the simplest of words are the most hard-hitting. Great job!

    Reply
  68. bradley -  November 22, 2012 - 6:52 am

    Nice one.

    Reply
  69. ed scott -  November 22, 2012 - 6:37 am

    Bluster – yes I believe that about covers 2012.

    Reply
  70. IDUNNO -  November 21, 2012 - 10:13 pm

    i TOTALY LIK IT. ITS LIK TOTOALLY aMASING

    Reply
  71. TETO -  November 21, 2012 - 5:46 pm

    I elect “DON’T”……..
    it applies to most situations, people, politicians, weather, ideas, music, and barking dogs.
    Try it on for size DON’T.

    Reply
  72. Crackers Mcgee -  November 21, 2012 - 12:24 pm

    “noisy, empty threats or protests; inflated talk.”

    Sounds like the Occupy movement.

    Reply
  73. Huge Nerd -  November 21, 2012 - 12:18 pm

    Fantastic!! My mind is blown guys!

    Reply
  74. svenjamin -  November 21, 2012 - 10:05 am

    meh

    Reply
  75. yd -  November 21, 2012 - 7:25 am

    Ob! a real bluster indeed please pardon for my mistake 24 Nov ha ha ha

    Reply
  76. yd -  November 21, 2012 - 7:22 am

    I like the word “bluster”. On 24 June it would be a phenomenal bluster of a kind in Bangkok.

    Reply
  77. Brooke Kane -  November 21, 2012 - 7:21 am

    Best choice ever. Epitomizes the election and the entire year perfectly. Congratulations! Dictionary.com has outdone itself.

    Reply
  78. BLUSTER | BLOGCHI@mayopia.com -  November 21, 2012 - 5:58 am

    [...] food Spoiled by another Major Major Cluster. — Priorities lost with all the overlapping  ‘Bluster’. –   Sonny Williams  wears a trench coat not a Duster.  — Wazat mean? — [...]

    Reply
  79. Silly1 -  November 21, 2012 - 2:36 am

    Good choice, but I found the reasoning a little BLUSTERy.

    Reply
  80. Mary -  November 21, 2012 - 1:17 am

    Winnie the Pooh and The Blustery Day!

    Reply
  81. roseller tan -  November 21, 2012 - 12:34 am

    amazinnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnng!word in the year of 2012

    Reply
  82. CleanFun -  November 20, 2012 - 10:11 pm

    Bluster doesn’t exactly roll of the tongue. I half expect a vulgar profanity to directly follow it.

    Insidious would have been my choice.

    Reply
  83. lary -  November 20, 2012 - 5:51 pm

    Bluster in my humble opinion does not cover all the bases concerning this years events including the good the bad and the ugly or this that and the other, i also as many of you may remember the old saying sticks and stones may break my bones but words shall never hurt me. Anyway think about GAMUT i think it applies.

    Reply
  84. Victor -  November 20, 2012 - 12:55 pm

    Should’a been “superstorm.”

    Reply
  85. kewlkiwi -  November 20, 2012 - 11:55 am

    @Sarah Lear
    Is that the ‘Royal We’ Sarah?

    Reply
  86. Nobody -  November 20, 2012 - 10:45 am

    I think it’s perfect.

    Reply
  87. Dawn Marie -  November 20, 2012 - 10:44 am

    Wow, so many negative Nellies :) I like reading these comments but the ones that are rude… not so much. What a bluster! LOL I won’t get that out of my head all day hahaha BLUSTER, I LIKE IT

    Reply
  88. Enjay -  November 20, 2012 - 10:20 am

    I like it. A lot!

    Reply
  89. JohnnCon -  November 20, 2012 - 10:18 am

    Phineas T. Bluster – for us Howdy Doody fans.

    Reply
  90. Obliter8 -  November 20, 2012 - 10:12 am

    I think it’s fantastic that a word such as this, so simple and yet so beautiful, grabs all the woes of the world and describes everything that has happened in one instant, is 2012′s word.

    Reply
  91. Yenn -  November 20, 2012 - 10:02 am

    The real word should be Blasphemous, describes most countries now-a-days as “y’all” like to say

    Reply
  92. Yenn -  November 20, 2012 - 10:00 am

    Yes, 2012 is not over yet, nor has 2013 began. Many car companies had introduced their 2013 models in mid October.

    Reply
  93. A Year Full of Bluster | Wordability -  November 20, 2012 - 9:52 am

    [...] The reasons for the selection are cogent – it has been a year of political bluster across the globe and meteorological bluster from the skies. So it is a neat word which ties together the controllable and uncontrollable elements of the last 12 months. [...]

    Reply
  94. bholland -  November 20, 2012 - 7:53 am

    I approve your choice – well done.

    Reply
  95. Susan -  November 20, 2012 - 7:47 am

    Perfect! What better word for the proliferation of uninformed nonsense on social media and the web?

    Reply
  96. bob -  November 20, 2012 - 7:45 am

    Antidisestablishmentarianism

    Reply
  97. Liz -  November 20, 2012 - 6:56 am

    Not a very inspired choice. Very blah, doesn’t conjure up much imagery and I don’t see why it couldn’t apply to any other year.

    You should have taken user submissions and I think you’d found much more applicable words for 2012.

    Reply
  98. john -  November 20, 2012 - 6:17 am

    Senor Jose, the game is still a foot? Are you referring to the appendage on which we balance, or the measurement equal to 12 inches?
    Perhaps you meant “afoot”.

    Reply
  99. Mirabella -  November 20, 2012 - 5:12 am

    I agree. There was too much bluster this year, and it certainly epitomizes the political campaigns and the actions (or lack thereof) of congress!

    Reply
  100. Cupcake Queen -  November 20, 2012 - 5:08 am

    WOW. So, so true!!!! Bluster has really described our year perfectly. Though I still believe “duodecimal” would fit it well, too, meaning “twelve”!

    Reply
  101. blusterbill -  November 20, 2012 - 4:04 am

    Everyone is filled with bluster – it just needs to be primed and fired.

    Reply
  102. Aw Hirsi -  November 20, 2012 - 3:57 am

    You guys are now at it. You are blustering.

    Reply
  103. Param -  November 20, 2012 - 2:42 am

    EPIC

    Reply
  104. Mpgod -  November 20, 2012 - 2:16 am

    A good word choice, I might say. Clearly describes 2012.

    BLUSTER

    Reply
  105. Sam -  November 20, 2012 - 2:15 am

    So meaningful! :D

    Reply
  106. Sarah Lear -  November 20, 2012 - 1:22 am

    We are not sure that ‘bluster’ is the greatest word for this year seeing that we have had many successful events including the Olympics in London.

    Reply
  107. shubi -  November 19, 2012 - 10:49 pm

    lovely word! love it!

    Reply
  108. reiley -  November 19, 2012 - 9:20 pm

    i agree. nice word,

    (awwwwwwwwwwwwwww c’mon, i wish minecraft was a word!!!!)

    Reply
  109. Zan the Bhe -  November 19, 2012 - 8:52 pm

    That’s September. Blustery.

    Reply
  110. callmeanything:) -  November 19, 2012 - 7:08 pm

    Good word! (Excuse the R.I.P. word) Great how you used several different sources for the idea, and are using the word to cover several areas of the year.

    I’ve never commented on anything this early! Wow. Of course, it could be that people just don’t care about this year’s word…

    This year was not a catastrophe, anonyme.

    P.S. R.I.P. stands for rest in peace… words that are so bad and so general and have so many meanings they should be buried. FYI.

    Who am I commenting to, anyway? I assume I’m talking to the writers…?

    Reply
  111. anonyme -  November 19, 2012 - 3:24 pm

    But but… Castrophony…

    Reply
  112. Nshera -  November 19, 2012 - 2:52 pm

    I do like the word! (Y) :-)

    Reply
  113. Senor Jose -  November 19, 2012 - 2:30 pm

    Your supposition is false. 2012 is not over and the game is still a foot.

    Reply
  114. KJ -  November 19, 2012 - 2:24 pm

    OMG

    Reply
  115. chocolatechips12347 -  November 19, 2012 - 2:22 pm

    Chase Rakish—- was this really your first word??? thats so funny!

    Reply
  116. toby -  November 19, 2012 - 1:59 pm

    I think it was a good word to sum up this year. I can’t believe that it’s almost over. Even with all that’s happened, this “bluster filled” year has gone by quick.

    Reply
  117. chocolatechips12347 -  November 19, 2012 - 10:55 am

    Very good choice!

    Reply
  118. Chase Rakish -  November 19, 2012 - 10:51 am

    My first word!

    Reply
  119. Tyler -  November 19, 2012 - 10:25 am

    This word definitely describes what has happened in the last year.

    Reply
  120. Kayla -  November 19, 2012 - 9:49 am

    shut up this is the best the best word of the year

    Reply
  121. Kayla -  November 19, 2012 - 9:47 am

    WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOW that is amazing give me more give me more

    Reply
  122. BreNickszz -  November 19, 2012 - 9:44 am

    a very simplistic word indeed.

    Reply

Leave A Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked (required):

Related articles

Back to Top