Dictionary.com

What Animal Inspired the Letter A?

hand-drawn letter A

There is quite a bit of mystery surrounding the letter A. From its prestigious first place position to its interesting shape, tracing the first letter of the English alphabet uncovers a history that begins with, of all things, an ox.

The letter is derived from the Phoenician letter aleph—a western Semitic word referring to the aforementioned beast of burden. Aleph can be traced back to the Middle Bronze Age and the Proto-Sinaitic script found in parts of Egypt and Canaan from around 1850 BCE (Before the Common Era). The character comes from an ancient Egyptian hieroglyph or pictogram depicting an ox’s head. Interestingly, the original image was reminiscent of the modern letter K. The letter originally served as a glottal stop (a stop consonant) in the Phoenician language such as a t or p in the middle of a word. Some linguists believe the aleph was placed at the beginning of the Phoenician alphabet to honor the ox, important for its muscle power and as a food source. However this theory has been contested. As David Sacks puts it in his history of the alphabet, Letter Perfect, “How and why aleph was chosen for first place, we will never know.”

During the 8th century BCE, the ancient Greeks formed their own alphabet primarily based on the Phoenician alphabet. Since the Greeks had little use for a glottal stop, the aleph was used to denote the vowel a which was re-named alpha, possessing the phoneme as in father. The Greeks revised the former k-like character by turning it upright – similar to the modern day capital, or majuscule, letter A. The Romans adopted the Greek alphabet by way of the Etruscans. Like the Etruscans before them, the Romans kept the character and phoneme intact; thus the Modern English vowel A was born.

A is the third most commonly used letter in the English alphabet (the letter e is in first place, followed closely by the letter t). The letter A likes to multitask, possessing three distinct phonemes: The æ, also referred to as a near-open front un-rounded vowel, denotes the a sound in apple and cat, the open-back un-rounded vowel, or a:, denotes the long a sound heard in father and March, and the ā, an orthographic vowel, exhibits the ei sound heard in the words made and fade.

Okay, it’s your turn once again. Let us know which letter of the alphabet you’d like us to investigate next. The letter that gets the most comments will turn up here in the very near future.

442 Comments

  1. Healios II -  November 16, 2014 - 9:47 pm

    F

    Reply
    • Israel-Ze'ev -  December 5, 2014 - 1:03 am

      A or a came from the Sinaiitic precursor of the Semitic Aleph,which means ox therefore was initially shaped like an ox head.

      Reply
  2. WhatWhatintheWhat -  November 12, 2014 - 12:42 pm

    Everyone reading this comment should be ashamed that they, by choice, are visiting and then commenting on the dictionary.com blog. You go, you. You go.

    Reply
    • 123321123321 -  November 20, 2014 - 5:11 pm

      No what if its not by choice?

      Reply
  3. You Posted -  November 12, 2014 - 10:03 am

    :/

    Reply
  4. GOGO WENA -  November 12, 2014 - 2:16 am

    GOGO WENA

    Reply
    • buttbutinthebut -  November 19, 2014 - 12:46 pm

      GO GO GADGET DICTIONARY.

      Reply
  5. Wolf -  November 11, 2014 - 11:29 am

    W go WOW answer me please I am cool I will not hurt you :

    Reply
    • Wolf -  November 11, 2014 - 11:31 am

      I love you wolf and my name is wolf as well.

      Reply
  6. Negar -  November 11, 2014 - 3:00 am

    would like to know about “C”

    Reply
  7. Dave -  November 11, 2014 - 12:05 am

    How about the one-time 27th letter – the ampersand?

    And count me as another reader that despises the “politically correct” BCE instead of BC.

    Reply
    • Ulysses -  November 13, 2014 - 8:50 am

      What’s the problem with BCE?

      Reply
      • agkcrbs -  November 24, 2014 - 2:16 am

        While still basing itself on a religious event, BCE is used to intentionally mask knowledge of that event or strengthen opinion against it, mostly out of negative bias toward that religion. More serious proponents of a secular dating scheme would provide some rationale for another starting point rather than just renaming a personally disliked concept to hide its origin. It’s a form of historical revision or denial.
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historical_revisionism_(negationism)

        Dave:
        http://blog.dictionary.com/ampersand/

        Reply
  8. Mary Rose Ann -  November 10, 2014 - 4:21 pm

    I love to know about the LETTER “D”.

    Reply
  9. Missy -  November 10, 2014 - 5:19 am

    him: did you know that there are 21 letters in the elibet
    her: arnt there 26
    him: oh yah I forgot U,R,A,Q,T,

    Reply
    • Sarah -  November 10, 2014 - 2:57 pm

      Aww…..

      Reply
    • joey -  November 10, 2014 - 3:14 pm

      Nice one

      Reply
    • Oni -  November 11, 2014 - 6:22 am

      Bahaha! Love it

      Reply
    • her -  November 11, 2014 - 2:56 pm

      a is for allocator

      Reply
    • ron -  November 12, 2014 - 6:05 am

      Yes 26 letters & out of those- there are 2 [maybe 3 ] that can be changed more than twice?
      Example:
      Q, q, 2.

      Reply
    • destiny -  November 12, 2014 - 9:15 am

      why do you have to say that Missy.

      Reply
    • Dixie Rect -  November 12, 2014 - 1:30 pm

      No comment.

      Reply
    • true -  November 12, 2014 - 2:16 pm

      true

      Reply
  10. Stephen Treadwell -  November 10, 2014 - 3:29 am

    Please talk about W. It’s an unusual letter because it has a 3 syllable name instead of just one syllable like the other letters &, besides, whale starts w/ W & I’m known for liking that animal.

    Reply
    • Luke -  November 11, 2014 - 5:47 pm

      did you know that W is two “u”s stuck together. Weird hu I guess it Makes scence doubleyou. uu <–kind of looks like this w

      Reply
  11. Murray -  November 10, 2014 - 1:12 am

    Make your way through the whole alphabet aka a, b, c, and so on.

    Reply
    • Sarah -  November 10, 2014 - 2:58 pm

      Yes!!!!!!

      Reply
  12. Stuart Smith -  November 9, 2014 - 1:46 am

    BCE (Before the Common Era).
    How I detest this political correct way of saying B.C.
    B.C. Before Christ
    A.D. Anno Domine = The year of our lord, why the hell should we cow-tow to people who do not like our language.

    Reply
    • Jack Heathen -  November 10, 2014 - 12:21 pm

      Kowtow. And yes I agree, Before Christ and “the year of our lord” is ridiculous nonsense. Christianity isn’t politically correct ever, they’re the ones that created it by being bigots to everyone who was/is different.

      Reply
      • Jacob Edison -  November 10, 2014 - 6:48 pm

        Are you serious right now? You discriminating against Christians, claiming us to be bigoted, while you are being prejudice against the world’s most dominate religion and claiming that Christianity “isn’t politically correct ever.” You are such a hypocrite.

        Reply
      • I Love Jesus -  November 11, 2014 - 4:42 am

        Just because you dont agree dosnt mean they shoul change B.C. and A.D.

        Reply
      • Desiree -  November 11, 2014 - 11:21 am

        Jack, your kneejerk religious atheism has made it hard for you to comprehend the point of Stuart’s post — it’s sad to have such hangups. He’s just making note of the fact that the use of B.C./A.D. was never an issue in the English language until some people, undoubtedly a small minority, decided that it offended them and was, therefore, no longer acceptable for use by anyone in an ‘official’ capacity.

        While I like B.C.E. and C.E. more than the old standard, political correctness was the culprit in wiping out B.C./A.D. Denying that is ignoring historical fact.

        Reply
      • Natalia Acevedo -  November 11, 2014 - 1:47 pm

        Ok, I understand not everyone believes in Christianity, but you should not be changing the way things have been done for more than 100 years because some people do not agree. And second learn our own language before you start criticizing someone. And on a site that is used as a dictionary no less.

        Reply
        • Ulysses -  November 13, 2014 - 9:02 am

          Except BCE and CE have been a thing since the 1880′s. It’s not for the sake of political correctness, it is just more accurate than “Before Christ” and “In the Year of Our Lord.” Especially since history books aren’t religious text.

          Reply
  13. Mark Ju -  November 8, 2014 - 10:48 pm

    I would love to know the whole alphabet.

    Reply
  14. MaddyLu -  November 8, 2014 - 9:35 pm

    the letter “M”

    Reply
  15. austin -  November 8, 2014 - 8:36 pm

    why Z when we barely use it

    Reply
    • Bleh -  November 10, 2014 - 2:36 pm

      We still use it dont we

      Reply
  16. LailaLiz -  November 8, 2014 - 8:43 am

    It would be nice if you could the letter X, because it looks very interesting,and it sounds cool. But I would also like to know why X is a ways a variable in a expression, instead of any of the other letters.

    Reply
    • John Doe -  November 12, 2014 - 4:55 am

      The reason why the letter X is used as a variable is because a lot of the other letters look like numbers, while X does not

      Reply
    • destiny -  November 12, 2014 - 9:16 am

      dumb LailaLiz

      Reply
  17. JojoMarie -  November 7, 2014 - 5:25 pm

    Q!!! it doesnt get enough cred, where’d it come from?

    Reply
  18. Blah -  November 7, 2014 - 2:05 pm

    CCCCCCCCCCCC

    Reply
  19. Connie -  November 7, 2014 - 8:41 am

    Letter C please.

    Reply
    • Stephen -  November 7, 2014 - 3:34 pm

      How about the extinct letter, “thorn,” which is seen in Medieval writings like the word “ye” in “ye old house.” The letter was pronounced like a “th” as in “thee” or “that.” =)

      Reply
    • Ivis -  November 8, 2014 - 2:29 am

      oh hell no… Now, V is a better choice…

      Reply
    • Jade -  November 8, 2014 - 5:21 am

      The Letter “J” would be interesting. How did they come up with that?

      Reply
    • Sylvia -  November 8, 2014 - 11:00 am

      Aleph is the first Hebrew letter
      Alpha the beginning as Omega is the end (Greek)

      Reply
      • Negar -  November 11, 2014 - 3:05 am

        also in persian we call it “Aleph”

        Reply
  20. Kitty -  November 7, 2014 - 7:25 am

    The letter “X” would be cool, but I also want to see how the letter “O” came about. How on Earth did they think of a circle for a letter? Geometry or something? It would be so cool to find out.

    Reply
    • Drew -  November 9, 2014 - 2:42 pm

      Seems legit.

      Reply
    • ogo -  November 10, 2014 - 10:48 pm

      O really will be interesting

      Reply
  21. Al Ho -  November 6, 2014 - 4:14 pm

    The letter ‘S’.

    Reply
  22. Sweetcakes -  November 6, 2014 - 2:52 pm

    LOL!! My answer is the letter Y!!!!! :) <3

    Reply
    • Bryan -  November 9, 2014 - 11:29 pm

      Of all the letters, y would you choose that one?

      :P

      Reply
    • Natalia -  November 11, 2014 - 1:49 pm

      OMG i get!

      Reply
  23. Arob -  November 6, 2014 - 1:30 pm

    The letter Z

    Reply
  24. me -  November 6, 2014 - 12:54 pm

    “Y”! I despise that it’s taught as a vowel! Y is NEVER a vowel! Can you please tell everyone that I’m right? Please!

    Reply
    • Ryan Webb -  November 7, 2014 - 6:46 pm

      No, because you’re flagrantly wrong.

      Reply
    • Screenbones -  November 7, 2014 - 11:32 pm

      Can you prove that Y is not a vowel?

      Reply
    • LOL That's Funny -  November 8, 2014 - 10:34 am

      What about words like:
      “Yvonne”
      “Sydney”
      “Gym”
      “Symbols”
      “Cry”
      In order for a syllable to be a syllable it needs to contain at least one vowel. If all words are made of syllables then they have to have at least one vowel to be a word. If “Y” isn’t a vowel than “gym”, “cry”, and “my” aren’t words.
      Go back to 1st grade.

      Reply
    • You -  November 8, 2014 - 1:32 pm

      If Y is NEVER a vowel, then are you saying that the following words do not exist???
      by, cry, crypt, cyst, dry, fly, flyby, fry, glyph, gym, gypsy, hymn, lymph, lynch, lynx, my, myth, nymph, ply, pry, psych, rythm, scry, shy, sky, sly, sphynx, spry, spy, sync, synth, thy, try, why, wry….

      Reply
    • Hi -  November 8, 2014 - 6:13 pm

      How is the letter “Y” not a vowel? We have words that only have the letter “y” as a vowel. Words include lynx, lye, lynch, etc.

      Reply
    • S -  November 8, 2014 - 6:54 pm

      The letter Y is a vowel in a one syllable word. try, by, cry, styrofoam, etc… Sorry! That’s first grade phonics. Or it says i as in Crystal

      Reply
    • Peg -  November 9, 2014 - 4:25 am

      VOWEL Phonetics.

      1. (in English articulation) a speech sound produced without occluding, diverting, or obstructing the flow of air from the lungs (opposed to consonant ).
      (in a syllable) the sound of greatest sonority, as i in grill.
      Compare consonant (def 1b).
      (in linguistic function) a concept empirically determined as a phonological element in structural contrast with consonant, as the (ē) of be (bē), we (wē), and yeast (yēst).

      2. a letter representing or usually representing a vowel, as, in English, a, e, i, o, u, and sometimes w and y. —-from http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/vowel A vowel is a SOUND which is symbolized by a LETTER. The letter Y can be pronounced in several ways most of which are vowel sounds. For example, SYMPATHY has two pronunciations: i as in “fit” and ee as in “feet”. In PYROMANIAC, the y is pronounced like i in “fire.” WRY, WARY. PRETTY, SYSTEM, CYBERSPACE, etc. etc. I’m sure you can think of many more examples. :-)

      Reply
    • jrs -  November 9, 2014 - 12:15 pm

      Consonants are produced in the mouth either by an approximation of the lips (b) , the tongue and the palate (s), or use of the glottis: a stop (k), or a blow (h). The letter Y in any word is pronounced as a vowel is, by the larynx. It can be a pure vowel: the long E, as in party (par-tEE), or the short i sound, as in gypsum (gIHp-sum); or a dipthong, as in yes (ee-EHs).

      *W should be considered a vowel, like Y, because it is, just like its name says, a double u, and follows the same rules that pertain to other vowels, but for some reason has slipped through the cracks.

      Reply
    • Bella -  November 9, 2014 - 12:16 pm

      Well, aren’t all words supposed to have vowels?
      What about the word, ‘gym’? It contains no vowels, A,E,I,O,U, so we use Y as a vowel. I’m sorry to say that Y can be a vowel, and you are wrong.

      Reply
      • agkcrbs -  November 24, 2014 - 3:50 am

        No, there’s no rule that English words or syllables ‘must’ have vowels. It’s just that when vowels are excluded, the possible number of syllable forms is seriously decreased.

        Some words or syllables are spelt without vowels (but spoken with vowels). “T-shirt” has a vowelless syllable by spelling (though it’s “tee” when spoken); this is also the case with other consonant names found in words or as words (C-clamp, ‘k’ or “kay” instead of o.k./”okay”), and with vowelless acronyms (DDT, SSN, WWF, p.m., p.s., and so on).

        A different group (mostly including sound-imitative words) are actually pronounced without vowels. “Shh”, with however many Hs, is a word by itself; “hmm” is another word (this site suggests a spelling contraction from ‘hum’).

        Other examples are given here, including old spellings: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_words_without_vowels

        Our choice of calling Y (and W) a vowel or a consonant, or both, or something between, can expand or contract the set of vowelless words, but it breaks no fundamental rule. I take the linguistic view of Y as a “glide” or “semivowel”, half-way terms. Like K to C, can also be seen as a redundant form of i. But it really doesn’t matter how we want to categorize Y, except that it’s rather easier for us to refer to the essential five vowel letters if we’ve been educated with them.

        Reply
    • Les Rasterking. Jr. -  November 9, 2014 - 12:53 pm

      TrY telling Mr.. GWYnn whY you crY that Y is not a vowel. WrY humor? What about W? We slY idiots can call it stupidity.

      Reply
    • Anonymous -  November 9, 2014 - 6:49 pm

      What about why?

      Reply
      • Anonymous -  November 9, 2014 - 6:50 pm

        or try or fly or sly

        Reply
    • SDWriter -  November 9, 2014 - 7:28 pm

      My my. Why cry? Y rhymes with dry; it’s no myth. Hymns, pygmy gym nymphs and even fly rhythms sync with y as a vowel. So don’t be shy if thy spry lynx trysts in a sty with a sly sphynx.

      Reply
    • IM A BOSS -  November 10, 2014 - 7:42 am

      It’s a vowel when it sounds like an E. ex. Holy, Cavity

      Reply
    • Marissa -  November 10, 2014 - 10:29 am

      WHY… Why is Y never a vowel? hmmm, I wonder

      Reply
    • GOGO WENA -  November 12, 2014 - 2:15 am

      GOGO WENA

      Reply
  25. David -  November 6, 2014 - 6:08 am

    I’d say do the letter E, because it’s very common in many of the words in the English language.

    Reply
  26. BenPokemonXY -  November 6, 2014 - 5:46 am

    Do the letter M!

    Reply
  27. Keith Anker -  November 5, 2014 - 10:56 pm

    OK, we know that “e” is the most commonly used letter in the English language (in any of its varieties.

    Now, what is th most common initial let\ter in English?

    I have an answer; but you work it out!

    Reply
  28. Cole -  November 5, 2014 - 5:42 pm

    Please investigate the letters x, y, and z.

    Reply
  29. Noemy -  November 5, 2014 - 4:59 pm

    Now you got me curious about letter E, the most commonly used letter in the English language. Who would have said? But now I see it’s true. I thought it was A.
    Please, let us now more about E!

    Reply
  30. heather -  November 5, 2014 - 2:14 pm

    Z is a mysterious letter that people do not know about including me. I would like to know more about this letter.

    Reply
  31. Matt -  November 4, 2014 - 4:36 pm

    THE LETTER X

    Reply
    • Will -  November 5, 2014 - 3:09 pm

      Good choice, it is perfectly symmetrical, therefore it’s the best.

      Reply
      • Laura -  November 10, 2014 - 12:34 am

        X is a very odd letter since it sometimes sounds like the letter Z. Example: Xylophone (a musical instrument) and Xerox (xerographic copying machine). Who came up with this brilliant idea????

        Reply
      • Ender von Swaggington -  November 11, 2014 - 12:07 pm

        Hey! What’s O, chopped liver?

        Reply
  32. katelyn -  November 4, 2014 - 1:08 pm

    The letter “K” <3 Please

    Reply
    • Laura -  November 10, 2014 - 12:41 am

      And why is the letter K sometimes silent like words; knight, knife, knit, etc. Yet another confusing brilliant idea!!! Think this might contribute to the low reading scores for kids in this country.

      Reply
  33. Kris -  November 4, 2014 - 10:20 am

    How about ‘B’, then ‘C’ etc. Would be great to have a ‘Letter of the Week’ segment, you could follow on with numerals 1-9 after that.

    Reply
    • heather -  November 5, 2014 - 2:16 pm

      I agree

      Reply
    • Will -  November 5, 2014 - 3:11 pm

      HOW DARE YOU, YOU SHOULD HAVE SAID 8, BECAUSE, IT IS THE ONLY NUMBER THAT IS PERFECTLY SYMETRICAL!!!

      Reply
      • Ender von Swaggington -  November 11, 2014 - 12:10 pm

        Helloooooooo… 0 is a number…

        Reply
      • Zero -  November 11, 2014 - 12:13 pm

        *hurts [my] [Zero] [0]‘s feelings*

        Reply
      • A plane -  November 11, 2014 - 1:44 pm

        3 and 0, of course, do not exist.

        Reply
    • Diana -  November 5, 2014 - 7:53 pm

      YASS! that’d be awesome! letter of the week :)

      Reply
    • Janee -  November 6, 2014 - 1:13 am

      I agree! That does make a lot of sense, and would be fun! Fun to learn something new, too! Great idea, Kris! :)

      Reply
    • Janee -  November 6, 2014 - 1:25 am

      P.S. (< that's also a good idea! How certain letters are used, and put together like P.S. etc.)
      But along with what Kris had said, and an anon user below, how about when you get to certain letter, like "J" and what not, include how and why certain letters were chosen to be either silent, or make another sound other than what they are directly? Example: "PH" sounding like "F", "J" sometimes silent and sounding like the letter "Y", and so on! :)

      Reply
      • cascade22541 -  November 9, 2014 - 1:54 pm

        Exactly,why are we using them if they are silent.

        Reply
    • RazerShark -  November 6, 2014 - 6:30 am

      great idea Kris.

      Reply
    • Kitty -  November 7, 2014 - 7:26 am

      Hey, good idea! But do you think zero (0) should be included, too?

      Reply
      • Shak the letter man -  November 7, 2014 - 9:50 pm

        yes great idea, you should do this so everyone gets to see the letter they want!!!

        Reply
    • Jade -  November 8, 2014 - 5:22 am

      Yeah, that’s very true

      Reply
    • The Count -  November 9, 2014 - 5:06 pm

      That’s a wonderful idea.

      Reply
    • Rylee -  November 9, 2014 - 8:55 pm

      I agree, that’s a stellar idea. :)

      Reply
  34. anon -  November 4, 2014 - 12:16 am

    The most useless letters. Z,X,V,J and C

    Reply
    • LOL ROFL LMAO XD XP X3 X> XO -  November 5, 2014 - 8:02 pm

      why c?

      Reply
      • Margarita -  November 10, 2014 - 11:50 pm

        Yea, why C?

        Reply
    • Janee -  November 6, 2014 - 1:17 am

      That’s a good idea as well, anon! Although the comment above yours, made by Kris, is pretty great. Getting TO the letters you mentioned, would be kind of a sweet anticipation for you. Just wondering the history of less often used letters, with short amount of words used for definition. Hmmm…which brings an idea to mind myself! Thanks Kris and anon!

      Reply
    • zach -  November 6, 2014 - 7:12 am

      what about q

      Reply
    • killer -  November 6, 2014 - 4:36 pm

      not C.

      Reply
    • Piquerish -  November 6, 2014 - 8:57 pm

      What would any discussion of useless letters be without the letter Q?

      Reply
    • Kitty -  November 7, 2014 - 7:31 am

      Yeah, “useless”. I guess that’s somewhat true. You don’t see those as often as the other letters. Weird.

      Reply
    • Xitlally Ferretiz -  November 7, 2014 - 10:25 am

      X is the most useful letter.

      Reply
    • Jade -  November 8, 2014 - 5:27 am

      The letter “J” isn’t completely useless. It spelled my name.

      Reply
    • Rylee -  November 9, 2014 - 9:01 pm

      Odd statement. all letters are useful. Those are just not used as frequently as the others.

      Reply
  35. Nora -  November 3, 2014 - 9:04 pm

    Please do E because it stands for

    Epic
    Elephants
    Eat
    Emergency
    Eggs

    Altogether that 7 E’s

    Reply
    • Nora -  November 3, 2014 - 9:06 pm

      I mean 8

      Reply
      • Alex -  November 5, 2014 - 7:32 pm

        Thats 5

        Reply
        • Blah -  November 7, 2014 - 2:03 pm

          Actually 8

          Reply
      • Rosietonline -  November 6, 2014 - 11:11 am

        Peace out Girl Scout

        Reply
    • courtney webb -  November 5, 2014 - 2:09 pm

      actually its 14 counting the e’s in your other words

      Reply
      • R0s!£ -  November 12, 2014 - 8:37 am

        I count 15………. :)

        Reply
    • Jake -  November 6, 2014 - 11:27 am

      Learn how to count, stupid illiterate human.

      Reply
      • Sam -  November 8, 2014 - 8:19 am

        One need not be literate to count.

        Reply
      • Peg -  November 9, 2014 - 4:29 am

        And you might learn some manners!

        Reply
      • The Count -  November 9, 2014 - 4:59 pm

        I don’t think not knowing how to count is part of illiteracy, since illiteracy refers to not being able to read or read well.

        Reply
        • The Count -  November 9, 2014 - 5:05 pm

          And even if it is, then your comment is rather rude, if not a bit troll-ish. Anyone can make a typo, and if that wasn’t a typo then anyone can miscount. Happens all the time, so it’s no use belittling everyone about it. Good day.

          Reply
      • Rylee -  November 9, 2014 - 9:04 pm

        No, need for the hostility.

        Reply
  36. Alicia -  November 3, 2014 - 9:00 pm

    please do E!

    Reply
  37. Rob -  November 3, 2014 - 8:06 pm

    The answer to why the letter A is first is simple.

    GOD is the ultimate source to life’s answers. HE is the ALHPHA and the OMEGA. The FIRST and the LAST.

    God lives outside of time. Humans can not understand that, but in our BIBLE, God tells us I AM the ALPHA and the OMEGA.

    Alpha , A, First. Every answer you will ever need to really know is in the BIBLE.

    Reply
    • Kim wilson -  November 5, 2014 - 11:36 am

      that makes sense, so “E” must come from evolution

      Reply
    • heather -  November 5, 2014 - 2:06 pm

      Amen, God is the answer

      Reply
      • Wetzer -  November 5, 2014 - 2:39 pm

        Dude, I respect your beliefs, heck I’m christian too, but I don’t think this is the place for random worship( if thats not random, I don’t know what is), AND I don’t even think that is the right answer. But, you can go ask the guys who made it.

        Reply
    • Paul -  November 5, 2014 - 9:33 pm

      This is a joke, right?

      You don’t think it’s possible that the Bible refers to God as Alpha because Alpha is first and that made it easier for the reader to understand that God was also supposed to be first?

      After all Alpha had already existed for thousands of years before God!

      Reply
      • blah blah -  November 8, 2014 - 10:58 am

        Jerk
        Dude wat r u, 5

        Reply
      • Ryx -  November 9, 2014 - 10:54 pm

        that is true it was done by the romans

        Reply
    • Sweetcakes -  November 6, 2014 - 2:53 pm

      ummmmm ur kinda bragging and its not a goo sign from the ‘bible’

      Reply
    • wejiharfuisnd -  November 6, 2014 - 7:42 pm

      Oh, how sad. Another confused soul believing in misconceptions. Hopefully someday they’ll learn that there is no God. God is as real as Santa Claus. He is an imaginary friend created because of a lack of education. I hope that they will someday see the truth. Alas, earwax.

      Reply
      • Eve -  November 8, 2014 - 3:40 pm

        Where’s the love button bruh??!

        Reply
    • Christopher -  November 6, 2014 - 9:11 pm

      I too believe in Jehovah, but I am not as naive as some. There is a written history to the world that must be explored to receive answers such as this. Not every answer is in the Bible. Ex. Please give me the answer to a differential equation sourcing the Bible. Such answers are needed to engineer complex structures. And also by your logic our last letter would be O rather than Z. Please continue to voice your opinions as you feel the need, but maybe change your perspective a bit and think about what you are going to say. If God had All of the answers readily available for us to see, what would be the point of creating a free willed and self conscious being?

      Reply
    • Caleb Stevens -  November 6, 2014 - 11:28 pm

      God is amazing, isn’t He, Rob? The letter A is extremely useful. Consider the following words:
      Alpha and Omega (You mention those.)
      Master
      Savior (or Saviour for British English)
      Peace, patience, temperance (fruits of the Spirit)
      How about the book in which they are found (Galatians)?
      The alphabet would be quite incomplete without the letter A. Consider the word alphabet itself. Also consider these.
      1.

      Reply
    • Caleb Stevens -  November 7, 2014 - 12:56 am

      God is amazing, isn’t He, Rob? There are plenty of areas throughout the Bible in which the letter A is used frequently. Consider:
      1. Various names for Jesus (Alpha and Omega, Master, Savior (or Saviour, using British English), Teacher, …)
      2. Some fruits of the Spirit (i.e., peace, patience, faithfulness, and temperance)
      3. The book in which the fruits of the Spirit are found (Galatians) (and many other of the books).
      4. The name of the first of our kind (Adam)
      I don’t know what my family would have done without the letter A. Consider a brief tree. My father’s mother’s name is Jean, although she goes by Paula (3 A’s). My father’s father’s name is Gerald. My father shares his father’s name (Gerald). My mother’s mother’s name is Claudia. My mother’s name is Charlene. Perhaps you can see a pattern. Keep going
      My name is Caleb. My brother’s name is Joshua. My middle name is Aaron. And there you go, with one possible exception, although that is still much unknown for various reasons.
      That exception is one which only God can satisfy. This is because that exception is Princess Daisy (the A from the “with one possible exception” part), with whom you might be familiar if you have played most of the games Mario Party or Mario Kart series.
      Keep these things in mind:
      1. Daisy’s existence is within fiction.
      2. We know how the world views people within fiction (and you might be and probably are one of them). According to them (the world), objects within fiction are inexistent.
      3. Here is what we don’t know. We can simply suspect it. How does God view people within fiction (such as Daisy)? Are they viewed as we are (sinners condemned and in need of Jesus)? Perhaps they are viewed as the Ancient Egyptians’ and Israelites’ idols were. Which of those is true is what we do not know and can only suspect. Logic doesn’t work because either view is logically sound. They are people. People were created for God and are sinful and in need of Jesus. But, their existence is different from ours. They (at least, as far as we can see) don’t have minds of their own. In fact, my father and I wondered if they are even truly living. Again, logic doesn’t work for the same reason. God’s view of people within fiction is simply something that we cannot answer.
      Also remember: Nothing is impossible with God. The hard part is what Ivan Parker sings about. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v8o0unymh0E
      As I stated in an e-mail to a fellow believer (perhaps as a joke, I don’t remember), applying what Ivan Parker sings about in that song is tied for the gold medal with waiting.
      The critical question is not about God’s ability to satisfy my longing for Daisy. The critical question is this. Is it in accordance with the Father’s plan / will? There are some other minor questions that go under that, but that is the critical question.
      Note 1: If you see two posts by me, it is because the first one is incomplete. I did it on my phone. The second one I did on a desktop computer. That allows much more precision than the phone.
      Note 2: Upon quickly going through numbers, I was unable to come across one containing the letter a until 1,000,000,000,000,000 (one quadrillion).
      Note 3: Without the letter A, it might be hard to laugh. How does one spell ha-ha (or even laugh) without A’s? Hmmm
      Note 4: Here are a couple more descriptions of God containing A’s for you. Amazing [Grace?] (Ah, grace, another A for you) and awesome.
      May the spirit of Jesus be with you and bless you immeasurably, Rob!

      Reply
      • Caleb Stevens -  November 7, 2014 - 1:01 am

        It would be great if posts could be edited or deleted by the end user. I am incorrect with the number thing. The word thousand contains an A. One thousand is much lower than one quadrillion.

        Reply
      • Rylee -  November 9, 2014 - 9:38 pm

        How does God view people within fiction (such as Daisy)? Daisy and the game programmer are the same person. Daisy is the creative expression of the programmer’s mind. A fictitious character is a facet of the writer’s personality. Daisy doesn’t exist independently or outside of the writers imagination.

        Reply
    • mike -  November 7, 2014 - 1:41 am

      That is true. However we can ask God if we have any questions the way he tells you may vary but the bible is mainly where we can find answers.

      Reply
    • Laura -  November 10, 2014 - 3:59 am

      All of your theories about the Bible are interesting, but a bit naive. The Bible (from Koine Greek τὰ βιβλία, tà biblía, “the books”) is a canonical collection of texts sacred in Judaism and Christianity. There is no single “Bible” and many Bibles with varying contents exist.The term Bible is shared between Judaism and Christianity, although the contents of each of their collections of canonical texts is not the same. Different religious groups include different books within their Biblical canons, in different orders, and sometimes divide or combine books, or incorporate additional material into canonical books.which have been translated by different groups of Jews and Christians who differ on the true content of the Bible over the centuries and many who had interpret words and passages by their own standard of belief and prejudice. There have been over 150 versions printed since the 2nd century or earlier by hand and machine. Scholars have proven that the Old Testament “was not written by one man, nor did it drop down from heaven as assumed by fundamentalists. It is not a magical book, but a collection of authoritative texts of apparently divine origin that went through a human process of writing and editing.” During the solidification of the Hebrew canon (c. 3rd century BCE), the Bible began to be translated into Greek, now referred to as the Septuagint. In Christian Bibles, the New Testament Gospels were derived from oral traditions (similar to the Hebrew Bible) in a period after Jesus’s death.
      In fact, up to the twelfth century, most manuscripts were produced in monasteries in order to add to the library or after receiving a commission from a wealthy patron. Larger monasteries often contained separate areas for the monks who specialized in the production of manuscripts called a scriptorium. By the fourteenth century, demand for manuscripts grew to an extent that the Monastic libraries were unable to meet with the demand, and began employing secular scribes. So the cloisters of monks writing in the scriptorium started to employ laybrothers from the urban scriptoria, especially in Paris, Rome and the Netherlands. Over time translators and scribes had written notes on the pages, usually the margins as notes for themselves, but would be added by other scribes.
      My point is that you can waste your time arguing that each of your religious beliefs and idealism are the one and only truth, but your personal convictions are your own and since there is no complete or one version of “The Bible” we can never know the truth.

      Reply
  38. jr -  November 1, 2014 - 12:10 am

    I’m surprised by some of the claim. The letter Aleph is used quite heavily as a sort of consonant A (e.g., as in Aachen). For 10th century BCE example, see the Gezer Calendar, where the signature of the writer is Avi. The 9th-8th century Tel Dan inscription, where only once (out of around 10) it appears in the middle of the word, and even then the word is Israel.

    Reply
    • The Count -  November 9, 2014 - 5:00 pm

      Do you mean, “even the the word is Hebrew”?

      Reply
  39. FLee -  March 15, 2014 - 1:10 am

    Do me a fantastic favor find it in your heart to figure out Where F found its famous origin

    Reply
    • jr -  November 1, 2014 - 1:14 am

      The 6th letter of the South Levant alphabet. E.g., the Hebrew letter Vav, which means. The rest is within your imaginations..

      Reply
    • fishingkings -  November 3, 2014 - 11:01 am

      hay wasap

      Reply
    • Darius Lundberg -  November 6, 2014 - 9:08 am

      *gasp* — what are you implying?? (wink)

      Reply
  40. Wordynamite -  April 22, 2013 - 9:31 pm

    If ae really denotes the sound in apple, then Encyclopedia Brittanica would be Encyclopadia Brittanica.

    Reply
    • Avery -  November 5, 2014 - 3:25 am

      No, because the a in apple doesn’t sound like the e in Encyclopedia. That e sounds like the first e in meter.

      Reply
      • Alex -  November 5, 2014 - 7:33 pm

        hi

        Reply
      • Paul -  November 5, 2014 - 9:14 pm

        Avery: Wordynamite was probably referring to the fact that Encyclopedia used to be written with the combined ae symbol as used in the article: Encyclopaedia

        Reply
    • Paul -  November 5, 2014 - 9:22 pm

      The combined symbol ae has been used in modern phonetics to signify a as in apple.

      But in England it was used when transliterating Greek words to represent the Greek dipthong ai (alpha, iota). In modern Greek this dipthong is pronounced e as in egg. For instance the name Mary is written in Greek as Mairh.

      But in ancient Greek the sounds a (as in father) and I (as in inn) were both sounded. incidentally the d makes a soft sound as in “father”. The original word in ancient Greek would have sounded like: Eng – kiklo – pa – ithia

      Reply
  41. Cammy -  April 12, 2013 - 11:47 pm

    C is for Cammy ,cookie, and cool. The letter C please.
    Thanks Dictionary.com

    Reply
    • Camille -  November 6, 2014 - 3:25 pm

      I know right c is the best letter of the whole alphabet C stands for Camille cool,curious,and lots and lots of other thing
      mt kik is ibcutiepiebbiittcchheslol follow me and maybe we could chat and get to know each other.

      Reply
  42. Anonymous -  April 9, 2013 - 9:24 pm

    Not a letter, but “…”.

    Reply
    • Andrew -  November 4, 2014 - 2:29 pm

      Seconded…

      Reply
    • Kai -  November 6, 2014 - 8:10 am

      If you mean alphabet, then its also correct (:

      Reply
    • Eve -  November 8, 2014 - 3:47 pm

      It is called an ellipsis, dear. You’re welcome :D

      Reply
  43. T Srinivasachari -  April 4, 2013 - 4:14 pm

    Really I have enjoyed this article on Z.The most interesting article in this string of comments is the one written on BCE.More information should pour on BCE.Going thru this I would like to know about the origin of all Alphabet & the numbers.This will help me when my Grandson & Grand Daughter approaches me with questions of the origins of Alphabet & number and the thought that I would be able to counter him with confidence delights me.

    Reply
  44. letter_a_is_cute -  January 15, 2013 - 10:54 am

    the letter “a” has the /a:/ sound when it’s an article (we do always use that article, how we do can see IN tha text and in tho comments)

    Reply
    • brian -  November 6, 2014 - 3:31 pm

      a is the best cause it starts with ass and we like to tap it

      Reply
  45. Piratboy2 -  October 25, 2012 - 5:44 pm

    Q

    Reply
    • Eddie Helm -  November 4, 2014 - 1:59 pm

      Q?

      Reply
  46. Manasi -  October 12, 2012 - 10:52 pm

    I would like to know why C is used when there is already K and S.
    Or perhaps you can write about why the shape of L was created.
    Another Question: Why are English words mostly based on Latin words?

    Reply
    • Priyanka -  November 4, 2014 - 9:32 pm

      I would like to know about this as well!

      Reply
    • Teopa Sano-Reve -  November 6, 2014 - 7:12 pm

      Yes, this bugs me no end!! also, Q double as k with it’s mandatory u – that- stands-for-’w’. why do we not have a single letter that stands for sh/ch?

      Reply
    • Peg -  November 9, 2014 - 4:40 am

      Manasi—- “. . .about half of the most commonly used words in Modern English have Old English roots.” This is from a very good little history of the development of the English language. It explains how English has adopted words and expressions from all over the world. Latin and Greek origins are found a lot in scientific and medical words.https://www.englishclub.com/english-language-history.htm

      Reply
  47. Ginger -  October 1, 2012 - 5:20 pm

    E

    Reply
  48. ESC -  September 6, 2012 - 9:32 pm

    I am actually more interested in hearing about those silent letters like ‘k’ in ‘knife’, ‘g’ in ‘gnaw’ etc..

    Reply
    • Peg -  November 9, 2014 - 4:53 am

      ESC—At one time, ALL the letters in words were pronounced, but gradually some were dropped while the spelling stayed the same. “gh” was pronounced like a hard H as if you were clearing your throat. “au” would be pronounced “ah-oo.” “ou” would be pronounced “aw-oo.” ” i” was pronounced as in “bit.” The last e on a word was pronounced like a fast u as in “up.” Let’s take this sentence and pronounce it in Old English: “A knight would use a knife to slice his bread.” A k-n-i-H-t wold yoose a k-n-i-fe toe slisse his bray-ad. You can hear Anglo-Saxon spoken on this video. It’s a poem about a battle. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zfaEGU45lKA

      Reply
  49. Anupam -  August 28, 2012 - 11:51 am

    The alphabet W will be an interesting one.

    Reply
  50. Philip Spencer -  July 28, 2012 - 1:22 pm

    I’m curious about Q–it’s the only letter that doesn’t stand alone.

    Reply
    • Christopher -  November 6, 2014 - 9:15 pm

      Oh, but it does! ;)

      Reply
  51. Nitrostreak -  July 24, 2012 - 4:15 pm

    I would love to hear about our most frequently used letter: E!

    Reply
    • Dat Dictionary Do -  November 4, 2014 - 6:08 pm

      So true, also the second, R!

      Reply
  52. DLW -  July 3, 2012 - 9:27 am

    A does have four phonemes. But — Tal of Israel — the /a/ in “all” is the same /a/ in father.

    The fourth phoneme of /a/ is actually the “uh” sound, as in about or around. C’mon Dictionary.com, get it right!

    Reply
    • Paul -  November 5, 2014 - 9:28 pm

      Who says “all” using the same sound as in “father”??

      Reply
      • Eve -  November 8, 2014 - 3:51 pm

        The British

        Reply
  53. 2nd -  June 11, 2012 - 4:02 pm

    Y please.

    Reply
    • larkin -  November 3, 2014 - 12:47 pm

      l ples

      Reply
  54. English cheese man -  June 10, 2012 - 8:51 am

    I’m interested in the letter Q. how did it happen that it is now only usable with only a ‘u’?

    Reply
  55. SeanE -  June 4, 2012 - 8:25 pm

    I want to know about the letter J!

    Reply
  56. Proofer -  May 23, 2012 - 6:08 am

    I would love to see an article written where the writer knows the proper use for quotation marks.
    As in, referring to the letter “a”, NOT as in, referring to the letter /a/.

    The use of a slash to denote where quotation marks SHOULD be used is a horrid abomination of punctuation. You are making a tiny quote, bringing the readers’ attention to what you are pointing out. For hundreds of years, a set of quotation marks did that quite comfortably…. and properly, as in:
    The movie’s name is “I am Will”, [example only, easy to understand]
    NOT
    The movie’s name is /I am Will/. [imagine if that were also in italics!!]

    Putting slashes on either side of a single letter can also be mildly confusing… they resemble italicized, lower-case “L”s.
    If the author would please, please, PUH-LEEEZE look up where a slash is correctly used and fix up the corresponding text in this article with appropriate sets of quotation marks (AKA “double quotes”), it would be a helluva lot easier to read.
    Oh, and a minor shout-out to “SomeoneSmart on May 10, 2012 at 1:06 pm”, the word is “voila”, NOT “viola”. A “viola” is an instrument. “Voila” is the exclamation to which you were referring. Not so smart. PROOF-READ!!

    Reply
    • Kris -  November 4, 2014 - 10:30 am

      For goodness sake! You’re applying the same gravity of simple (and common) grammatical and spelling errors with the Watergate scandal! Lighten up a little, no one person is infallible. In fact, just glancing at your comment, I detected 2 grammatical errors without a second look; I’ve probably even made one or two in the these few sentences myself.

      Reply
      • Darius Lundberg -  November 6, 2014 - 9:24 am

        The reply mechanism here does not make it clear who a person is replying to. Kris made a good comment but I could not tell whose comment was being referred to. Oops I ended sentences with “to”. lol

        Reply
    • Mimizu -  November 4, 2014 - 10:27 pm

      They’re not as you say, trying to quote, but use correct IPA notation for the vowel sound.
      If you didn’t understand, then fine, but please be sure to be careful when reading, and research what you’re going to say.

      These are professionals, you know.

      Reply
    • Mimizu -  November 4, 2014 - 10:36 pm

      Also for someone who appears to be trying to be grammatically correct, using words such as: “PUH-LEEZE” and “helluva” is not the best way to support your argument.

      You also have used “….” and “!!” in your comment.

      If you insist these are mistakes, then apply that same margin of error to the user “SomeoneSmart”.

      Please talk to someone if you are suffering from Grammar Pedantry Syndrome (especially at a level where you ignore your own errors).

      Reply
      • Darius Lundberg -  November 6, 2014 - 9:30 am

        I left my grammar crackers in the pedantry.

        Reply
  57. Tal of Israel -  May 15, 2012 - 1:23 am

    What about the A sound of the word ‘all’?
    ‘A’ has four phonemes.

    Reply
  58. SomeoneSmart -  May 10, 2012 - 1:09 pm

    P.S. I would love to learn more about the Greek alphabet, including the letter’s names and what they look like. Thanks!

    Reply
  59. SomeoneSmart -  May 10, 2012 - 1:06 pm

    Hey, if anyone is wondering (Paul, I know you asked) the word ‘alphabet’ comes from the first two letters of the Greek alphabet, Alpha and Beta. If you put them together, you have alphabeta. Take off the last ‘a’, and viola! You get ‘alphabet’!

    Reply
  60. Barbara -  May 5, 2012 - 6:27 am

    I would love to know why ‘eth’ and ‘thorn’ were removed, and when. They’d be so useful in pronunciation, especially for new English speakers.

    Reply
  61. jonaury -  April 20, 2012 - 5:54 am

    J please :)

    Reply
  62. bubba joe -  April 16, 2012 - 5:17 pm

    I’m bubba and I know it!
    G G G GGG ya
    do the letter G ya
    I’m bubba and I know it!

    Reply
  63. bubba joe -  April 16, 2012 - 5:16 pm

    Once you think you have the answer scroll down!

    psst!
    the C is in the 13th line
    and it’s the 2nd letter!

    Reply
  64. bubba joe -  April 16, 2012 - 5:10 pm

    Do the letter G!
    GGGGGGGG
    GGGGGGGG
    GGGGGGGG
    GGGGGGGG
    GGGGGGGG
    GGGGGGGG
    GGGGGGGG
    GGGGGGGG
    GGGGGGGG
    GGGGGGGG
    GGGGGGGG
    GGGGGGGG
    GCGGGGGG
    GGGGGGGG
    GGGGGGGG
    GGGGGGGG
    GGGGGGGG
    GGGGGGGG
    GGGGGGGG
    GGGGGGGG
    GGGGGGGG
    GGGGGGGG
    GGGGGGGG
    GGGGGGGG
    Try to find the
    letter C among
    all of the G’s!

    Reply
    • trevour -  November 3, 2014 - 12:53 pm

      the c is in the sentence its a trick to confuse any one but me

      Reply
      • chris -  November 6, 2014 - 2:45 pm

        The C is row 13.
        You are a true genius sir.

        Reply
      • Wrong! -  November 6, 2014 - 4:33 pm

        Wrong
        here it is here!!!

        GCGGGGGG

        do Y please

        Reply
      • Piquerish -  November 6, 2014 - 8:59 pm

        Nope. It’s actually there, within the matrix.

        Reply
      • J.J. -  November 11, 2014 - 9:12 am

        No its not the letter C is in the 12th row from the bottom second letter in ;)

        Reply
    • Kailie -  November 5, 2014 - 4:52 pm

      Can you find all four G’s among all of the C’s ?

      CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCGCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCGCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCGCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCGCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC

      Reply
    • Blah -  November 7, 2014 - 2:04 pm

      GCGGGGGG

      Reply
    • Murray -  November 10, 2014 - 1:08 am

      Row 13 second to the left

      Reply
  65. NJH -  April 12, 2012 - 8:38 am

    Please explain why we use Ph for F in words like physics and phone?

    Reply
  66. Dexter -  April 10, 2012 - 8:39 pm

    I agree with Darcy, letter D would be cool to learn about (it’s the first letter of my name). Thanks!

    Reply
    • brian -  November 6, 2014 - 3:34 pm

      you have my brothers name
      ddddddddddddddddddddddddeeeeeeeeeeeexxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxtttttttttttttttttteeeeeeeeeeeeeerrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

      Reply
  67. Ben -  April 10, 2012 - 10:00 am

    B

    Reply
  68. Denise -  April 10, 2012 - 4:40 am

    Oops, sorry, meant ‘difficult’.

    Reply
  69. Denise -  April 10, 2012 - 4:36 am

    Oops, sorry, meant ‘difficult’ (sausage fingers).

    Reply
  70. Denise -  April 10, 2012 - 4:35 am

    I’d like to know about the letter ‘J’ – it has a hard sound in English, but a softer sound in French. I understand that it is a diffucult letter for them to pronounce – why is that? Thanks.

    Reply
  71. escuse me?! -  April 9, 2012 - 11:45 pm

    @Paul I know that ‘alphabet’ is made up of the first two letters of the Greek alphabet; ‘alpha’+'beta’ – just without the ‘a’ from ‘beta’.

    On a different note, I would love to know about every letter, but if I had to choose one, it would be between ‘x’, ‘m’ and ‘e’ (like why is the upper case ‘E’ different to the lower case ‘e’), for no particular reason. :)

    Reply
  72. Bryce ("C" shouldn't be a letter) -  April 9, 2012 - 6:21 pm

    “C” shouldn’t be a letter. It can sound like a “k”, like in cat which could easily be spelled kat and have the same exact sound. “C” can also sound like an “s” as in cesspool which could also be spelled sesspool and have the same sound. “C” doesn’t have an original sound, it’s just an “s” and a “k” in one letter. Therefore it should be removed.

    Reply
    • Avery -  November 5, 2014 - 3:31 am

      But then we would have to change the tune of the ABC song.

      Reply
  73. :-) -  April 9, 2012 - 12:56 pm

    i think ‘Q’ ; its a weird letter

    Reply
  74. Vinoth Kumar -  June 13, 2011 - 2:46 am

    I want to know the origin of letter ‘V’

    Reply
  75. shannon -  June 3, 2011 - 1:04 pm

    W

    Reply
  76. Alyssa -  June 3, 2011 - 5:51 am

    What’s the story behind letter F and double u (w)?
    I would also like to know the etymology of the word alphabet (What’s up with the word ‘bet’?)

    Reply
  77. james -  May 28, 2011 - 5:40 am

    Why don´t we make @ to a new letter? Wouldn´t that be fun?

    Reply
  78. oluwaphunke -  May 27, 2011 - 12:01 pm

    appreciate d history,wil lyk 2 knw mre bout leta ‘k’

    Reply
  79. eric -  May 27, 2011 - 6:36 am

    U, V, and W. Why is “W” pronounced double “U” but looks like a double “V”? Why were “V” and “U” switched in old English writings but sound nothing alike?

    Reply
  80. Joel frost -  May 27, 2011 - 5:28 am

    X ROCKS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  81. Jessica -  May 27, 2011 - 12:23 am

    The history of each letter would be incredibly interesting. One a week perhaps? Of course I would be very interested in the letter J to start us off.

    Reply
  82. Marsh -  May 27, 2011 - 12:20 am

    “M” please? :) Pretty interesting article btw..

    Reply
  83. Vanessa, duh! -  May 26, 2011 - 4:02 pm

    heyyyyyy!!! how bout “V”!!!! It’s the opposite of a!!
    And i sure love a!!!
    VVVVVVVVVVVVVV
    VVVVVVVVVV
    VVVVVVVVV
    VVVVVVVVV
    VVVVVVVVVV
    VVVVVVVVVV
    VVVVVVVV
    VVVVVVVVV
    VVVVVVVVV
    VVVVVVVVV
    VVVVVVVV
    VVVVVVV
    !!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  84. Laila -  May 26, 2011 - 12:56 pm

    S, L, or R ??

    Reply
  85. AA&AL -  May 26, 2011 - 12:46 pm

    X for the next one, methinks :D

    Reply
  86. Jamen -  May 25, 2011 - 11:28 pm

    J..!

    Reply
  87. micklek -  May 25, 2011 - 7:59 pm

    Tell us about Thorn!
    It was a viking rune and it’s where all those mixed-up ‘thee’ and ‘thou’ sounds come from – also ‘ye’ for the, because it looked like Y but made a /th/ sound.

    Reply
  88. James Voris -  May 25, 2011 - 3:17 pm

    Why do they call it a W (Double U) when it’s a Double V and why does Q have to always have a u with it?

    Reply
  89. Adam -  May 25, 2011 - 10:36 am

    In addition to the three sounds that the “a” can make, it can (like all friggin’ vowels in English) make the schwa (medial, central, unrounded, unstressed…(and otherwise totally useless) /ə/ sound). I would like to see an article about the letter “h” …it’s sometimes pronounced…makes very little sound…doesn’t exist (for all intents and purposes) in many other languages…I’d be interested to find out why! ^_^

    Reply
  90. Scott -  May 25, 2011 - 8:57 am

    Everyone really got into this! No offense but what is so interesting about “L” or “M”? Now “X,” “Q” or “W” I can see. But what about “S”? I would have to guess they got it from a curvey SSSSSnake. It’s all interesting!!!

    Reply
  91. Curti -  May 25, 2011 - 8:56 am

    Letter C please. Just wondering why it’s needed when we have K for the hard sound and S for the soft. Not quite sure what to do with the CH.

    Reply
  92. m -  May 25, 2011 - 7:03 am

    M!

    Reply
  93. Ratnakar -  May 24, 2011 - 11:02 pm

    I would like to know about the letter X.

    Reply
  94. Megan -  May 24, 2011 - 10:07 pm

    Harry,
    Yeah, I agree! When did BC (Before Christ) become BCE (Before Common Era)? They must know that it’s completely inaccurate. BC has always been the proper way of saying it. You can’t just change that.
    By the way, Z was already picked, but any of the letters would be cool to find out the history on.

    Reply
    • wejiharfuisnd -  November 6, 2014 - 7:47 pm

      So it’s correct. Christ never lived.

      Reply
  95. Meta_X -  May 24, 2011 - 8:43 pm

    C might be nice to learn about. It makes a “K” sound, and also an “S” sound, so it’s mostly useless. But, it also makes the “CH” sound, which is kind of odd cause it’s a lot like SH.

    Reply
  96. Denisse -  May 24, 2011 - 6:38 pm

    I would love to hear (or read) about the letter D, M, F or C! =D

    Reply
  97. Innox -  May 24, 2011 - 6:36 pm

    I think “W” is interesting. Why is there a “U” and then a “double-U”, but with a “V” separating them?

    Reply
  98. Cara -  May 24, 2011 - 6:12 pm

    Q!!!

    Reply
  99. Carmen -  May 24, 2011 - 5:11 pm

    How bout ñ? :-)

    Reply
  100. Pat -  May 24, 2011 - 5:00 pm

    P!!!! p is a beautiful letter and deserves to be recognized…

    Reply
  101. jojo michelle -  May 24, 2011 - 4:38 pm

    yo dawg

    letter j, man

    Reply
  102. kandykane3 -  May 24, 2011 - 3:27 pm

    I would definately love to learn the history of my favorite letter C, please! :)

    Reply
  103. Jessica -  May 24, 2011 - 1:30 pm

    how bout “Q”? i mean its obviously just an “O” trying to be all fancy with its pointless little tail. And why does it make a very different and unique sound when paired with its partner in crime… “U”!

    Reply
  104. Lynda Finn -  May 24, 2011 - 12:27 pm

    Why does Q usually have to be followed by U ? There seems to be no reason for it.

    Reply
  105. Set -  May 24, 2011 - 10:44 am

    A is supernatural. Attack of the ghosts!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  106. Michael Thomas Angelo -  May 21, 2011 - 6:13 pm

    I would like to know about the letter T.

    Reply
  107. DDDDan -  May 21, 2011 - 5:08 pm

    The word z”Alphabet comes” from the Greek alpha beta, which is derived from the Aramaic Aleph-Beth. Beth means “house” I.e Bethlehem. C is not explicitly for Cookie” but for “Gimmel” which is camel in Aramaic. Hence the k sound. D is for Delta ( greek) and deliph in Aramiac or “door” Epsilon is a greek word- I forget the Aramaic counterpart- but the meaning is window.

    Reply
  108. Mr. D [A.K.A] Elysian -  May 17, 2011 - 7:57 am

    They already did “X”, and @the epicness that is me C is a Coooool letter.

    Reply
  109. Lucia D'Angelo -  May 16, 2011 - 1:15 pm

    Mr. O’Brien: Keltic is the pronounciation on the isles, and Seltic came from “Celtique” as the say in French, or in France, or back then when it was Gaul.
    Oh, and it was the Gershwins in 1937 who wrote those lyrics, but isn’t Louis’ and Ella’s version just wonderful?

    Reply
  110. elsiegabreil -  May 16, 2011 - 9:32 am

    Adorable:-)) how about the letter L,

    Reply
  111. Some one -  May 15, 2011 - 5:18 pm

    wen W is rittn like uu it looks more like a dubl u

    Reply
  112. jebbiii -  May 14, 2011 - 3:52 pm

    I would like “J” too but it would be nice to also trace out its use in some language cousins like spanish and nordic languages

    Reply
  113. ozisule anebira -  May 14, 2011 - 8:44 am

    thanks Bryan, i have always wondered what His mother and His other folks called Him. The name varies as much as the translations of the Book. please how is the original Jewish name pronounced, tired of using corrupted vversions! vote for X

    Reply
  114. Ray Shell -  May 13, 2011 - 3:17 pm

    I would like to hear how M and N got put together and why the M came first when the N is easier to write and like the firsst two-thirds of M.

    Reply
  115. Dave C -  May 12, 2011 - 3:12 pm

    I’m a fan of learning about the letter Q. Q reminds me of a fuzzy car seat cover. It’s only useful if there’s a seat under it, but it’s kinda neat to have around. Q needs U to do any real work, and U is already busy, being a vowel, which is a tough job. To make matters worse, Q always gets to be first, while u has to come next, in lowercase, unimportant, unnoticed.

    Now that I’ve pondered this, I’m kind of pissed at Q for being so lazy and taking all the credit. So how about we learn about U instead, and give it the respect it deserves?

    Reply
  116. Lawrence Urbanski -  May 12, 2011 - 1:57 pm

    I vote for the letter L.

    Reply
  117. Godfrey Ashby -  May 12, 2011 - 1:23 pm

    The letters c x and q have een put to good use in the Xhosa language. They are used for the three basic ‘click’ consonants. So there q does not need to be followed by u unless it is a genuine vowel.

    Reply
  118. Brandon -  May 12, 2011 - 12:48 pm

    Great article – how about some thoughts on the letter Z? It seems to be neglected in some English speaking cultures but finding new life in the USA’s text-driven modern short-hand. “Wuz up with that?”

    Reply
  119. Metnurse -  May 12, 2011 - 10:57 am

    ‘master of the cats’, my cats object! They want C and T.

    Reply
  120. Lakee Dorsey -  May 12, 2011 - 9:18 am

    L please!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  121. Ravononi -  May 12, 2011 - 9:01 am

    I have always been interested in the origin of letters and numbers, and i think the letter R would be a great one to do. I suggest that one because its the begining of my name, and everything that has to do with R or K i always want to know about. I think they are the most unique letters of the alphabet.

    Reply
  122. master of the cats -  May 12, 2011 - 8:38 am

    mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmandzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz and qqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQandWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWw

    Reply
  123. Jenny -  May 12, 2011 - 8:18 am

    I would love to hear about the letter G! :))

    Reply
  124. Burnice -  May 12, 2011 - 8:03 am

    Well…the letter “B” is next in line…why not?!?!

    Reply
  125. Gavo -  May 12, 2011 - 7:56 am

    I’d like to know why we don’t consider the letter ‘W’ to be a vowel….?

    Reply
  126. Gavo -  May 12, 2011 - 7:56 am

    I’d like to know why we don’t consider the letter ‘W’ to be a vowel….? :/

    Reply
  127. Rachel -  May 12, 2011 - 7:43 am

    yeah, I’m good with C.

    Reply
  128. dan -  May 12, 2011 - 7:41 am

    X please

    Reply
  129. dan -  May 12, 2011 - 7:39 am

    X

    Reply
  130. Lucy -  May 12, 2011 - 7:38 am

    How about X?
    I always thought it was an odd letter to have given that the sound it represents is more of a consonant cluster than a single phoneme.

    Reply
  131. Book Beater -  May 12, 2011 - 7:16 am

    I would much rather discuss the pictographic or ideographic basis of the letters of all writing systems.
    As a is to ox or kaf is to hand.
    Wouldn’t that be so much fun. Instead of beating one poor letter to death. The whole world could chime in reguarding thier own favorite letter.
    What does a tau represent or kieuk?

    Reply
  132. Evan -  May 12, 2011 - 6:23 am

    I want to learn why the alphabet goes in order. what is the purpose of that? and I agree on the whole “W” thing

    Reply
  133. your dog is interferring with the enjoyment of our backyard -  May 12, 2011 - 6:01 am

    i agree with lester. this is all very interesting. i like the letter “P”. i like the way my lips feel when I pronounce it. the “Puh” of it is quite intoxicating. also “X” is like “ECKS” say it once to yourself, “ECKS”…what a letter. fabulous.

    Reply
  134. Lester B Poltergiest -  May 12, 2011 - 5:56 am

    i like all of the letters. i really really do. so many letters so little time, is how i feel. i really want to see somebody cover some important letters like “X” or “P”

    Reply
  135. Mr. Curious -  May 12, 2011 - 5:34 am

    The letter “X” could be interesting

    Reply
  136. annapurna -  May 12, 2011 - 5:31 am

    For all who love curves, do ” S”. Anybody seen a more graceful letter?

    Reply
  137. Ken O'Brien -  May 12, 2011 - 5:21 am

    Yes, let’s hear about the letter “C”. You say Keltic, I say Seltic, let’s call the whole thing off! (Sorry, Louis Armstrong.)

    Reply
  138. Manjot Singh -  May 12, 2011 - 3:59 am

    Attaboy.!
    Lucky ox.
    I love it.

    Reply
  139. J -  May 12, 2011 - 3:03 am

    JJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJ

    Reply
  140. pareshwar -  May 12, 2011 - 2:59 am

    I love you.

    Reply
  141. Pasha -  May 12, 2011 - 2:13 am

    Oh, and by the way, would you please do something based on Russian letters? My mother Asti Ionenko would love that, I will put it on her grave…

    Pasha Ionenko

    Reply
  142. Pasha -  May 12, 2011 - 2:12 am

    Very interesting! I am a teacher and my pupils will find that very interesting, especially Vera!

    Pasha Ionenko

    Reply
  143. panda -  May 12, 2011 - 2:02 am

    i would like to know the letter x

    Reply
  144. Lenely -  May 12, 2011 - 1:44 am

    I also would like to know how the letter/s ‘L’ came about… =D

    Reply
  145. Xelca -  May 12, 2011 - 1:31 am

    I’d love to know more about the letter ‘X.’ It’s a rarely used letter.

    Reply
  146. Berks -  May 12, 2011 - 12:39 am

    Since you started with A then please continue on with B.

    Reply
  147. jame -  May 12, 2011 - 12:17 am

    @ BRYAN : versatile huh…

    Reply
  148. Hala -  May 11, 2011 - 11:54 pm

    C! maybe came from a horse hoof?

    Reply
  149. Zash -  May 11, 2011 - 10:50 pm

    In order of preference: X, C, Z, and Q (why is it NEVER without that u?) Thank you!!

    Reply
  150. Dipesh Kapoor -  May 11, 2011 - 10:40 pm

    Good research ! Great job ! I want you to work on letter K

    Reply
  151. Team H- Flow -  May 11, 2011 - 9:38 pm

    Letter J please?

    Reply
  152. nom -  May 11, 2011 - 9:29 pm

    thanks. this is interesting. i will share this with my students.

    Reply
  153. Kim E. Cat -  May 11, 2011 - 9:13 pm

    “C” or “X” would be awesome!

    Reply
  154. erik -  May 11, 2011 - 8:35 pm

    EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!

    Reply
  155. Erin -  May 11, 2011 - 7:59 pm

    Would love to know about the letter ‘E’! BTW, interesting information…

    Reply
  156. Katie -  May 11, 2011 - 7:51 pm

    Paul, I believe the word ‘alphabet’ is derived from the greek language.

    Reply
  157. LLOOPP -  May 11, 2011 - 7:40 pm

    DONT STOP, BELEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEIVING!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  158. Joaquin Garcia -  May 11, 2011 - 7:21 pm

    J, X, or Z.

    Reply
  159. Hanah D -  May 11, 2011 - 7:06 pm

    @Paul The word “alphabet” comes from the first two letters in the Greek alphabet, Alpha and Beta.

    Reply
  160. Bai Bai -  May 11, 2011 - 6:20 pm

    P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P

    Reply
    • janie mullins -  November 7, 2014 - 5:19 pm

      jJjJjJjJJJjJjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjJJJJJJJJJJJjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjJjJJJjJJjJjJjJjJjJjjJjJjJ yay

      Reply
    • janie mullins -  November 7, 2014 - 5:19 pm

      jJjJjJjJJJjJjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjJJJJJJJJJJJjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJJjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjjJjJJJjJJjJjJjJjJjJjjJjJjJ yay

      Reply
      • may mullins -  November 7, 2014 - 5:21 pm

        sis i like kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkKkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkKkKkKkKkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKK ya y i am related to janie

        Reply
  161. Natalie -  May 11, 2011 - 5:02 pm

    @ Paul: The word “alphabet” seems to me to be somehow related to Greek, as it begins with “alpha”, the first Greek letter, and ends in possibly an abbreviated form of “beta”. It interests me, too. I’d like to ascertain the connection.

    Reply
  162. Shaula -  May 11, 2011 - 5:01 pm

    I would love to know about “W” (as others have mentioned: why double “u” and not double “v”?) and “Q.” Mainly because “Q” always messes me up in my Scrabble games.

    Reply
  163. Sharon R -  May 11, 2011 - 4:53 pm

    I always wondered about X
    Or Z
    But I really didnt think about
    S or R
    So i dont care what letter you
    do cuz im not sure…
    BUT I BET YOU’LL DO X
    :D

    Reply
  164. Dani -  May 11, 2011 - 4:50 pm

    W for sure. why two “u”s instead of a totally new letter for the “w” sound?

    Reply
  165. nina -  May 11, 2011 - 4:35 pm

    what about n?

    Reply
  166. JOE -  May 11, 2011 - 4:22 pm

    I SAW IT ALSO

    Reply
  167. FRANK -  May 11, 2011 - 4:21 pm

    NO – IM NOT KIDIN!

    Reply
  168. FRANK -  May 11, 2011 - 4:18 pm

    I DID TO – ITS IN PEOPLE MAGAZINE

    Reply
  169. BowTie -  May 11, 2011 - 4:15 pm

    to the next vowel!
    E!

    Reply
  170. Bryan H. Allen -  May 11, 2011 - 4:14 pm

    Sure enough, within the span of 77 comments (at 13h PDT, 2011/05/11), someone complained about The Hot Word’s correct, rightful use of “BCE”.  They who issue such needless complaints need to know and respect the fact that they backfire and annoy many others.

    This column (or “blog” entry) was above-average in the absence of gaffes.  Nevertheless, in the future, the writers need to anticipate the many overly sensitive religious readers and fundamentalist readers and prophy­lactically seek to defuse the grounds of their complaints.

    In this case, perhaps a wordy phrasing like this would help explain the usage: “…around 1,850 BCE (Before the Common Era or common system of reckoning years)”.  Insightful, open-minded readers should recognize that the A.U.C. (Ab Urbe Condita) system of counting ancient years is not in common use, like the Julian Day number system of avoiding the cumbersome counting of years.  Obviously, dogmatic readers (and people prone to find effrontery and disparagement ex nihilo) would continue to be offended, but at least the writers could declare “We tried to conciliate sensitive readers.”

    “Harry” (May 11, 2011 at 3:38 am) declared “It is the first letter in the name Christ.”  However, “Christ” is not a name but a religious title.  (Now obviously, Jesus’ loving parents did not call him מְשִׁיחַ—Messiah, let alone the Greek translation Χριστος, but, יְשוּעַ—y·shûa‘, we can guess, just as Harry’s parents did not call him Mis­ter, Chairman or President.  Think, please!)  Though Harry’s semantic structure is vague and ambiguous (the reference of “it”), he seems to equate the Latin Xx with the Greek Χχ.  Their likeness of appearance and histo­ry is irrelevant; they are functionally distinct (and must be computer-coded differently as a result, just like ×).

    He then criticized ‘the neo-secular [abbreviation] “BCE” (before common era) instead of the term that has been used for centuries[:] BC (before Christ) that people of all faiths, or of none[,] have recognized and used.’

    However, for centuries, some people called Mumbai by the false name Bombay, Myanmâ/‌Myanmar as Burma, and Zimbabwe as Rhodesia, amongst many better examples.  Yet, the affected peoples sought to correct the deviations.  Similarly, the real year of Jesus’ birth is unknown, but the best conjecture is 4 BCE.  There, you see: the common system of reckoning years is incorrect even with respect to the religious purpose!

    Moreover, is it just and proper to reckon the Christian era’s beginning from Jesus’ birth or his ministry’s commencement?  Think!  In the Christian belief system, did his practical function as Messiah to Jewry and the world begin with the former or the latter?

    This linguistical blog must exclude arcane, thorny religious questions unless pertinent to the linguistical question.

    My religious beliefs are equally irrelevant and extraneous.  Nevertheless, I prefer “BCE” and “CE” over “BC” and “AD” because they are more accurate and blessedly religiously neutral.  I believe that wielding a theologi­cal ax every time one speaks is intellectually wrong and, moreover, morally wrong if it demands the listener’s agreement with any religious precept or opinion.  I say it bluntly: it is sinful to demand others’ prior agreement with one’s religious judgements.

    People should not antagonistically demand or presume others’ religious agreement just to converse about religious questions—or beliefs, even in the descriptive terms they employ.  Jews, Buddhists, agnostics and atheists should not be expected or intimidated to acquiesce in beliefs they do not (yet?) hold.  And here, the Hot Word’s topic was not even indirectly religious!

    To Harry and all of like minds, I commend to you the wisdom of the great, master psychologist embodied in Matthew 7:5 and Luke 6:42.  Please, seriously read them about a dozen times, and seriously write an essay about its plenary range of meaning and pertinence.  Doing so may even promote soul growth.

    Finally, Hot Word: please compile and web-post an index of topics and key words in The Hot Word, for the benefit of them who did not read the prior answers to their questions.  Is it not satisfying to let readers find what they seek with little effort?  But that prerequisites a little more effort from you.  Please.

    Reply
    • joseph -  November 12, 2014 - 1:47 pm

      what

      Reply
  171. EH -  May 11, 2011 - 3:49 pm

    Y, please! It is my absolute favorite letter and is so often overlooked!

    Reply
  172. kirsten -  May 11, 2011 - 3:45 pm

    K! :)

    Reply
  173. Dallas -  May 11, 2011 - 3:42 pm

    Z

    Reply
  174. Dallas -  May 11, 2011 - 3:42 pm

    Z would be nice to know about

    Reply
  175. 3lf -  May 11, 2011 - 3:41 pm

    I agree with FrenchLady13. Or “S” plz, for my beloved SUJU!!!!

    Reply
  176. Jackson -  May 11, 2011 - 3:39 pm

    Awesome post, you guys should go into the history of Q and/or X. Neither of them seem necessary in modern English to me, since they combine consonant sounds but don’t really have those sounds today.

    For Q to make a /kw/ a U seems necessary every time, which makes it seem redundant. X is apparently meant to make a /ks/ but seems to sound like a /z/ sometimes, as in xenophobia, and xylophone, and a /gz/ sometimes in words like exhausting, and exact. It’s even unnecessary as a letter because words in like excellent, KS would require the same number of letters.

    Reply
  177. RenataParkes -  May 11, 2011 - 3:23 pm

    The letter “k” as the Italians do not have such. Also, cut out the PC stuff-don’t we all get tired of that? It’s BC – before Christ.

    Reply
  178. boo -  May 11, 2011 - 3:20 pm

    s or g

    Reply
  179. jessica -  May 11, 2011 - 3:08 pm

    how you all doin

    Reply
  180. Ea -  May 11, 2011 - 2:59 pm

    @Paul The word alphabet comes from the first two greek letters, alpha and beta.

    Reply
  181. priya -  May 11, 2011 - 2:44 pm

    the Letter “P” is so intriguing. Could you explain more about it?

    Reply
  182. Nitya -  May 11, 2011 - 2:38 pm

    I would like more info on the letter s, and particularly its origins from that weird f lookalike character. Hope it wasn’t done before I happened across this wonderful site.

    Reply
  183. Sarah -  May 11, 2011 - 2:24 pm

    idk y im commenting on this but it makes me happy

    Reply
  184. Jake Sylvestre -  May 11, 2011 - 2:09 pm

    This is a very interesting topic. I always look forward to read this section because it astounds me with its interesting pieces of research as it divulges the history of the different fields of the English Language. I am curious as to how the letter “L” came into the English alphabet. I would also like to know the etymological background of the word “alphabet”.

    @ paul
    alphabet

    alpha is the first letter of the greek alphabet and Beta is the last letter

    Reply
    • Samuel Davis -  November 10, 2014 - 12:17 pm

      Omega is the last letter in the Greek alphabet! Ω!

      Reply
  185. the epicness that is me -  May 11, 2011 - 1:57 pm

    Who else votes that we should get rid of the letter c? its so useless, k and s make the same sounds

    Reply
  186. Daphne -  May 11, 2011 - 1:46 pm

    oy oy! so many interesting letters!!!

    I like
    L
    X
    R
    Q

    sounds like elixir….. queen.

    HA i have made a word of my letter choices so mow you must investigate these letters.

    Reply
  187. troy mitchell -  May 11, 2011 - 1:08 pm

    i just looked at the list…. thanks french lady….i’m with you…

    Reply
  188. troy mitchell -  May 11, 2011 - 1:06 pm

    The letter L is of particular interest to me, i doubt it is the most popular, maybe some people can help me out and ask for L……

    Love….

    Reply
  189. Doaa -  May 11, 2011 - 12:21 pm

    Aleph (أ); is also the sound of the first letter of the Arabic Alphabet; so doesn’t that just prove that we all nothing at the end but ONE?

    Reply
  190. Lucia D'Angelo -  May 11, 2011 - 11:52 am

    Let’s go straight to X !, used so frequently in the Basque language, a olanguage unrelated to any other in the world, yet similar in sound to X used in Chinese, right? I like learning the origin and derivation of letters and words, since our modern English is such a relatively new language in the world, formed only 400 years ago (or so) in part by Shakespeare and the King James Bible.

    Reply
  191. blubba -  May 11, 2011 - 11:51 am

    ssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss

    Reply
  192. blubba -  May 11, 2011 - 11:50 am

    s

    Reply
  193. Meep -  May 11, 2011 - 11:39 am

    The letter “4″ please

    Reply
  194. christensen -  May 11, 2011 - 11:22 am

    One for vote for the letter /c/. Interested in it’s such common usage despite its redundancies (/k/ and /s/ make the same sounds).

    Reply
  195. R. Winston -  May 11, 2011 - 11:15 am

    Was Robert Graves correct in The White Goddess when he claimed the N and the F traded places in the alphabet after the Battle of the Trees?

    Reply
  196. Sydney -  May 11, 2011 - 11:13 am

    I really liked Bull’s question on why the letter “W” is not referred to as “double v.” Please research “W” next! I would love to hear what you have to say about this letter!

    Reply
  197. Brittany -  May 11, 2011 - 11:00 am

    very interested in learning the history behind X!

    Reply
  198. Priscilla -  May 11, 2011 - 10:38 am

    d and b since the look similar in lower case.

    Reply
  199. Bekah -  May 11, 2011 - 10:11 am

    Investigate the letter Q. I wanna know what the point in it is, besides just making words look fancy.

    Reply
  200. French Lady -  May 11, 2011 - 10:07 am

    I’d like to learn the letter “L” for… lion, love, likable, luscious, leo, let’s, live, lick, lasting, Lord, lucky, laughter, lust, lips, lap, limbo, like-minded, lifeguard, lessons, leisurely, leader, ladylove, lady-in-waiting, Lancelot, lake, landmark, landscape, lenitive, legalize, legend, limelight, linkages, linguist, linkup, lionhearted, linger, lyrical, lurid, lubricate, lucid, lovelorn, longing, longstanding, longevity, loose ends, lottery, Lord’s Prayer, lost longtime, light hearted, lifesaver, looking glass, lovable, literature, literacy, lock, loanword, leading question, lessee, legmen, listen, lockout, lookout, lodging, lotion, lorn, lubricate, lure, lover, luxury,…LIST

    Reply
  201. Bull -  May 11, 2011 - 10:03 am

    Why is “W” not called Double Vee???

    Reply
  202. Chloe -  May 11, 2011 - 9:51 am

    Can you explain the letter ‘C’ and the letter ‘P’ sometime? I’d love to know!!

    Reply
  203. Nina -  May 11, 2011 - 9:19 am

    X, V, or W. X is interesting in its own right, and why is it used to denote ‘j’ sounds when transcribing foreign words (e.g. Xian)? V and W are interesting, because W often has a V sound in germanic languages.

    Reply
  204. #1 Skillet Fan -  May 11, 2011 - 9:08 am

    I’d Like M :)

    Reply
  205. name -  May 11, 2011 - 9:05 am

    do C. I wonder why we use it when we could/kould use k or s

    Reply
  206. Vegtam -  May 11, 2011 - 9:04 am

    Interesting! The first letter of the Futhark and other runic alphabets is Fehu, which means Cattle, and it actually looks like an F, very similar to the description made here for the Aleph. Moreover, together with a giant, a cow was the first being to appear in the universe according to norse mythologies.

    Reply
  207. Stacy -  May 11, 2011 - 8:46 am

    How about P

    Reply
  208. A -  May 11, 2011 - 8:36 am

    @Paul, I don’t know for sure, but “Alphabet” just sounds like it combines “alpha” and “beta”, the first two letters of the Greek alphabet. There’s probably more to it, but it doesn’t sound like it’s that complicated a history.

    Reply
  209. Andrew -  May 11, 2011 - 8:34 am

    Z
    Z
    Z
    Z
    Z
    Z
    Z
    Z
    Z
    Z
    Z
    Z

    Reply
  210. alesha bivens -  May 11, 2011 - 8:00 am

    Wow that amazing forreal what about the letter t??

    Reply
  211. Ryan Mode -  May 11, 2011 - 7:55 am

    This was a very interesting and informative article. Please can you investigate the letter ‘Q’. Even though it is one of the least used letters in the English language, I would really like to find out where it came from and why there are no words, in the English language, beginning with ‘Q’ without the letter ‘u’ immediately following after. The only word I can think of beginning with ‘Q’ without the letter ‘u’ is ‘Qatar’ and that is a proper noun. Thank You

    Reply
  212. aprichita upadhyaya -  May 11, 2011 - 7:32 am

    i would like to know about theletter T

    Reply
  213. aprichita upadhyaya -  May 11, 2011 - 7:31 am

    it is amazing to go through the site. i hope it will improve my knowledge a lot. i will request my friends to see this.

    Reply
  214. Rachelle -  May 11, 2011 - 7:21 am

    What about the letter R?

    Reply
  215. Sebastian -  May 11, 2011 - 7:19 am

    Thank you for a very interesting article. I was wondering if you could list some of the sources for your research on these origins for this and whatever the next letter is. I’ve always wondered how these things are researched.

    Reply
  216. Valérie -  May 11, 2011 - 7:01 am

    I would like to know why

    “W” is called “double-’U'” in English and “double-’V'” in French.
    Can’t we all see it is a “double-’V'”?

    Valérie

    Reply
  217. ??? -  May 11, 2011 - 6:50 am

    z

    Reply
  218. Mommy of MMM -  May 11, 2011 - 6:38 am

    J please!

    Reply
  219. Jungle -  May 11, 2011 - 6:34 am

    “R” please!!

    Reply
  220. Jen -  May 11, 2011 - 6:22 am

    J

    Reply
  221. Meg -  May 11, 2011 - 6:16 am

    Hm…how about “M?” :)

    Reply
  222. Mark -  May 11, 2011 - 5:21 am

    I agree with Rebecca, the letter “C”

    “I would say “c”. I’ve always thought it was kind of unnecessary because it makes a “k” and an “s” sound, and we already have those letters!”

    Reply
  223. CybrSage -  May 11, 2011 - 4:49 am

    Interestingly enough, the first written alphabetic writing found to date was located in Egypt, where it is believed that the Hebrew slaves who routinely carved out the hyroglyphs altered them and formed a sound based alphabet – or more precisely a sound based aleph beit. This same writing was found in the turquoise mines, where Hewbrew slaves toiled. A prayer to God begging for deliverance was found etched into the wall. All the semetic peoples used derivations of the same language, so it is no surprise the Phonecians also formed a version of the letter Aleph.

    Reply
  224. Incognita -  May 11, 2011 - 4:45 am

    I vote for the letter W. What’s up with the weird, two-part name?

    Reply
  225. Peter O'Connor -  May 11, 2011 - 4:32 am

    Aleph – isn’t a million miles from eire (Gaelic = burden).
    Not to be confused with Éire – the correct name in Irish for the island of Ireland and the state.

    Reply
  226. Ligia -  May 11, 2011 - 4:29 am

    Well, my name,obviously, starts with ‘L’, so I would like to know more about this letter, but ‘Q’ sounds more appealing as I am very curious to know its origin and how it came into use, as in my language, we do not have words which start with it.

    Reply
  227. elow -  May 11, 2011 - 4:07 am

    the letter is simply beautiful

    Reply
  228. Harry -  May 11, 2011 - 3:38 am

    To Camsy:

    Don’t look for these “scholars” to give you a legitimate answer for “X”. The letter identified as X in English or Latin comes from the ancient Greek letter “xi” (pronounced roughly as “hee”). It is the first letter in the name Christ. I say this because of their use of the neo-secular acronym “BCE” (before common era) instead of the term that has been used for centuries BC (before Christ) that people of all faiths, or of none have recognized and used. These days there are many “erudite” individuals that deny that Christ even truly existed. Makes me wonder what they are afraid of….

    Reply
    • wejiharfuisnd -  November 6, 2014 - 7:49 pm

      There is no proof.

      Reply
  229. hello! -  May 11, 2011 - 3:24 am

    Yey Lebanon!!!!!

    Reply
  230. Marzena from Poland -  May 11, 2011 - 3:23 am

    I’m selfish: please write about letter “M” :)

    Reply
  231. HAZIMAH -  May 11, 2011 - 3:06 am

    Research on H please! and W (double ‘U’). Why double ‘U’ and not double ‘v’?

    Reply
  232. beautifulPHILIPPINES -  May 11, 2011 - 2:41 am

    like ALEPHant :P

    Reply
  233. Cate -  May 11, 2011 - 2:28 am

    C or Q please – either would be interesting. Both seem a bit redundant in that their sounds could be replaced by other letters. And Q can rarely even be used on it’s own – what’s the point in a letter that has to be followed by a U all the time?? How did that happen? Another really interesting piece from the hot word team, reading these livens up my morning :)

    Reply
  234. Andrew -  May 11, 2011 - 12:28 am

    the whole thing with Vs Ws and Us (called “double u” but looks like two Vs)

    but I’m actually more interested in X please …

    Reply
  235. Ricky -  May 10, 2011 - 10:32 pm

    My favorite letter X!!!

    Reply
  236. Hussain -  May 10, 2011 - 10:04 pm

    H

    Reply
  237. Molly -  May 10, 2011 - 9:51 pm

    The letter “W”, because it was not part of the original Roman alphabet that we use.

    Reply
  238. Nadia -  May 10, 2011 - 9:35 pm

    This is very interesting! Could we have an article about the order of the alphabet? That seems like a big topic, but it would be really interesting. Also, maybe one about th, ch, and sh, and why so few languages have the th sound (if we don’t have one already)? Thank you!

    Reply
  239. Abbs -  May 10, 2011 - 9:27 pm

    This article was very interesting… I wonder where they get all of there information and if it is all nonfiction…

    I would love to learn more about the letter C. As some of the people above said, it makes the same sounds as the letters ‘s’ and ‘k’, but why would we need duplicates?

    Also, I’ve been wondering if the alphabet made in order like A being made first and Z being made last. If so then why were K and S created?

    So, I would love to learn more about the letter C, please.

    Reply
  240. anonymous -  May 10, 2011 - 9:25 pm

    plz plz the letter D!

    Reply
  241. anonymous -  May 10, 2011 - 9:25 pm

    i would l♥v to hear about the letter D!

    Reply
  242. Nonie -  May 10, 2011 - 8:49 pm

    Tell us about the letters S, L, D & R. Love your article. Thanks!

    Reply
  243. jame -  May 10, 2011 - 8:44 pm

    Letter J please… ???

    Reply
  244. TYPER16 -  May 10, 2011 - 8:43 pm

    @French Lady 13: You probably know this but the French W translates directly to “double v” in English. COULD YOU GUYS DO Q OR SOME USELESS LETTER LIKE THAT?!

    Reply
  245. jame -  May 10, 2011 - 8:43 pm

    I would like to know where’s the letter “J” derived from… “in the very near future” ??? I wonder when is that… hmmm.. i hope it won’t take long.. i’m so eager to know where letter “J” derived from.. =)

    Reply
  246. lyn -  May 10, 2011 - 8:29 pm

    thank you for the information. but how about the history of letter M?

    Reply
  247. CAM -  May 10, 2011 - 2:49 pm

    Today’s article was brought to you by the letter “A”

    Reply
  248. Christine -  May 10, 2011 - 2:48 pm

    Since the letter ‘p’ is not found in Arabic, I’m interested to know more about it.
    Thanks.

    Reply
  249. Rebecca -  May 10, 2011 - 2:44 pm

    I would say “c”. I’ve always thought it was kind of unnecessary because it makes a “k” and an “s” sound, and we already have those letters! Or the letter “z”.

    Reply
  250. Blaine -  May 10, 2011 - 2:43 pm

    I would love to learn about the letter L

    Reply
  251. French Lady 13 -  May 10, 2011 - 2:39 pm

    What about the letter “V” I have always wondered what language the English Alphabet took the astonishing letter. And if there is a “V” then why have a “W” And why call it a “W” when it obviously is a double “V”! :)

    Reply
  252. DMZ -  May 10, 2011 - 2:38 pm

    i say yes, tell us about that useless letter called “C”!

    Reply
  253. Chelsea-Brooke -  May 10, 2011 - 2:27 pm

    Or even “Z”

    Reply
  254. Kashxo -  May 10, 2011 - 2:25 pm

    oooooh, that is soooo cool!! Can we learn about the letter C next, please??

    Reply
  255. me -  May 10, 2011 - 2:14 pm

    n

    Reply
  256. kshdj -  May 10, 2011 - 2:07 pm

    ;)

    Reply
  257. Science4God -  May 10, 2011 - 1:23 pm

    How about letter “M”… :)

    Reply
  258. louis paiz -  May 10, 2011 - 12:55 pm

    if you could please i would like to know more about the alphabet that i found in an old dictionary where it shows the way of communication with thorns or rose buds with its steam on some 2 horisontal for a, 2 reects for b, perpendicular ford c, and so on. for me it was a great discovery i like to hear from the dictionary intelectuals about it . thank you very much for your attention.

    Reply
  259. Cheralyn -  May 10, 2011 - 12:41 pm

    C or M :)

    Reply
  260. Jonathan -  May 10, 2011 - 9:59 am

    J please!

    Reply
  261. JJ Rousseau -  May 10, 2011 - 9:11 am

    Emoticons, twitter, texting and so on in the future we will be no longer here to hear. Ay? What was the question, Oui?

    Reply
  262. Darcy Bittencourt -  May 10, 2011 - 9:06 am

    Very very interesting.
    I would like to know more about all letters to tell the truth. But If I had to choose only one it would be the letter D (from my first name of course).

    Reply
  263. SesameStreet -  May 10, 2011 - 7:58 am

    @eyesflux C is for cookie, that’s good enough for me. Speaking of which, I’m off to make some cookies.

    Reply
  264. camsy -  May 10, 2011 - 7:56 am

    I would love to hear about the letter X!

    Reply
  265. Carlitos -  May 10, 2011 - 6:37 am

    I wonder if it would ever be appropriate, in a future era, to devise a new alphabet and a new language based on knowledge and science and all the accumulated experience and intellect of humanity up to that point. A common language for a common people, united in their efforts to better their humanity, their world, and themselves. This assumes, boldly, that we’re all capable of continuing our own evolution.

    Reply
  266. A-more | BLOGCHI@mayopia.com -  May 10, 2011 - 6:21 am

    [...] Amore! When the Moon hits your eyes like a Biga Pizza Pie — What else is there to say — about the letter A — The Alpha and Omega or the Yin and Yang do pray. — Our language limitation — is confusing so they say — thanks for the information — beginning with the letter A. –>>L.T.Rhyme — Thirsty? Au, oui? — J.J.Rousseau [...]

    Reply
  267. Paul -  May 10, 2011 - 6:10 am

    This is a very interesting topic. I always look forward to read this section because it astounds me with its interesting pieces of research as it divulges the history of the different fields of the English Language. I am curious as to how the letter “L” came into the English alphabet. I would also like to know the etymological background of the word “alphabet”.

    Reply
  268. eyesflux -  May 10, 2011 - 4:37 am

    Would love to know abt the letter “C”

    Reply
  269. bob -  November 11, 2014 - 2:14 am

    19 or 21

    Reply
  270. R0s!£ -  November 11, 2014 - 10:50 am

    = 19

    Reply
  271. her -  November 11, 2014 - 2:56 pm

    21

    Reply
  272. mexican chode -  November 11, 2014 - 7:01 pm

    21

    Reply
  273. Always Assume -  November 12, 2014 - 1:53 pm

    90 :3 ): yuck

    Reply
  274. Sam -  November 12, 2014 - 6:04 pm

    21

    Reply

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